Sociology (SOC)

SOC N001 Non-Credit Adv Top Forensic Sc (1 credit)

SOC N002 Non-Credit Conflict Resolution (1 credit)

SOC N003 Non-Credit Bldg Trad Labor Law (1 credit)

SOC N004 Non-Credit Grievance&Arbitrati (1 credit)

SOC N005 Non-Credit - Public Relations (1 credit)

SOC N006 Non-Credit - Occupat Hlth & Sa (1 credit)

SOC N007 Non-Credit - Pub Sec Labor Law (1 credit)

SOC N008 Non-Credit Survey Labor Law (1 credit)

SOC N009 Non-Credit - Negotiations (1 credit)

SOC N010 Non-Credit Art&Skill Labr Lead (1 credit)

SOC N011 Non-Credit - Labor History (1 credit)

SOC N012 Non-Credit - Health & Safety (1 credit)

SOC N013 Non-Credit-Build Union Saf Com (1 credit)

SOC N014 Non-Credit - Workers Comp (1 credit)

SOC N015 Non-Credit-Art & Sci Cont Camp (1 credit)

SOC N016 Non-Credit-Global Labor Trends (1 credit)

SOC N017 Non-Credit - Adv Labor History (1 credit)

SOC N018 Non-Credit:Labor's Lessons (1 credit)

SOC N019 Non-Credit Legends of Labor (1 credit)

SOC 10SA SA Topic:Study Abroad (3-4 credits)

SOC 20SA SA Topic:Study Abroad (3-4 credits)

SOC 101 Intro to Sociology (3 credits)

Introduction to the scientific approach to the study of society, including the study of social structures; studies such topics as how we acquire self-identity, gender, our behavior in groups, bureaucracies, stereotyping, the role of the state, survey research, culture, and collective behavior. Satisfies Social Science GER. Satisfies Diversity GEP. Satisfies Globalization GEP.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 102 Social Problems (3 credits)

A sociological analysis of contemporary social issues including economic crises, concentration of wealth, poverty, crime, sexism, race and ethnic relations, mental illness, population growth, war and peace, and relations with other countries. Satisfies Social Science GER. Satisfies Diversity GEP. Satisfies Gender Studies minor.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 140 Wage Gap Seminar-Gender Series (3 credits)

This course focuses on evaluating and discussing quantitative and qualitative literature to understand issues surrounding gender based wage disparities and its impact upon women in the labor market. Students will not only focus on examining long-term trends in the gender pay gap but also focus on the impact of the education, employment policies, state and federal laws/regulations in ensuring economic wellbeing. This seminar is ideal opportunity for anyone interested in researching and reporting on gender based equality issues.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Adult Learning Seminar, Undergraduate

SOC 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

This freshman seminar course examines the most significant contemporary social problems in our culture. Issues are examined from a sociological perspective that is enhanced by students’ work at service sites. This is the second part of a 2 semester course sequence for first year students. Pre-requisite is SOC 102 Service Learning/Freshman Seminar.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

SOC 170 Special Topics in Sociology (3 credits)

SOC 201 Schools in Society (3 credits)

SOC 202 Adv Stud of Soc Prob FS & SL (3 credits)

SOC 204 Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)

SOC 205 Ethnic & Minority Relations (3 credits)

This course provides an analysis of relationships between dominant and minority groups, with a particular focus on ethnic and racial stratification in the U.S. As part of this discussion, we focus on intersecting statuses that shape the outcomes of individuals and groups experiences, including their interactions with each other and social institutions. While the course largely focuses on issues of race/ethnicity, we will also address other forms of minority-dominant group relations, such as sexual orientation, social class, and gender, as the intersectionality of statuses is important in any attempt to gain a better understanding of all these types of relationships. We begin the course by addressing the issue of race as a social construct rather than a biological fact, but a construction that carries very real consequences. We then shift to a focus on prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination, with particular attention on how they serve to create, sustain, and reproduce oppression and inequalities. We then examine how privileged statuses, particularly white privilege serve to marginalize nonwhites and the damaging paradox of this privilege for economically disenfranchised whites. We conclude the course by addressing the future of face and racism in the 21st century, such as colorblind racism, and the implications for coalition building across racial/ethnic lines. Satisfies Diversity GEP and Criminal Justice requirement.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 206 Theories of Crime (3 credits)

The goal of this course is to examine the current state of criminological theory. It examines the efforts of criminologists in various academic disciplines to explain the cause of crime. Traditional theories will also be discussed. Criminal Justice elective.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 207 Juvenile Justice (3 credits)

A study of delinquency and its causes, with attention to both social-psychological and structural-theoretical frameworks. Criminal Justice elective. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or SOC 102

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 208 Sociology of Gender (3 credits)

The study of the learned patterns of behavior of males and females in the United States and cross-culturally; topics include hormonal and sex differences, gender socialization, the contemporary women’s movement; special emphasis is placed upon the connection of sexism, racism, and class inequality. Satisfies Diversity GEP. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirements. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or SOC 102

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 209 Sociology of IntimateRelations (3 credits)

Examines family life in the United States, its cross-cultural and historical antecedents; current changes and family process, including courtship and marriage in contemporary society. Satisfied Gender Studies minor, GEP Social Science, Sociology (not CJ) elective.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 210 African-American Catholicism (3 credits)

A sociological analysis of religion is as old as sociology itself, and race is one of the key themes in sociology. This course will combine the two themes by using a sociological lens to study African-American Catholicism. We will begin by examining theoretical perspectives that can then be used to study Black American Catholicism. We will use these theoretical perspectives to examine several key works by historians, theologians, and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops that tell the story of African-American Catholics in the United States. Satisfies Africana Studies requirement, GEP SS.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science

SOC 211 Classical Sociological Theory (3 credits)

SOC 214 Sociology of Youth (3 credits)

SOC 216 Alcohol, Drugs & Society (3 credits)

This course explores a sociological approach to substance use and its impact on contemporary American society. What social factors such as gender, race, and class shape substance use? How do major social institutions such as criminal justice, education, and health care deal with substance use? What public policies and programs exist to regulate substance use, and how well do they work? Examples of topics discussed include women and substance use, college student binge drinking, substance use on the national agenda, and the community impact of crack cocaine. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 217 Mental Health & Society (3 credits)

This course examines the connections between mental health and society. What are the major forms of mental and behavioral health and illness? How widespread are mental disorders and what predicts their occurrence? What impact do they have on society and institutions such as health care and criminal justice? What professions and organizations treat mental disorders? Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 218 Social Gerontology (3 credits)

SOC 219 Social Deviance (3 credits)

This course examines examples of deviance, e.g., the Holocaust, state terror and torture, and mental illness. It explores how laypersons and experts conceptualize deviance, how definitions of deviance change, who labels behavior deviant, and the consequences for those labeled deviant. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or 102.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 225 Intro to American CJ (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the criminal justice system in the U.S. The primary goal of this course is to foster a general understanding of the functions and impact of the 3 components of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. In addressing these components, we will examine each component from the due process and crime control perspectives of criminal justice. Due process stresses individual rights while crime control stresses the protection of the society at large Some of the topics that we will cover include policing, the courts, incarceration and alternative sanctions, the War on Drugs, and the War on Terrorism. The course will conclude with a discussion of the future of criminal justice.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 231 Probation and Parole (3 credits)

SOC 232 Sociology of Human Sexuality (3 credits)

This course examines anthropological and sociological perspectives on human sexuality. Among the topics to be covered: reproductive ritual; deviant patterns of sexual behavior; ideologies of sexuality; legal shaping of sexual behavior; and the methods by which we obtain good information on sexual behavior. Satisfies Gender Studies minor, Diversity GEP, Social Science, Sociology (not CJ) elective.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 234 Federal Crim Law & Prosecution (3 credits)

SOC 235 Federal Search & Seizure (3 credits)

SOC 237 Human Origns & Prehist of Cult (3 credits)

SOC 238 Violence & Society (3 credits)

SOC 241 American Labor Movement (3 credits)

SOC 243 Sexuality & Relationships (3 credits)

SOC 245 Law and Social Policy (3 credits)

SOC 246 CJ Ethics & Legal Responsblty (3 credits)

SOC 247 Organized Crime (3 credits)

This course provides an historical foundation and comprehensive examination of organized crime that will guide the student through the various developments of this criminal activity. Besides the stereotypical organized crime viewpoints, which are often portrayed on television and in movie theatres, this course will also explore other unusual and less known perspectives of modern day organized crime. Students will utilize critical thinking exercises and ethical perspectives while developing a keen understanding of how organized crime is associated with such activities as human trafficking, computer and Internet crime, vehicle smuggling, and terrorism. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 249 Federal CJ (3 credits)

This course will examine the criminal justice at the federal level. The main areas are the role of each branch of government; how agencies are funded; the major investigation, prosecution, probation, and correction elements; and individual investigative agencies including Inspector General. The course will cover the mission of and interrelationships among individual agencies. Criminal Justice elective. Pre-requisite SOC 225

Prerequisites: SOC 225

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 250 Found of Adds for CJ Professnl (3 credits)

SOC 251 Gender and the Law (3 credits)

SOC 252 Media & Popular Culture (3 credits)

This course will examine the organization of contemporary media and popular culture from a variety of sociological perspectives. Particular attention will be paid to the production and consumption of popular music, talk shows, and sporting events. There will be discussion on how fads spread through society, how our identities are shaped by and mediated through popular culture, and why the media focuses so much attention on seemingly mundane events. This class will examine how recent technological changes influence how we consume popular culture. We will utilize discussions of Nike, Netflix, Starbucks, videogames, nightlife in Philadelphia, Shakespeare, and digital gambling to understand how popular culture is organized.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 253 Race and Social Justice (3 credits)

In this course we will examine the issue of social justice as it pertains to race and ethnicity. The course will address the social and cultural constructions of race and ethnicity and their effects on social institutions, interpersonal relationships, and quality of life primarily in the U.S., but also abroad. Specifically, we will focus on how advantages and disadvantages are distributed among individuals and societies, why this process occurs, and how we can work to achieve balance and equality. As part of our discussions, we will focus on the contributions of racial and ethnic minorities in our changing social, economic, political, and legal institutions by examining controversial topics central to debates on racial justice and policy. Criminal Justice elective, satisfies Diversity GEP course

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 254 Violence and Victims (3 credits)

This course is designed to explore the serious problem of violence in our society from a sociological perspective. We will address a variety of types of violence, its causes, consequences, and theories for prevention. Topics which will be discussed include wife abuse, rape, child abuse, gang warfare, and street violence. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the structural causes of violence such as gender, race, and social class inequality as well as the effect of pornography, the media, and drugs/alcohol on violence. Particular attention will be given to the consequences of violence for both individual victims and society as a whole. We will also focus on the practical reality of violence in this society by speaking with several practitioners and touring a local domestic violence shelter. Criminal Justice elective. Satisfies Gender Studies minor requirement.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 259 Youth, Culture & Deviance (3 credits)

This course offers economic, cultural, political and social perspectives on American youth based on sociological theory. Special attention will be paid to youth popular cultures and the unique social problems facing young adults (e.g., gangs, drugs, suicide and teen pregnancy). Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 260 Language and the Law (3 credits)

(See LIN 260. Satisfies GEP Ethics-Intensive overlay).

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 261 Intro to Crim Investigation (3 credits)

Teaches students how to gather the maximum amount of information necessary to solve a crime efficiently, e.g., from witnesses, suspects, informants, surveillants, as well as from the physical evidence at the crime scene. Suggested also for prelaw students. Criminal Justice elective.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 262 White Collar Crime (3 credits)

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the meaning of white collar crime and the types of activities in which white collar criminals engage. Initially, the lectures focus on the development of a comprehensive definition of white collar crime and then, having established this foundation, turn to the variety of white collar crimes in the U.S. today. Criminal Justice elective.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 263 Criminology (3 credits)

SOC 264 Crim Courts & Crim Procedures (3 credits)

An analysis of the legal and practice problems presented in the administration of criminal justice from investigation to post-conviction review. Subjects include right to counsel, law of arrest, search and seizure, police interrogation and confessions, prosecutorial discretion, plea bargaining, bail, and juries. Case method used. Suggested for pre-law students. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 267 Introduction to Corrections (3 credits)

An analysis of the history and development of modern correctional systems. The focus will be on the corrections process as experienced by both offender and official. Special topics will include prisoner rights, litigation, women and corrections, and juveniles and the correctional process. Cross-cultural perspectives and recent correctional innovations will also be examined in order to give the student a comprehensive view. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 269 Introd to Law Enforcement (3 credits)

Principles of maintaining the legal system with reference to its community of responsibility; individual and interacting procedures of the various agencies through which persons involved are processed; structures and interrelationships of the federal, state, and local jurisdictions.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 270 Special Topics (3 credits)

Course content determined by instructor. This course number/title will be given to new courses being offered within the academic year that are not listed in the catalog. The course will explore some topic related to sociology or criminal justice, focusing on the role of institutions in explaining human behavior.

Attributes: American Studies Course

SOC 271 Sociology of Migration (3 credits)

This course will take a global view of immigration by examining flows across the world and within the United States in particular. While globalization on one level has existed for thousands of years, we are currently in a phase where people, goods, and cultures are exchanged internationally in a quicker and more intensive way than ever before. These flows are shaped by international agreements such as the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and by national immigration laws. Though our focus will be on the United States, we will compare current immigration patterns and experiences in other nations as well. Satisfies Globalization. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 273 Collective Bargaining (3 credits)

SOC 274 Sports in Society (3 credits)

This course focuses on sports as social and cultural phenomena. It is designed to highlight the elements of sports, its participants, its values, and its relationship to American society.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 275 Law of Industrial Relations (3 credits)

SOC 276 Terrorism,Intelligence&Enforce (3 credits)

The focus of this course is directed toward law enforcement and intelligence issues that are employed to defeat, deny, disrupt terrorism, diminish the threat of, and defend against terrorism. This course introduces the student to various contemporary terrorist groups, current events, investigative and operational methodologies employed by the law enforcement and intelligence communities, and to weapons of mass destruction. This course is interactive through the use of exercises that allow students to experience how law enforcement and intelligence responds to the threat of terrorism.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science

SOC 281 Benefits & Compensation (3 credits)

SOC 286 Vio in Intimate Relationships (3 credits)

SOC 287 Sex, Gender & Family in Cults (3 credits)

This course will look at cults/new religious movements in relation to the larger culture; looking at the most recent wave of cults/movements in our history, dating back to the early 1960’s and continuing to the present. We will start by looking at the historical and social background of the most recent cults, then move on to discussion of the various terms, and the perspectives behind terms, that are used to describe these groups. We will use social psychology, more specifically, the social influence perspective, to explain why people join, stay in, and leave cults and will focus on sex, gender, and family patterns in cults/new religious movements.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 300 CommEngSch:BldgPart thru Rsrch (3 credits)

Engaged scholarship can take several forms. Broadly defined, it “means connecting the rich resources of the university to our most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems” (Boyer, 1996, p. 19). One key way of sharing these resources is through research – not “on” the community, but “with” the community. This type of research model is one in which the research projects are developed with community organization staff, faculty, and students together, building on the unique strengths of those involved. In this course, students will work with a community-based organization to design and conduct research on an issue related to homelessness or affordable housing. Throughout the semester, students will learn about research methods, research ethics, and the particular urban context within which they will be working. More importantly, students will gain experience working alongside staff of a community-based organization to solve problems or assess needs and strengths. GEP SS. Honors.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Honors Course, Undergraduate

SOC 310 Policing in Black and Blue (3 credits)

This course will review the sociological and policy concerns that have contributed to the racial tensions between police and communities of color. The course will examine the sociological roots of the urban ghetto, consider the role of mass incarceration and the rise of the surveillance state with the war on drugs. We will review stop and frisk, community policing, focused deterrence, stop snitching, and DOJ reports on Philadelphia/Ferguson and police-involved shootings. It will also include some of the European studies of policing immigrant communities in the face of terrorist threats.

Prerequisites: (SOC 1015 or SOC 1011 or SOC 1025 or SOC 1021) or SOC 101 or SOC 102

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 311 Research Methods II (3 credits)

SOC 312 Social Research Methods I (3 credits)

Presents the main ways of gathering social scientific information, e.g., questionnaires, interviews, observation, experiments, content analysis, etc.; Specific emphasis placed on the ethical considerations when conducting social science research. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or SOC 102

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate Day Division level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 313 Data Analysis (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for conducting quantitative data analysis. Using the General Social Survey and other publicly available data sets, we will learn about transforming variables, conducting univariate and bivariate analysis, requesting descriptive and inferential statistics, and learning how to interpret these statistics. Emphasis is on doing the analysis and presenting the analysis for research projects. This course is a prerequisite for Seminar, SOC 495.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 314 The Criminal Offender (3 credits)

The Criminal Offender is an interface between the law and mental health. This course examines the components of human behavior that bring people into a judicial setting. Content will cover criminal personalities, forensic interview, and the role of forensic psychology and psychiatry. Domestic violence offenders, sex offenders, stalkers, gang members, and offenders who commit hate crimes and homicide will be discussed. Definitions and dynamics of criminal motherhood and the psychodynamics of violent juvenile offenders will be presented. Use of the internet and various forms of social media by offenders will also be discussed.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 315 Cult of Addictn: ST Amsterdam (3 credits)

SOC 316 Fair Trade:Coffee-Co-Op to Cup (3 credits)

This course is designed to trace the path of fair trade coffee beans as they are grown in a cooperative in Nicaragua until they reach a consumers’ cup in the United States. In this class, we will examine the labor- intensive activities that go into producing a cup of coffee, the environmental impacts of producing shade grown and organic coffees, and the economic benefits that farmers receive for growing coffee in Central America. We will travel to Nicaragua and live alongside coffee farmers who are growing fair trade coffee. We will learn about the “Coffee Crisis” that greatly affected Central American farmers in the early 2000s, and we will look at the limits and possibilities of producing coffee in a cooperative. Prior to attending the trip we will read about the political and economic dynamics of Central America, the history of coffee and the fair trade movement, and what fair trade means in the minds of ethical consumers. In thinking about the stories behind their purchases, students will gain broader insight into the limits and possibilities of integrating their values into their everyday shopping patterns. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 317 Sociolinguistics (3 credits)

(Please see LIN 317 for description)

Attributes: Communication Studies ILC Crs, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 318 Social Just:Dominican Republic (3 credits)

SOC 320 Sociology of Work (3 credits)

SOC 322 Cult & Politics of Motherhood (3 credits)

The course considers motherhood as a political and cultural issue in society. Topics will include the social construction of public debates about teenage mothers, single mothers, welfare mothers, and abortion. We will also review the work of scholars who examine how social class and privilege construct our notions of "good" mothers and appropriate childrearing. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or SOC 102. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 323 Health and Society (3 credits)

An overview of health care in the United States with attention to its historical antecedents; definitions of illnesses; examines the effect of social factors on the occurrence of illness and its treatment; studies the organization of health facilities. GEP SS. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 325 Women and Health (3 credits)

This course will look at the health industry from a feminist perspective. We will examine the role of women in providing health care, gender differences in the care given to patients, and health care issues specific to women. The course will also consider race and class differences among women working in and served by the health care industry.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 326 Emerging Issues Adulthood (3 credits)

SOC 327 Sociology of Religion (3 credits)

Examines major sociological attempts to interpret the role of religious belief systems in modern industrial society and culture with emphasis on: a historical and structural analysis of religious belief systems and polities in the United States; the role of religion in community formation, national, and ethnic identity; and contemporary religious movements as attempts to channel or cope with forces of change.

Prerequisites: (SOC 1011 or SOC 1015) or (SOC 1021 or SOC 1025) or SOC 101 or SOC 102

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 328 The Wire (3 credits)

Although journalists and media critics around the world have heaped deserved acclaim on The Wire, many people do not recognize its contribution to social science. Students in this seminar will watch, critique, and discuss selected episodes of The Wire along with assigned readings on urban inequality, crime, and violence that relate to these episodes. The assigned readings will feature academic books and research articles that describe and analyze life and experiences in inner city neighborhoods, as well as the social, economic, political, and cultural factors that shape or influence these experiences. CJ elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science

SOC 330 Urban Sociology (3 credits)

What makes some neighborhoods in cities great places to live? Why do other neighborhoods struggle? In this course, we will learn how sociologists study cities, what social policies have affected cities, how inequalities along the lines of race/ethnicity and social class have shaped cities, how cities might fit into a sustainable vision for the future, and what we can learn from cities in other countries. By the end of the course, students will understand what can be done to improve the quality of life for families in urban neighborhoods. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or SOC 102

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 331 Urban Ethnography (3 credits)

Though it is certainly useful to analyze cities with numbers and statistical analyses, one can perhaps best capture life within cities through ethnography. Ethnography allows the researcher to dig deep and analyze any number of social settings. Ethnography encompasses several different methods, but in this course we will concentrate on observation and writing field notes. Both sociologists and anthropologists use these methods in their research. In this course, you will not only learn to practice ethnography, but you will also read and critique several urban ethnographies.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 334 African-American Experience (3 credits)

SOC 335 Classes and Power in US (3 credits)

Examines the social, economic, and political inequalities in the United States; analyzes causes of social stratification; studies social mobility and the existence of a power elite. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 336 Sociology of Appalachia (3 credits)

This course is a survey of the social and economic life of the Appalachian region from the colonial period of American history to the present. The course examines changing patterns of culture, land use, economy, politics, and social structure in the mountains in an effort to understand the contemporary social system in Appalachia. Special emphasis will be placed upon the interaction of mountain residents with the broader forces of social change at work in America: changing family structures, gender roles, economic systems, political cultures, material life, and value orientations. Stereotyped images of Appalachia as an isolated, atypical land, unconnected to the rest of the American experience will be contrasted with a view of Appalachian history as shaped and affected by the same forces of political concentration, capitalist transformation, mass society, and the bureaucratic state that have created modern America. Faith/Justice course.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 337 Forensic Financial Analysis (3 credits)

This course covers the detection of illegal financial transactions. Major topics include money laundering, fraud, embezzlement, and illicit accounting practices. Students will learn data gathering and analysis techniques for financial transactions, records, legitimate businesses, illegal organizations, and individuals. The course will include preparation for trial. Prerequisite: a basic course in accounting or permission of the instructor.

SOC 338 Police and the Community (3 credits)

This course will examine factors contributing to cooperation or friction between law enforcement personnel and the community. Emphasis will be placed on political, social and economic forces which influence this. Policies addressing this problem will be reviewed. Criminal Justice elective.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 340 The Ethical Consumer (3 credits)

The recent “ethical turn” in markets has led to a growing number of products that give proceeds to a charitable or altruistic cause. We see Pink Ribbons when we shop for a car, fair trade coffee at Wal-Mart, and product (RED) clothing at the GAP. Many of these products and brands are creating significant social change; others are “greenwashing” or “fairwashing” markets by making false promises. In this course we will read research from sociology, marketing, and psychology to understand the consumer behavior of individuals trying to change the world through shopping; we will examine the strengths and weaknesses of these “consumer-dependent” social movements; and we will examine the social forces that led “shopping for a cause” to become a modern means for creating social change. This course will conclude with an attempt to put our ideas into practice through group-projects designed to raise funds for local mission-driven businesses such as Cal’s Cupcakes, Alex’s Lemonade, or Fair Trade retailers. Pre-requisite: PHL 154. Satisfies Ethics Intensitve, American Studies.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: American Studies Course, Ethics Intensive (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 344 Populations (3 credits)

SOC 345 Law and Social Policy (3 credits)

An exploration of various dimensions of the relationship between law and social policy in contemporary U.S. society. In assessing how judicial opinions and legislative efforts affect social relations and institutional arrangements, inquiry is focused upon: (1) the ways in which social problems become defined as legal issues; (2) the forces which shape the initiation and ultimate formulation of legislative acts designed to affect public policy; (3) the role which cultural values and assumptions play in framing legal arguments and influencing judicial opinions and remedial programs; (4) the issue of compliance and the ways in which it is measured and enforced, and (5) the strengths and limitations of the law as a means of achieving specific social policy objectives. Criminal Justice elective. Faith/Justice course.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 346 CJ Ethics & Legal Responsblty (3 credits)

This course focuses on major ethical and legal responsibility issues in the legal professions including conflicts of interest, confidentiality, competence, counseling, economic pressures, advocacy tactics, and professionalism, as well as the standards and rules which govern the legal professions, The course will be especially helpful to students who plan to enter law school upon graduation. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 348 Consumer Culture in Global Per (3 credits)

SOC 349 Poverty, Ethics & Soc.Policy (3 credits)

This course offers an overview of poverty in the United States, explores the ethical principles surrounding poverty and our response to it, and examines social policies that seek to ameliorate poverty. Students will work on a semester-long academic assignment which will engage them in one aspect of poverty and social policy.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 351 Gender and the Law (3 credits)

Utilizing a case law approach, this course examines historical and contemporary judicial responses to gender inequality. Among the topics covered are: affirmative action, no-fault divorce, criminal sentencing disparities, and the intersection of sex, race, and social class inequalities in the law. Criminal Justice elective. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement. Pre-requisite SOC 101 or SOC 102

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 353 Restorative Justice Practice (3 credits)

This course places restorative justice theory into practice. Students will learn and become proficient in several restorative practices including peacemaking circles, sentencing circles, restorative conferencing, reparative boards, youth aid panels and victim offender mediation. As an experiential course, students will participate in all of the practices throughout the semester. Some of these practices are hundreds of years old. Many criminal justice agencies see potential widespread application. The skills taught in this course can be used in any situation involving conflict. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 355 Race, Crime & CJ (3 credits)

This course examines the topic of race and ethnicity in relation to crime and criminal justice processing. More specifically, we focus on several issues: 1) the role of privilege and marginalization in the context of race and ethnicity and the criminal justice system: 2) the impact of these factors on intergroup relationships generally and the responses of the criminal justice system to criminal behavior, victimization, and employment within the criminal justice field; 3) how the responses of the criminal justice system affect the lives of offenders, victims, and agents of the criminal justice system for various racial/ethnic groups; 4) the current patterns of crime and victimization in relation to race/ethnicity? In addressing these questions, it is important to note that this is an upper-level sociology/criminal justice course, so do not expect it to be lecture driven, although some lectures will be presented. Much of the course work will revolve around class discussions and written analysis of the readings. Criminal Justice elective, satisfied Diversity GEP.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 356 Gender, Crime & CJ (3 credits)

An examination of the gendered nature of criminal victimization, offending, and criminal justice processing from a feminist sociological perspective. Students will read and critically evaluate in a seminar format feminist criminologists’ analyses of topics such as fear of crime, gangs, prostitution, corporate violence against women, policing, and corrections. Special emphasis will be given to the intersections of gender, racial/ethnic and social class inequalities. Criminal Justice elective. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 357 Vio & Reconciliation in N Ire (3 credits)

SOC 358 Consumr Cult & Globl Perspctve (3 credits)

In recent years there have been dramatic changes in the ways we consume: chain stores are proliferating, products are increasingly being produced in developing countries, consumers are taking on record levels of debt, fashion and tastes are evolving at a faster rate than ever before, and advertising expenditures are at historic highs. All of these changes are associated with what we have come to know as globalization. This course will examine how advances in technology, communication, and transportation systems all impact our everyday lives as consumers. We will utilize contemporary sociological theories of globalization to examine these societal changes. The class will conclude with an in-depth analysis of ethical consumption. Although this course is primarily sociological in orientation, we will also examine how marketers psychologists, and social critics write about global consumer culture. Satisfies Globalization.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 360 Sociology of Law (3 credits)

An analysis of contemporary theories of law; examines the statements of the main exponents of the consensus, pluralist, elitist, and dialectical models of law creation; focus also on the tie between the models and the social context in which they emerged and developed. Criminal Justice elective. Faith/Justice course.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 363 Phila: In Black and White (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to explore the topic of race relations with reference to a case study of Philadelphia. It is a unique course insofar as. it directly addresses the issue of race in a multidisciplinary way, and it offers a unique opportunity to explore a topic and a city that are only dealt with indirectly in other courses. This course will explore the impact of race on social, economic, and political life in Philadelphia. Utilizing a socio-historical approach, it will focus on the work of W.E.B. DuBois and other social scientists who have documented the effects of race on Philadelphians in such diverse areas as housing, health care, employment, and family life. Satisfies Diversity GEP. Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 365 Crime & Urban Communities (3 credits)

From the beginning of the study of sociology in the United States, sociologists have studied life within a community context, documenting how space matters. The physical and social aspects of neighborhoods affect how likely crime is to occur in them and how residents can fight this crime. In addition to learning how space affects crime, we will learn key theories and concepts which sociologists use in studying urban crime, we will discuss current major issues in crime such as re-entry, and we will study crime-fighting strategies. Faith/Justice. Criminal Justice elective. Satisfies Africana Studies requirement.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 368 Cults as Social Movements (3 credits)

This course looks at the social psychology and the social movement aspect of selected cults. Questions that the course examines: What is a cult? Who joins cults? Why do people stay in cults? What is daily life in a cult like? What should we as a society do about cults? How do we study cults? Criminal Justice elective; GEP Social Science

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 369 Basic Crim Intelligence Analys (3 credits)

This course teaches the basic principles of Intelligence Analysis, as practiced by the CIA, FBI, DEA and other Federal, State and Local law enforcement agencies. The course covers deductive logic, development of inferences, hypothesis development and testing, sources of information, and analytical techniques e.g. matrix development and link analysis. Upon completion of this course you will be eligible to join the International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA). Criminal Justice elective.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 375 Electronic Intelligence Analys (3 credits)

The course will use computer technology and analytical software tools (with emphasis on Analyst Notebook 6) to process and compare data. Analyst Notebook is the program currently being used by the CIA, FBI, NSA, US Army, INS, Customs, Secret Service, Homeland Security, DEA and1500 other National, State and Local Law Enforcement agencies throughout the world, to combat Terrorism, Drug Smuggling, Money Laundering and Organized Crime. This is a hands-on course where students will be learning to visualize complex relationships, analyze large data sets, and communicate findings to develop tactical and strategic intelligence. Basic Criminal Intelligence Analysis, SOC 369, is a prerequisite for this course. Criminal Justice elective.

Prerequisites: SOC 369

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 377 Inside-Out Expl Crime&Justice (3 credits)

This class offers a unique opportunity to explore issues of crime and justice from inside a correctional facility. The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program brings together students from Saint Joseph’s University and adult students who are incarcerated to learn about and discuss topics such as the causes of crime, victims, the rationale of the criminal justice system, and restorative justice. Through the readings and dialogue, inside and outside students will be able to integrate their theoretical knowledge with lived experiences. It is through this exchange that we hope to critically analyze and challenge the current system in the U.S. that has resulted in a higher incarceration rate than other similar countries. Criminal Justice elective

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 378 Urban and Public Policy (3 credits)

This course will offer a foundation in how sociologists study cities and public policy. We will examine assets of cities and key areas of need that cities face (such as education, poverty, housing, and crime), and we will study policy options to improve cities and their larger metropolitan areas. These are broad policy areas of study, so we will hone in on specific policies. For example, we will explore how cities have formulated their initiatives to end homelessness, we will consider juvenile justice alternatives, and we will look at how cities can position themselves to be sustainable in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Faith-Justice, GEP SS, Criminal Justice elective. Satisfies Africana Studies requirement.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 379 Soc of Intn'l Law & Politics (3 credits)

SOC 386 Violence in Intimate Relations (3 credits)

Women and children have a higher probability of being seriously injured or killed by someone with whom they are intimately associated rather than by a stranger. This course will examine questions such as: What factors contribute to the prevalence of intimate violence in the U.S.? How does intimate violence differ across groups (e.g., by race/ethnicity, social class)? How are 456 various forms of intimate violence (i.e., partner abuse, child abuse, elder abuse) interrelated?

SOC 390 Special Topics (3 credits)

SOC 470 Special Topics (3 credits)

Course content determined by instructor. Past topics included: Women’s Rights, Extremist Movements, The Ethical Consumer. For senior Criminal Justice and Sociology majors only.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Senior. Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Criminal Justice or Sociology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 490 Internship (3,6 credits)

The student is placed according to his/her interests in a criminal justice, social service, or health care setting for a semester. In this way, he/she may apply classroom-acquired skills and knowledge while gaining practical work experience. Permission of internship director required.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 491 Internship (3-12 credits)

The student is placed according to his/her interests in a criminal justice, social service, or health care setting for a semester. In this way, he/she may apply classroom-acquired skills and knowledge while gaining practical work experience. Permission of internship director required.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 493 Independent Research in SOC (3 credits)

SOC 494 Independent Research Sociology (3 credits)

SOC 495 Seminar I (3 credits)

This course is where students complete the required senior thesis. An Honors section is available for those students completing College Honors. Prerequisite: SOC 313 and ENG 101.

Prerequisites: SOC 313 and ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

SOC 497 College Honors Indept Study (3 credits)

College Honors candidates in Sociology will complete a second honors course during the Spring of the senior year (SOC 497) which includes research, extending the senior capstone experience beyond what non-Honor students complete.