Classics (CLA)

CLA 201 Love,Sex,Conqst:Classic Myth (3 credits)

Study and interpretation of the sources, nature, and function of Greek and Roman mythology, including its major story patterns, divine and human figures, and recurrent themes; exploration of the significance and uses of mythology and mythic symbolism; understanding and appreciation of the continuing significance of classical mythology in literature, the arts, and modern popular culture. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 202 Classical Epic: Gods & Heroes (3 credits)

We will engage in reading, discussion and analysis of the Greek epic poems of Homer (Iliad and Odyssey), Hesiod (Works and Days), and the Roman epic of Virgil (Aeneid). We will consider important questions and topics arising from a reading of Homer, such as the identity of the poet and his society, his depiction of Late Bronze Age "heroic" values, the "oral" and "formular" nature of Homeric language, Homeric theology, Mycenaean civilization and the historical/archaeological evidence for the Trojan War. We will then consider Hesiod's response to Homer's warrior society and values in his Works and Days, and Virgil's reshaping of Homeric epic conventions and promotion of Augustan policy and ideals in his Aeneid. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 203 Classical Tragedy (3 credits)

This course features reading in English of several original tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students discuss the nature and character of the gods in these plays as well as the interactions and relationships between human and divine characters. The class also evaluates the often expressed idea that the texts of Greek tragedy and comedy reflect an Athenian society in crisis. The class will explore how various forms of upheaval in politics, education, religion, and domestic life are reflected in Athenian drama, and also how the Athenian playwrights may be commenting on these issues. Another significant topic of examination is the tendency of Athenian tragedy to feature characters that rebel against or subvert traditional Athenian gender roles. We discuss in each case what these reversals reveal about the characters and what consequences arise from these reversals. In order to assist students in visualizing the dramas, the instructor will show images from ancient Greek theatres at Athens and Epidauros and scenes from the famous National Theatre of Great Britain production of Aeschylus’ Oresteria (directed by Peter Hall, with actors performing in masks) and the equally famous Kennedy Center production of Euripides’ Medea. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 204 Comedy: Ancient and Modern (3 credits)

CLA 204 Ancient Comedy (3 credits) This course features reading in English of several original comedies of Aristophanes and Plautus. The class explores the “Old Comedy” of Aristophanes with its topical satire and also evaluates the often expressed idea that the texts of Greek tragedy and comedy reflect an Athenian society in crisis. The class will consider how various forms of upheaval in politics, education, religion, and domestic life are reflected in Athenian drama, and also how Aristophanes may be commenting on these issues. We will then study the development of comedy at Rome and its debt to Greek “New Comedy,” its staging and performance, and its conventional themes and stock characters. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 205 Ancient Rome: Art & Arch (3 credits)

CLA 206 Sports in the Ancient World (3 credits)

The purpose of the course is to explore the genesis and significance of athletics in ancient Greece and Rome with an emphasis on its socio-historical context. It will also examine how the parameters of participation and competition in ancient sports inform modern day athletic practices. The course will rely on primary literary sources, archaeology, and secondary scholarship in order to reconstruct the customs and beliefs pertaining to ancient athletics. Topics to be discussed during the semester include: the history of the ancient Olympics; other major athletic events organized in Greece (Pythian, Isthmian, and Nemean); the relationship between religion and sports in antiquity; ancient perceptions of gender and sports; pederasty and the context of the gymnasium; women in ancient athletics; Athenian vs. Spartan athletics; professional and amateur athletes; Greek athletics under the Romans; Roman spectacles; athletics and politics in the ancient world; and the role of ancient athletics in the history of the modern Olympic games. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

CLA 301 Mystery&Monument:Ancnt Greece (3 credits)

This course examines the material culture remains of various cities prominent in the history of Greece. Knossos, the main city of the island of Crete, Troy, and Mycenae are among the sites studied for their importance in the Bronze Age (3000-1100 BCE). After a detailed study of Greek architecture and the evolution of key building types such as the temple, the stoa, and the theater, students explore the material remains of Olympia, Delphi, and Athens. The myths associated with these cities are also included. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, European Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 302 Mystery&Monument:Ancient Rome (3 credits)

An introduction to the art and archaeology of Roman Italy, which will explore through digital images the major surviving monuments of Rome and its environs, of the Etruscans, and of other famous sites in Italy. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 303 Pompeii & Herculaneum (3 credits)

This course examines the archaeological evidence of the ancient Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, and also literary and epigraphical evidence from the Roman world, to bring to light various aspects of daily life in the Roman empire in the first century AD, including politics, religion, art, housing, entertainment, and industry. It is recommended that the student has taken CLA 1121 Art and Archaeology of Italy. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 304 Etruscan Art and Archaeology (3 credits)

At one time the masters of the Italian archipelago, the Etruscans have suffered at the pens of historians both ancient and modern; in redressing the record, archaeology has opened as many problems as it has solved. The Etruscans’ non-Indo-European language, wealth and technology set them apart from their Italic and Greek neighbors; though Romans adopted Etruscan religious doctrine and material culture, they ultimately conquered and eliminated this unique culture. This course examines the ancient written sources and the latest archaeological discoveries, from painted tombs and bronze armor to DNA, to identify the character of Etruscan civilization from 1000 BC to the days of Augustus, as well as its modern heritage. "Hands-on" visits to the world-class Etruscan collection in the University of Pennsylvania Museum will supplement illustrated lectures. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, European Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 305 Cleopatra Thrgh Anc & Mod Eyes (3 credits)

The last pharaoh of Egypt was also the first of its Macedonian rulers to speak the Egyptian language; Cleopatra was a charismatic woman, who directed her efforts toward protecting and enriching her family and subjects. Her efforts to enhance her realm collided with her family and romantic life, leaving a legacy for scholars, poets and artists down to the present day. The course will examine the Hellenistic period and the beginning of the Roman domination of the Mediterranean world, as focused in the character and historical career of Cleopatra, the last of the Ptolemaic rulers of Egypt. We will read the ancient sources on Cleopatra, the Ptolemies, Caesar and Marc Antony, the Battle of Actium and its aftermath, the consolidation of power by Octavian/Augustus. We will also analyze the evidence of ancient art and architecture, inscriptions, and archaeological contexts, including the background of Egyptian culture, the phenomenon of Alexander and the creation of the Hellenistic kingdoms. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 306 Ancient Medicine (3 credits)

After a brief look at medicine in Egypt and the ancient Near East, this course will examine medicine in the Greek and Roman world. We will read and analyze ancient medical texts, principally from the Hippocratic Corpus and the writings of Galen, and literary and philosophical texts contemporary with them. We will attempt to understand the cultural contexts of ancient medicine, the thought and practices of ancient physicians, and the relationship between Greco-Roman medicine and modern traditions that derive from it. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 307 Ancient Greece & Rome in Film (3 credits)

This course examines various films set in the classical world or inspired by classical themes. It focuses on the relation of these films to ancient literary sources and traces the reasons for the commercial success of the genre in the 1950's and early 1960's, and its rebirth at the dawn of the twenty-first century. The course investigates the uses and abuses of classical antiquity, such as how faithfully it is portrayed on the big screen and how modern concerns (about e.g., politics, ethnicity, morality, religion, gender, sexuality, and cinema itself) are dressed into an ancient costume. Students will read secondary literature as well as a variety of ancient sources in English translation. Students will be required to watch the films prior to class meetings, since only a few, representative scenes will be shown in class; these scenes will form part of the in-class discussion. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP. Also satisfies GEP Writing Intensive.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 320 Golden Age of Rome (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary approach to the most interesting and important period of Roman history: the beginning of the Principate under Emperor Augustus. This course will include a thorough study of the history, major literature and art/architecture of the period. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 321 Anc World Sexuality & Gender (3 credits)

A study of the ancient Greek and Roman cultural constructions of gender through reading of legal, philosophical, medical, historical, religious, and literary works. We will examine the connections between the ancient ideology of gender and the legal, social, religious, and economic roles of women in Greek and Roman cultures. We will also compare this ancient ideology of gender with conceptions of masculinity and femininity in modern American culture. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP. Also satisfies Gender Studies requirement and GEP Diversity requirement.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

CLA 470 Topics in Classics (3 credits)

CLA 493 Ind. Research in Classics (3 credits)

The student will study a Greek or Latin author whose works are not treated in the usual sequence of courses. Or the student may undertake a research project in the Classical field that is acceptable to the Department. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, Undergraduate

CLA 494 Ind. Research in Classics (3 credits)

The student will study a Greek or Latin author whose works are not treated in the usual sequence of courses. Or the student may undertake a research project in the Classical field that is acceptable to the Department. Fulfills the Art/Literature requirement of the GEP.

Attributes: Ancient Studies Course, Undergraduate