History

Department Overview

The History Department offers a signature course in the General Education Program (GEP) that is required of all undergraduates at the University. HIS 154, Forging the Modern World, provides students with the opportunity to use the tools of historical inquiry to gain insight on the key events, ideas, individuals and groups that have shaped the world in which we live. The Department’s advanced courses continue to emphasize the investigation of the ideas and institutions—religious, political, social, and economic—through which people have endeavored to order their world. Advanced courses, with their more precise focus on place, time, and method, allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the field and its practices. The Department also offers internships and independent research opportunities to enhance students' preparation for the future.

Professor: James Carter, Ph.D.; Katherine A. S. Sibley, Ph.D.; Randall M. Miller, Ph.D.
Associate: Alison Williams Lewin, Ph.D.; Melissa Chakars, Ph.D.
Assistant: Amber Abbas, Ph.D.; Brian James Yates, Ph.D.; Christopher W. Close, Ph.D.; Jeffrey Hyson, Ph.D.
Visiting: Leslie Rogne Schumacher, Ph.D., FRSA

Chair: Carter

Undergraduate Major

Undergraduate Minor

HIS 100 Forging the Modern World (3 credits)

HIS 101 Western Civ 1 (3 credits)

HIS 102 Western Civ 2 (3 credits)

HIS 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

HIS 154 Forging the Modern World (3 credits)

Students will analyze primary and secondary sources to understand the predominant structures and relationships that have transformed our world from the early modern era to the twentieth century. Topics will include the development of political and economic ideas and systems (e.g., democracy, liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, fascism, colonialism, capitalism, socialism), changing conceptions of culture and identity (e.g. race, gender, ethnicity, art), and the conflicts and opportunities born of this transformation (e.g., anti-colonial movements, social revolutions, world wars, international organizations, globalization, religious and cultural conflicts). Readings and discussions will emphasize understanding how modern systems of political, economic and social meaning and exchange, including Western dominance, emerged.

Attributes: Signature Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 160 Topics in Global History (3 credits)

HIS 196 AP World History Credit (3 credits)

HIS 200 Historical Methods (3 credits)

HIS 201 American History to 1877 (3 credits)

A survey dealing with the origin and development of American institutions and traditions, with emphasis on the political, economic, and social history of the period after 1763. These courses may be taken in any order.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 202 American Hist. 1865 to Present (3 credits)

A survey dealing with the origin and development of American institutions and traditions, with emphasis on the political, economic, and social history of the period after 1763. These courses may be taken in any order.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 203 Historical Intro to Latin Am (3 credits)

A survey of the development of Latin American society, emphasizing the era from the independence movements of the nineteenth century to the present day. The course will focus on the changing social, economic and political structures of the region. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 204 Latin American-U.S. Migration (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes that led migrants from Latin America and the Caribbean to the United States, and their experiences after arrival. The course focuses on three interdisciplinary topics: community formation; the variety of individual and group experiences; and current policy questions for the hemisphere. This course has been designated as an ethics intensive and diversity course under the GEP. Latin American Studies.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Faith Justice Course, International Relations Course, Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 205 His Intro to the Islamic World (3 credits)

The course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the Islamic world from the seventh century to the present, including: the expansion and consolidation of Islamic states; relations with Western powers; the rise and fall of empires; and social, cultural, and intellectual developments.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 206 Historical Intro to East Asia (3 credits)

HIS 207 Historical Intro to South Asia (3 credits)

HIS 208 Historical Intro to Asian Civ (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the culture, politics, geography, art, and religious traditions of the major countries of East and South Asia. It will also give a historical overview from earliest times to the present. The course will focus primarily on the Indian subcontinent, China and Japan, with some attention also to Korea and Southeast Asia. Throughout the course students will also learn how questions of history and culture shape identities and animate public life in contemporary Asia.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 209 AP European History Credit (3 credits)

Students who receive a 4 or 5 on the AP European History exam, or the IB equivalent, will receive credit for this course.

Attributes: International Relations Course

HIS 210 Historical Intro to Mod.Africa (3 credits)

This course will examine the social, political, and economic history of Africa from pre-colonial times to the twentieth century. It will emphasize themes such as the early formation of states and empires, the impact of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, the European colonization of the continent, and the struggles and successes of modern African nation states. The course is designed to provide the students with a background for understanding the most important forces that have shaped Africa and continue to affect the lives of people throughout the continent. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 211 Historical Intro Pre-ModAfrica (3 credits)

HIS 239 Ireland 1798-1998 (3 credits)

HIS 296 AP World History Credit (3 credits)

HIS 301 United States and Latin Am (3 credits)

An exploration of the complex relationship between the United States and the Latin American nations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 302 Colonial Mexico (3 credits)

This Course examines social and cultural relations and conflicts in the Spanish colony that later became Mexico and the southwestern United States. Emphasis is placed on the seventeenth and eighteenth century. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 303 History of Modern Mexico (3 credits)

A study of the major social, political, and economic factors that have shaped Mexico in the twentieth century. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP. Latin American Studies.

Prerequisites: (HIS 1521 or HIS 203) and (HIS 1571 or HIS 206)

Attributes: International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 304 Social Protest in Latin Am His (3 credits)

An examination of upheaval in Latin American history, from village riots to social revolutions. Students will analyze relevant theoretical and historiographical literature on social protest and explore case studies that will test the explanatory strength of these different models. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 310 Modern Germany (3 credits)

This course will enable students to assimilate historians’ differing conceptions regarding exceptionalism in German history and to examine key political, economic, and cultural developments in Germany over the past two hundred years. Students will contemplate how one might go about de-provincializing German history by situating the varying iterations of German nationhood in a wider European and global context.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 311 Nazism & Fascism Global Persp (3 credits)

HIS 314 Living in Ancient Med World (3 credits)

HIS 315 The Glory that was Greece (3 credits)

From Homer to Alexander, the Greeks of antiquity made their mark on the world both of their own time and of the present. While many know the names of great philosophers and artists, such as Plato and Sophocles, few are acquainted with the historical circumstances that often served to inspire these founders of Western civilization. Through original historical and literary texts, this course will help students better to understand the complex context of military prowess, intellectual curiosity, and artistic inspiration that created the glory that was Greece. This course satisfies the Art/Lit requirement under the GEP.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 316 The Grandeur that was Rome (3 credits)

From its beginnings as a muddy village, Rome grew to create the largest empire and greatest uniformity the Western world has ever known. This course will: trace the course of Rome’s development in the areas of military, political, social and legal history; examine the effects of Christianity and endless expansion upon the empire; and critically assess various theories explaining its demise. This course has been designated as writing intensive within the GEP.

Prerequisites: HIS 154

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, European Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 317 The Rise of the West: 400-1200 (3 credits)

In recent years, scholarly debate has raged over the effects of "The Fall of Rome"; what was once viewed as a catastrophe faces re-evaluation from historians, archeologists, and sociologists. The slow merger of Roman, barbarian, and Christian cultures created a unique civilization, focused intently on survival in this world and salvation in the next. The course will examine the mental and physical constructs of this civilization, with the goal of appreciating the extraordinary creativity of a society with few hard and fast rules or institutions to guide it. This course has been designated as writing intensive under the GEP.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HIS 318 Italian Renaissance 1100-1600 (3 credits)

Extraordinary creativity in all arenas flourished in Italy during the Renaissance. New forms of political theory and organization, finance, art, literature and views about human nature itself all drew on Roman and medieval traditions, and bloomed against a backdrop of constant warfare. The course will examine the formation and evolution of the northern Italian city-states and the culture they created. This course has been designated as writing intensive within the GEP.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 319 Reform/Rev in Europe 1500-1650 (3 credits)

Through readings in primary and secondary sources, combined with weekly classroom discussions, this course will encourage students to decide for themselves how “revolutionary” the Reformation was. We will examine the historical roots of the Protestant Reformation and analyze the extent to which it was traditional and innovative. We will investigate the Reformation’s impact on the religious practice of regular people during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as the works of the Reformers and the Catholic Church’s response. Finally, we will look at the long-term effects of the Reformation on European society and attempt to evaluate it as a motor of modernity. This course has been designated as a Faith-Reason course under the GEP.

Prerequisites: PHL 154 and (THE 154 or THE 221)

Attributes: Faith-Reason Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 320 Absltsm & Enlghtnmnt:1650-1789 (3 credits)

Ideas of human freedom and individual rights first spread widely while states attempted to impose strict controls on their subjects. The course will examine the works of absolutist and Enlightenment thinkers, the political machinery of the (would-be) absolutist state, the tensions and accommodations between the two, and the culture and society that surrounded them.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 321 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 credits)

This course will examine the causes of the French Revolution of 1789, the revolutionary governments and the Napoleonic era.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 322 Europe in 20th Cent, 1914-1939 (3 credits)

A study of the First World War and its impact upon the general course of European history, as well as a treatment of the political, economic, social, and diplomatic history of the period between the world wars.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 323 Europe in 20th Cent, Since1939 (3 credits)

A course emphasizing the Second World War and the recovery of Europe in the post-war era.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 324 Modern International Socialism (3 credits)

HIS 325 France 1814-1914 (3 credits)

A study of political, diplomatic, social, economic and religious trends from the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte to the outbreak of the First World War.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 326 The Age of Empire (3 credits)

A study of European imperialism and anti-imperialism in Africa and Asia from the late eighteenth century to the present, with special emphasis on the nineteenth century and on the British Empire.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 327 Trans in Early Mod Europe (3 credits)

This course examines some of the key transformations in European history between the years 1400-1800. This period is commonly referred to by historians as “Early Modern Europe,” a term that may seem somewhat odd to us who claim to live in a “modern” world. This course will investigate the term early modern, testing what it means and whether or not it is an appropriate label to place on a period encompassing four centuries. Topics will include the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Dutch Revolt, the English Civil War, European encounters with the “New World,” Absolutism and the rise of the nation state, the Scientific Revolution, the French Revolution, and many more.

Attributes: Medieval, Ren & Reform Studies, Undergraduate

HIS 328 European Dipl His, 1814-1914 (3 credits)

HIS 329 Crime & Punishment (3 credits)

This course analyzes the development of European crime and punishment from 1200-1840. It explores the evolution of different legal traditions by comparing the growth of inquisitorial procedures in continental Europe to the practice of common law in England. It examines in detail the social role of judicial torture, physical punishment, and public execution in European society. The operation of large institutional court systems such as the Roman and Spanish inquisitions receive great attention, with students reenacting a series of trials from Spanish Inquisition courts. After investigating the legal backdrop to sensational crimes such as regicide and witchcraft, the course concludes by studying the shift away from physical punishment toward punishment by prison in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries through the lens of Philadelphia’s own relic of the criminal justice past, Eastern State Penitentiary.

Attributes: European Studies Course, Medieval, Ren & Reform Studies

HIS 330 Eng: Danes to Tudors, 700-1485 (3 credits)

This course will examine the ways in which official decrees—royal, noble, and ecclesiastical—affected people in all walks of life, and will furthermore explore the various roles English men and women constructed for themselves. In so doing, students will gain insight into the ways inhabitants of this island thought of themselves and the world around them.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 331 Tudor-Stuart Eng, 1485-1714 (3 credits)

Age of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. Topics include Henry VIII and the Reformation, Elizabethan England, Puritanism, the English Civil War, Cromwell, the Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, the growth of the early modern state, the scientific revolution, social change, and cultural life.

Attributes: European Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 332 Age of Aristcy: Brit 1689-1832 (3 credits)

The evolution of Britain from a preindustrial toward an industrial society between the Glorious Revolution and the first reform of Parliament; the political world of the Stuart and Hanoverian oligarchy; the industrial revolution; the Empire, particularly the British Atlantic world, and slavery; the Evangelical revival; radical social and political movements; warfare and the consolidation of British national identity; reform and the unraveling of the confessional state in the years after Waterloo; the arts, from Classical to Romantic.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 333 Victorian Britain, 1815-1901 (3 credits)

The course is a study of Britain from 1815 to 1901 transformed by the urban and industrial revolutions; the growth of the modern state; social and political reforms; the evolution of the Liberal and Conservative parties; religious, cultural, and intellectual developments; labor movements; British foreign policy and growth of the British Empire.

Attributes: European Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 334 Twentieth Century Britain (3 credits)

Topics will include Edwardian England; Armageddon, 1914-1918; the trials of the inter-war years and appeasement; the Finest Hour, 1939-1945; from Empire to Commonwealth to European Union; the welfare state and the politics of prosperity.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 335 Germany: Fr Rev through WWI (3 credits)

This course will examine the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon on the German states, the development of the German Confederation and the Zollverein, the contest between Austria and Prussia for German leadership, the Bismarck era and the rule of William II.

Attributes: European Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 336 The Weimar Repblc & Nazi Germy (3 credits)

This course will focus on the German Revolution of 1918, the creation, development and collapse of the Weimar Republic, the rise of Adolf Hitler and the history of the twelve-year Third Reich.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 337 History of Russia, 1682-1881 (3 credits)

A survey of the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Russia from Kievan Russia to the emancipation of the serfs. Topics will include Kievan Rus; the Golden Horde; the Rise of Muscovy; the consolidation of the Romanov autocracy; the expansion of the empire; and the Great Reforms.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 338 Russia-Soviet Union 1861-1991 (3 credits)

A survey of the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments of the Russian Empire from 1861 to 1917 and of the Soviet Union from its foundation to its break-up in 1991. Topics will include the decline of tsarism; the Russian revolutions; Stalinism; World War II; the Cold War; the "thaw years" under Khrushchev; the "stagnation years" under Brezhnev; and the reforms under Gorbachev.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 339 The Mongol Empire 1100-1500 (3 credits)

In the thirteenth century, the Mongols built the largest contiguous land empire the world has ever known. This course will cover the rise, running, and fall of this empire. It will explore the society and culture of the Mongols, the world's most famous nomadic conquerors. In addition, the course will examine how the Mongol Empire impacted the course of Eurasian history. It will explore how the empire affected not only the Mongols themselves, but also the many peoples whom they conquered. This course has been designated as a non- western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 340 Stalinism 1920 to 1950 (3 credits)

This course examines the Soviet Union under the leadership of Joseph Stalin from 1928 to 1953. This period was repressive, but also transformative. The course will address not only the suffering inflicted by Stalin's steep repression, but also the social, cultural, and economic impact of his policies. Course readings will focus on the experiences of ordinary people to demonstrate that Stalin’s rule brought both opportunity, as well as great tragedy. Stalinism, historians argue, was more than a political ideology such as Marxism and Leninism, but a way of life and civilization distinct from anything the modern world had yet experienced.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 341 Genocide/Human Rights 20th Cen (3 credits)

Examines and compares four twentieth-century genocides: the Turkish genocide of the Armenians (1915-1917), the Holocaust (1933-1945), the Pol Pot genocide in Cambodia (1976-1979), and the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda (1994). The course will explore the concept of genocide and the development of national and global laws to prevent it, promote human rights, and prosecute abusers. In doing so, it will offer a historiography of genocide studies. Also, through primary and secondary source readings, students will study genocidal violence as a particularly vicious form of state policy and also as a human and personal experience of terror and murder.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP)

HIS 343 African Ethnicities (3 credits)

This course is designed to inform students on not only the general schools of ethnic construction, but also Africa’s unique contribution to the development of the field. There will be several case studies given in the class which represent some of the extremely varied African experiences with ethnicity. In this course students will develop an understanding of ethnic construction that can be used as a foundation for further inquiry. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP)

HIS 344 The Middle East Since 1798 (3 credits)

HIS 345 Africa: Trans Atlan Slave Trd. (3 credits)

HIS 346 Rel Thought & Phil in Afr Comm (3 credits)

This class will examine the role of religious thought and cultural philosophies in conflict and peace in Africa. The class will begin as a survey of the history, cultures and religions of Africa. After which, several case studies will be presented that put specific North-African interpretations of Judaism, Islam, Christianity or traditionalist beliefs at the center of either conflict or consensus in this region.. A final extended case study will examine the Somali, where one has a unity of language, culture and religion, but due to decades of civil wars, no functional state. These case studies will focus on the specific religious beliefs or practices that either endeared religious groups to each other or transcended religious denominations to provide concrete examples for the ways in which the proponents of faiths and secularity coexist or cause conflict in Africa.

Attributes: Faith-Reason Course (New GEP), International Relations Course

HIS 347 Beyond Hercules:Spain&Portgual (3 credits)

HIS 348 Witch, Law & Suprnat Early Eur (3 credits)

This course will examine popular and educated belief in the supernatural during the early modern period in Europe, beginning with late medieval concepts of magic and finishing with the end of witchcraft trials during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It will focus especially on the "witch-craze" that occurred across Europe and its American colonies during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Readings will include trial records, journals, and demonology tracts, as well as secondary sources treating witchcraft as a crucial component of early modern beliefs about law, religion, and culture.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 349 Irish His.Place of Sml Country (3 credits)

HIS 350 Exchng & Conq in Mod E. Asia (3 credits)

This course is a chronological survey of East Asian history from 1500 to the present, emphasizing the reciprocal influences of East Asia and the West. The primary focus will be on China and Japan, with attention also to Korea and Vietnam. Major topics will include the Jesuits in East Asia; approaches to modernization in China and Japan; the decline of China and the rise of Japan in the nineteenth century; colonialism and anti-colonial movements; the challenges of global culture; and debates over human rights in the late twentieth century.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 351 Gndr, Ideolgy & Rev in E. Asia (3 credits)

This course will examine the institutional and ideological connections between gender roles and social unrest in East Asia since 1600, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. Questions central to the class will be: changing notions of the ideal man and woman, and how changes in society and politics have been reflected in gender roles for men and women. Topics may include traditional East Asian societies; foot binding; revolutionary movements including communism, nationalism and feminism; family-planning; the Japanese samurai ideal; and gender roles in film and fiction.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 352 Late Imperial China (3 credits)

Chinese social, political, intellectual, and cultural history during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Major topics will include Ming voyages of discovery, Ming art and literature, the Manchu conquest, War of the Three Feudatories, Taiping Rebellion, and the advent of Western imperialism. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 353 Modern China (3 credits)

Chinese social, political, intellectual, and cultural history from 1900 to 2000. Major topics will include the Opium Wars, emergence of Chinese nationalism, the Boxer Rebellion, collapse and fall of the Qing dynasty, the May Fourth Movement in literature and politics, competing strands of Chinese communism, warlords, the anti- Japanese war, the founding of the People’s Republic, the Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, Deng Xiaoping’s Reforms, social protest of the 1980s, and the challenges of rapid economic development. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 354 Japan Since 1800 (3 credits)

The central theme of this course is the coexistence of traditional and modern Japan during the last 200 years. Major topics include traditional Japanese social structure, bushido and samurai culture, Perry and the opening of Japan, the Meiji Restoration, militarism and modernization, expansion onto the Asian continent, Showa democracy, the Pacific War, the American Occupation, political and economic reconstruction, cinema and literature of post-war Japan. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 355 Clnlism & Ntnlism SE Asia (3 credits)

This course will focus on the experience of colonialism and the development of independent modern nation- states in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Indonesia, and to a lesser extent, Malaysia, Singapore, Burma, and the Philippines. The course seeks to help students understand how colonialism redefined pre-existing relations among the peoples of the region and how modern nationalism and independence movements emerged in this context. Although political and economic interests are essential parts of this story, the course will focus on intellectual, cultural, and social factors.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 356 Modern South Asia (3 credits)

The nation-states of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Nepal and the Maldive Islands (and sometimes Afghanistan)—comprise incredible diversity of language, culture, religion, art, dress, architecture, and cuisine. This course places the region into historical, political and socio-economic context. It offers a thematic and chronological study of modern South Asia with thorough examinations of the British colonial period, the movements for independence and the social activism that grew out of them. The course will then examine selected topics in contemporary South Asia including gender, caste, minorities, territorial/ sovereignty conflicts, popular culture and film, development economies, and the South Asian diaspora. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 357 History of Islam in Asia (3 credits)

This course explores the early history of Islam, and the ways it grew beyond the Arabian peninsula and ultimately took hold in Central, South, Southeast Asia and East Asia. The course examines the expansion of Islam throughout Asia, its relationship with existing systems and geo-politics, the relationship between Islam and statecraft, and questions of gender, identity, belonging as well as the pressures of globalization, including the most current events affecting Asian Muslims.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 358 Contemporary China (3 credits)

The history of China since 1976. Major topics covered will be the death of Mao and the end of the Cultural Revolution; the opening of relations with the United States; Deng Xiaoping's rise; opening and reform; China's "economic miracle"; the one-third policy; the 1989 democracy movement and its aftermath; China's rise as a global economic and political power; the environmental challenge accompanying China's economic development; and the Communist Party's strategies and tactics to maintain power. Usually offered as part of the SJU-in-China summer program. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 359 India & Pak: Colony to Nation (3 credits)

This course will examine the emergence of anti-imperialists and nationalist leaders and the evolution of their thinking; the politics of Indian nationalism; Muslim nationalism; the history of the partition and its reverberations and the challenges of state building after independence from Britain. This course has been designated as a non-western studies course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 360 Colonial America (3 credits)

A survey of the social, economic, cultural, and political developments in colonial America with special emphasis on the origins and evolution of the plantation system, slavery, religious diversity, cities, and scientific inquiry.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 361 Amer Hist in Age of Revolution (3 credits)

A survey of American history from the era of the American Revolution through the mid-nineteenth century with special emphasis on Independence, the 1800 revolution in politics, the transportation, agricultural, and industrial revolutions, and the social revolution accompanying modernization in the nineteenth century.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 362 The Civil War Era (3 credits)

A survey of the middle period of American history with special emphasis on the Civil War and Reconstruction— the causes, management, and consequences of the war in society, economics, politics, and culture. This course has been designated as an ethics intensive course under the GEP.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, American Studies Course, Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 363 The Elections of 2020 (3 credits)

An analysis of the presidential, congressional, and gubernatorial races of 2020. The course will offer the student a basis for understanding the ongoing election cycle of 2020, especially drawing upon the changes that have taken place in American politics since the 1980s and the history of electioneering in America, especially in the modern era. This will include discussion of partisan realignment, the growing importance of personality and interest group politics, and the role of issues in influencing electoral choice. Particular attention will be devoted to understanding the tactics and strategies of the two major parties as they position themselves for and then campaign in the Elections of 2020.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 364 Ethnic America (3 credits)

A survey of the development of cities and the process of urbanization in America with special emphasis on urban institutions—government, police, voluntary associations—and the changing character and functions of cities in the modern period.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 365 Urban America (3 credits)

A survey of the development of cities and the process of urbanization in America with special emphasis on urban institutions—government, police, voluntary associations—and the changing character and functions of cities in the modern period.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 366 Progressive Era to New Deal (3 credits)

Reform affected all levels of U.S. politics and society in the first half of the twentieth century, linking the first Roosevelt administration to the last. Besides cleaning up at home, Progressives and New Dealers also tried to save the world abroad with varying success. This course will examine the origins, nature, contradictions and social and political consequences of these important Reforming Decades.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 367 Postwar Am, 1945 to the Presnt (3 credits)

This course will explore recent American history through an examination of political, social, and cultural developments, with particular emphases on the expanding role of the presidency, social movements embracing racial, class, and gender issues, and emerging cultural crosscurrents since World War II.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 368 Am Ideas: Col Era to Civil War (3 credits)

This course explores the history of American thought and culture from the Puritans to the Civil War, largely through primary source readings by major intellectual figures. The emphasis will be on social, political, and religious thought, but students will also discuss developments and trends in the arts, literature, and philosophy. Key topics include Puritanism and revivalism; liberalism, republicanism, and democracy; cultural nationalism and Transcendentalism; and abolitionism and antebellum reform.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 369 Am Ideas: Gilded Age to Pres (3 credits)

This course explores the history of American thought and culture from the late nineteenth century to the present, largely through primary source readings by major intellectual figures. The emphasis will be on social and political thought, but students will also discuss developments and trends in philosophy religion, the arts, and literature. Key topics include Victorianism and modernism; pragmatism and Progressivism; liberalism and conservatism; and postmodernism and multiculturalism.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 370 Topics in History (3 credits)

The course introduces students to recent theoretical or practical topics of interest in history. Content and structure of the course are determined by the course supervisor. The special topic(s) for a given semester will be announced prior to registration.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 371 Directed Readings in Asian His (3 credits)

HIS 372 Directed Rdgs in European His (3 credits)

HIS 379 Afr Amer Hist Since Civil War (3 credits)

This course will explore the history of African-Americans from Reconstruction to the present day. Students will examine the unity and diversity of the African-American experience, including the myriad social, cultural, political, and economic conditions that created this experience, the ways in which African-Americans have shaped American history and culture, and African-American efforts, in concert with other Americans, to subvert, transcend, and otherwise reform a discriminatory landscape and reassert the founding principles of the American republic.

Prerequisites: HIS 154

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 380 Am Foreign Policy, 1775-1914 (3 credits)

This course explores the origins of United States foreign relations from their earliest days during the Revolution until the First World War. The course takes a broad approach, embracing such issues as independence, expansion, sectionalism, nationalism, idealism and imperialism.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 381 US in the World, Wilson-Reagan (3 credits)

This course covers the enhanced profile of the United States in the world from 1917 until the end of the Cold War. The nation’s transformation from a hesitant embrace of international commitments to an expansive vision of global involvement is a major theme, as are the resultant crusades and conflicts this generated domestically.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

HIS 382 American Foreign Policy (3 credits)

This course offers an interdisciplinary perspective on the United States’s role in global events emphasizing both historical understanding and theoretical approaches. Beginning with World War I, the course will develop major themes and challenges for U.S. foreign policy in the 20th century and beyond: isolationism vs. internationalism, hegemony vs. empire, citizens’ rights vs. state interests, and the extent to which the pursuit of national security (national power and prosperity) should recognize ethical limits.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 383 Food in American History (3 credits)

Examines how food has shaped and reflected American culture, society, economy, and politics.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 384 The Civil Rights Mov in Am (3 credits)

A survey of the modern civil rights movement in the United States, with special emphasis on the desegregation struggles in the American South and the personalities, strategies, and ideologies of the civil rights movement as it became a national movement through the 1960s and 1970s.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 385 His of Women in Am Since 1820 (3 credits)

This course will explore the history of American women from the beginnings of the antebellum period to the dawn of the post-Cold War era. It will focus upon the evolution of women’s family and work roles as well as their involvement in social reform and political movements and will emphasize both the unity and the diversity of women’s historical experiences, based upon factors such as race, ethnicity, class, and region. (DGNW overlay)

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 386 American Environmental History (3 credits)

This course will describe our historical place in the natural landscape. It will tell that story through the methods of "environmental history," examining ecological relationships between humans and nature, political and economic influences on the environment, and cultural conceptions of the natural world. Drawing on methods from the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, the course will survey over 500 years of North American environmental history, with topics ranging from urban pollution and suburban sprawl to agricultural practices and wilderness protection.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 387 Popular Culture in the US (3 credits)

This course will explore the production and consumption of commercialized leisure in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. Throughout the nation’s history, American popular culture has both reflected and shaped society’s values, often serving as an arena of conflict among classes, races, and genders. By investigating selected sites on this contested terrain—from novels, stage shows, and movies to radio, television, and popular music—students will learn to think seriously, critically, and historically about the mass-produced culture that surrounds us every day.

Attributes: Communication Studies ILC Crs, Undergraduate

HIS 388 Reacting to the Past (3 credits)

This course will immerse students in moments of historical controversy through a series of extended role- playing games. By reading primary sources, conducting additional research, and participating in first-person debates, students will develop a more active, engaged, and empathetic understanding of both historic events and historical practice. Students will also participate in the play testing of new "Reacting" games, thereby contributing to the development of an innovative interactive pedagogy.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 389 Gender/Sexuality Mod Euro & US (3 credits)

HIS 391 American Military History (3 credits)

This course assesses the development of the American military from the period of the Spanish-American War to the present. Emphasis will be placed on growth and change in the military within a broader social, political and economic context.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 394 Middle East (3 credits)

HIS 458 Epidemiology (3 credits)

HIS 460 Research Seminars (3 credits)

HIS 462 Seminar in European History (3 credits)

HIS 470 Seminar in American History (3 credits)

Lectures, readings, and discussions focusing on an announced theme in United States history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected theme.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 471 Seminar in American History (3 credits)

HIS 472 Seminar in European History (3 credits)

Lectures, readings, and discussion focusing on an announced theme in European history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected theme. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course, and an ethics intensive course under the GEP.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), European Studies Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HIS 473 Seminar in Eurasian History (3 credits)

Lectures, readings, and discussion focusing on an announced theme in Latin American history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected theme. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course under the GEP.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and HIS 154

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 474 Seminar in Latin Am His (3 credits)

Lectures, readings, and discussion focusing on an announced theme in Latin American history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected theme. Latin American Studies. Latin American Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 475 Seminar in Latin Am His (3 credits)

HIS 476 Seminar in Asian History (3 credits)

Lecture, readings, and discussion focusing on an announced theme in Asian history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected them. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course under the GEP.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, Undergraduate

HIS 477 Seminar in African History (3 credits)

Lectures, readings, and discussion focusing on an announced theme in African history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected theme. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course under the GEP.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

HIS 478 Seminar in Global/Comp His (3 credits)

Lectures, readings and discussion focusing on an announced theme in global and/or comparative history. Each student undertakes a major research project associated with the selected theme. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course under the GEP.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in History.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HIS 479 Seminar in Global/Comp His (3 credits)

HIS 480 Directed Readings in Amer Hist (3 credits)

HIS 481 Directed Rdgs in European Hist (3 credits)

HIS 482 Directed Rdgs in Asian Hist (3 credits)

HIS 483 Directed Rdgs in African Hist (3 credits)

HIS 484 Directed Rdgs in Latin Am Hist (3 credits)

HIS 489 Directed Readings (3 credits)

HIS 491 Philadelphia Area Internship (3 credits)

The Philadelphia Area Internship Program supports student internships in public sector, private sector, and non- government organizations. The course focuses on developing multiple skills. Students work at the organization a designated number of hours per week, keep a journal, read and analyze materials relevant to their internships, and produce written work that connects their internship experiences with relevant scholarly research. This course has been designated as writing-intensive under the GEP.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HIS 493 Honors Resrch and Ind Study I (3 credits)

Independent research leading to the successful completion and defense of an Honors Thesis.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HIS 494 Honors Research & Ind Study II (3 credits)

Independent research leading to the successful completion and defense of an Honors Thesis.

Attributes: Undergraduate