Psychology

Department Overview

Psychology is the scientific study of human and animal behavior, in all of its many manifestations. The Department of Psychology of Saint Joseph’s offers students an exciting and challenging curriculum. The broad range of courses provides opportunities for understanding Psychology as a scientific, clinical, and corporate discipline. The Department’s focus is on relevant, current research and the application of that research in experimental, clinical, counseling, health care and corporate settings. The full spectrum of activities and concerns of psychologists are covered, with consideration given to ethical issues.

University students with a wide range of interests find Psychology personally appealing and professionally relevant. Students use the Psychology major as a gateway to a diverse range of employment opportunities, including the health and legal professions, human resources and management positions, education and school counseling, and other social, industrial and organizational situations. Students wishing to pursue careers in the mental health professions can take advantage of our clinical concentration of courses. For those students interested in pursuing graduate study in Psychology, the Department offers a five-year Bachelor’s/Master’s degree program that offers training in the areas of behavioral neuroscience, clinical psychology and neuropsychology, behavioral pediatrics, social psychology, cognitive psychology, and developmental psychology.

Our graduates are currently college professors, researchers, school psychologists, clinical psychologists, counselors, developmental psychologists, personnel managers, educators, learning disability specialists, social workers, physicians, attorneys, and successful businessmen and women.

For more information about our program, please visit our web pages at http://psychology.sju.edu.

Departmental Mission

Few abilities are more central to a person’s successful and productive functioning in modern society than the sophisticated, insightful appreciation of one’s own behavior and the behavior of others. The University’s goal of developing liberally educated students in the 21st century and the Ignatian ideal of being ‘men and women for and with others’ can be advanced by encouraging students to develop sophisticated insight into behavior, both their own and that of others, in all of its diverse manifestations. The study of Psychology provides a theoretical and scientific framework that fosters the development of this sophisticated appreciation of oneself and others.

In the spirit of the Jesuit, Catholic, liberal arts tradition, the Department of Psychology of Saint Joseph’s University provides students with an understanding and appreciation of behavior and mental processes in all of its diverse manifestations, for the betterment of the human condition.

The Department promotes excellence through the teacher/scholar model and provides an atmosphere for students to be intellectually curious, socially responsible, to reason well, and to become independent learners. This academic experience will change the way they conceive of their world and themselves and will promote a life-long commitment to social justice and learning.

The Department serves its academic discipline and the larger community through faculty scholarship and the preparation of future scholars, as well as providing students with the intellectual, interpersonal, and communication skills that promote success in a variety of career paths.

Guided by the philosophy of science as a worldview and its application to psychological processes, the Department of Psychology supports the University’s mission by:

  • Excelling in teaching, scholarship, and service.
  • Making a vital contribution to the general education of the University’s students.
  • Modeling cura personalis through advising, mentoring, community and professional service, and assuming positions of leadership within and outside the University.
  • Preparing courses that reflect the historic roots of the discipline as well as contemporary thought, and making explicit the connections between basic science and real world applications.
  • Emphasizing professional ethics of psychology as a discipline.
  • Conducting and disseminating high quality research, in partnership with students.
  • Providing students with experientially based learning.
  • Preparing students to contribute to the common good.

Professor: Donald S. Leitner, Ph.D.; Jodi A. Mindell, Ph.D.; Philip Schatz, Ph.D.
Associate: Josephine Shih, Ph.D.; Matthew J. Anderson, Ph.D.; Patrick Garrigan, Ph.D.; Phyllis Anastasio, Ph.D.
Assistant: Alex Skolnick, Ph.D.; Clare Conry-Murray, Ph.D.; Elizabeth A. Becker, Ph.D.

Chair: Leitner

Undergraduate Major

Undergraduate Minors

Graduate Degree

Adult Undergraduate Degree

PSY N001 Non-Credit Time Mgmt & Stress (1 credit)

PSY N002 Non-Credit Leadership (1 credit)

PSY N003 Non-Credit - Team Development (1 credit)

PSY N004 Non-Credit Stress Management (1 credit)

PSY N005 Non-Credit Time Management (1 credit)

PSY 100 Introductory Psychology (3 credits)

This course introduces the student to the research problems, methods, findings, and basic theory that constitute the scientific investigation of human and animal behavior.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

PSY 101 Intro Psychology Seminar (3 credits)

PSY 120 Lifespan Development (3 credits)

This course looks at the changes that take place in our lives: in our bodies, our personalities, our ways of thinking, our feelings, our behavior, our relationships, and the roles we play during different periods of our lives. In this course we seek to describe these changes through the scientific research that has observed, measured, recorded and interpreted objective data on growth and development. Additionally we will seek to explain these changes in so far as possible, attempting answers to why they have occurred and what influential roles heredity and environment play. Does not count toward Psychology major or minor. NOTE: This course does not count toward the Psychology major. This course is not open to students who have already completed PSY 231. This course is only open to students who are not and do not plan to be Psychology majors. Psychology majors should take PSY 231 instead.

Restrictions: Students cannot enroll who have a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 121 Child Development (3 credits)

An attempt will be made to understand the development of children as it occurs in biological, psychosocial, and cultural contexts. Emphasis will be given to contemporary psychological research on children and its implications for the understanding of the everyday behavior of the child. Notes: This course is only open to students who are not and do not plan to be Psychology majors. This course is not open to students who have taken PSY 231.

Restrictions: Students cannot enroll who have a major in Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 122 Abnormal Psychology/Non-Majors (3 credits)

How do we define what behaviors are abnormal? This course will provide an overview to the study of psychopathology, more commonly known as abnormal psychology. As an introductory course to abnormal psychology, it will focus primarily on the description of various psychological disorders, their clinical course, and the current understanding of the causes of these disorders. Notes: This course does not count towards the Psychology degree. This course is not open to students who have already completed PSY 232 . This course is only open to students who are not and do not plan to be Psychology majors. Psychology majors should instead take PSY 232.

Restrictions: Students cannot enroll who have a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 123 Psychology of Men and Women (3 credits)

Stop being part of the problem and try becoming part of the solution!! Find out what the battle between the sexes, sometimes referred to as "The Longest War," is really about. Explore the nature of the psychological experiences unique to growing up male and female in contemporary society and its effects on behavior and relationships. Current non-technical readings drawn from diverse disciplines (Biology, Sociology, History, as well as Psychology) will serve as the basis of classroom discussions. These will be supplemented by lectures summarizing the latest psychological research on gender similarities and differences. Note: This course does not count toward Psychology major.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

PSY 124 Human Sexuality (3 credits)

The human sexual experience will be examined openly and objectively from physical, social, and psychological perspectives. Issues of current concern such as pornography, homosexuality, and sexuality and the handicapped will be explored in depth. Lectures and discussions may be supplemented by audio-visual materials and guest speakers.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

PSY 125 Forensic Psychology (3 credits)

This course will provide a broad overview of the field of forensic psychology and the numerous ways that the discipline of psychology may be applied to the practice of the law. Forensic psychology focuses on the application of psychological research, methods, and expertise to issues that come before the legal system. The mental disorders that are encountered in forensic evaluations will be considered, along with the manner in which forensic psychologists assist judges and juries in determining criminal responsibility and punishment. Students will learn about the psychological underpinnings of crime; issues around competency to stand trial; issues around the insanity defense, capital murder and the death penalty; issues around child custody matters; jury selection; and interrogation procedures. Note: This course does not count toward Psychology major or minor.

PSY 126 Psychology of Culture (3 credits)

How does culture affect human behavior? The aim of this course is to use psychological theory and research to examine culture's effects on people cross-culturally. This course will examine how people are influenced by their culture and how people consider culture in the way they think about and treat others. This course will also focus on facets of cultures, including gender, race, ethnicity, and poverty. In addition, the course will examine how interactions among these facets influence people across-cultures.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 150 Gender Matters (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of research and theories on the biological, psychological, and the social aspects of gender. Areas of similarities as well as differences between men and women will be discussed. Significant attention will be given to the impact gender has on the everyday lives of women and men in contemporary American society today. Does not count toward Psychology major or minor.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

PSY 152 Psy of Violence & Aggression (3 credits)

PSY 196 Psychology AP Course Credit (3 credits)

PSY 200 Personality Psychology (3 credits)

What are the forces that make us who we are, and uniquely different from all others? Is it our unique genetic make-up, our familial environment, our neighborhoods and peers, our culture? This course examines and strives to integrate human personality from several levels of analysis: trait level, biological level, motivational level, environmental level including microenvironments (family) as well as macro environments (neighborhoods, culture), and cognitive level. Important psychological questions are built into this analysis, including the nature/nurture debate, conscious/unconscious processes, and free-will/determinism.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 201 Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)

This is an introductory-level course exploring the relationship between human behavior and the functioning of the brain. Topics to be covered include research techniques in neuroscience, the structure and function of the peripheral and central nervous systems, the structure and function of nerve cells, the chemistry of the nervous system, and drug effects in the nervous system.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 205 Neuroscience Foundation (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the diverse disciplines of the neurosciences, with an emphasis on methodologies and historical research and perspectives. Students will obtain an understanding of the anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, with a specific focus on electrical and chemical cellular transmission, and the pharmacology of synaptic transmission. Note: This course is an elective that can also be used to satisfy the requirements of the Behavioral Neuroscience minor.

Prerequisites: (PSY 201 or BIO 101) and (PSY 101 or PSY 100)

PSY 206 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 credits)

In this advanced course, students will explore the neural and hormonal regulation of social behavior. Topics to be covered will include: sleep and other biological rhythms, neurological and psychiatric disorders, emotion, learning and memory, behavioral endocrinology, ingestive behavior, and reproductive behavior. Note: This course is an elective that can also be used to satisfy the requirements of the Behavioral Neuroscience minor.

Prerequisites: (PSY 101 or PSY 100) and (PSY 201 or BIO 101) and (PSY 205 or BIO 412)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a minor in Behavioral Neuroscience.

PSY 207 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the emerging interdisciplinary field of cognitive neuroscience. Students will learn methodological and investigative techniques and strategies used in research in cognitive neuroscience. Students will be also exposed to current research in psychophysiology and neuroradiology that further understanding of behaviors such as attention, perception, learning and memory, language, reasoning, and consciousness. Note: This course is an elective that can also be used to satisfy the requirements of the Behavioral Neuroscience minor

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 and PSY 361

PSY 208 Human/Animal Relations (3 credits)

Non-human animals play an integral part in lives of humans. This course will explore the important relationship between human and non-human animals. Topics to be covered include: the history of animal domestication, and the influence of animals on human culture and religion. Moreover, the ethical implications of human interactions with animals in the laboratory, in captivity, as livestock, and in the wild will be considered. Note: This course is an elective that can also be used to satisfy the requirements of the Animal Studies minor.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

PSY 210 Research Methods (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the techniques and methods of descriptive and inferential research as they are applied to psychological science. Topics include archival research, naturalistic observation, participant-observer research, clinical-case studies, correlational research, quasi-experimental designs, between- and within-subject experimental designs, and factorial-design research. Particular emphasis on ethical issues in psychological research is given.

Prerequisites: PSY 101 or PSY 100

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

PSY 211 Stats for the Social Sciences (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of statistical analyses, descriptive and inferential, that are used in the social sciences. Topics include measures of central tendency, variability, correlational analyses, regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and selected parametric and non-parametric tests. Laboratory work will include the use of computer-based statistical packages to aid in analysis and interpretation of discipline- appropriate research data.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 212 Multicultural Psychology (3 credits)

We live in a multicultural society that requires an appropriate understanding of cultural diversity. This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the effects of culture on human thinking and behavior. The course considers current theories and research on culture, gender, race and ethnicity with the goal of better understanding the ways in which the multicultural context influences psychological processes. The aim of the course is to achieve a better appreciation of cultural groups and consideration of cultural issues in interpreting social experiences.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

PSY 220 Sensation and Perception (3 credits)

The world around us abounds with all manner of sensory stimuli-visual, olfactory, auditory, tactile, and gustatory. This course will explore the manner in which we internalize this information and use it as knowledge about what is going on around us. Each of the senses will be considered from biological and phenomenological perspectives, and the process by which we derive meaning from sensory activity will be examined. Topics to be covered include object perception, visual attention, music and speech perception, somatosensory processing, taste preferences, and smell recognition.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 221 Animal Learning and Memory (3 credits)

Other than that which is genetically coded, everything we know is derived from and reflects memory for information that we have learned in the past. This course introduces the student to the scientific investigation of the basic processes of learning and memory. Topics of discussion will include the traditional theories, methodologies, and empirical findings of habituation and sensitization, classical conditioning, and instrumental conditioning. In addition, mechanisms of retention, sources of forgetting, and the biological basis of learning and memory processes will be considered.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Animal Studies, Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 221L Animal Learn & Memory Lab (1 credit)

This laboratory course is a co-requisite for PSY 221, Animal Learning and Memory. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101, and PSY 200, PSY 201, PSY 210, and PSY 211. Co-requisite: PSY 221.

Prerequisites: (PSY 100 or PSY 101) and PSY 201 and PSY 210 and PSY 211

PSY 222 Neuropsychology (3 credits)

Neuropsychology will introduce students to understanding human brain/behavior relationships. Emphasis will be placed on commonly used approaches in assessing and measuring human behavior and how the human brain is responsible for cognition, language, memory, spatial processing, emotion, and personality. Students will gain an understanding of principles of brain organization, individual differences, and professional and clinical issues in neuropsychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 223 Health Psychology (3 credits)

Health psychology is a field that incorporates many sub-disciplines of psychology with modern medicine. This course seeks to provide the student with an understanding of how social, psychological, and biological variables combine to cause illness, and how behavior and environments can be changed to promote health. One important focus of the course concerns understanding the nature of stress and the impact stress has on health.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 224 Drugs, Brain &Human Behavior (3 credits)

How do drugs affect consciousness and behavior? This course will examine the action of many different drugs, both medicinal and illicit, from biological, behavioral, and social perspectives. The relationship between alterations in behavior produced by drug administration and the changes that the drug produces in the functioning of the nervous system will be emphasized. Topics to be covered include routes of drug administration, drug absorption, transport and elimination, mechanisms of drug action, the histories of miscellaneous drugs, and the behavioral and biological activity of alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, the opiates, the hallucinogens, the antipsychotics, amphetamines, and cocaine.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 225 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 credits)

This course examines the evolution and development of animal behavior. Students will gain an understanding of the behavioral diversity and commonalities among animal species. An emphasis will be placed on comparing the characteristics of human behavior with those of other species, with special attention given to the cognitive capabilities of non-human animals.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 226 Psychology of Emotion (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to major theories and topics of the psychology and biology of emotion. Areas explored include the role of the brain and peripheral physiology in emotion, how emotion is expressed, the role of cognition, cultural differences, social aspects of emotion, development of emotions, and the role of emotion in health and psychopathology.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 227 Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)

Cognitive psychology is the study of how the human mind processes information. Learning and organizing new information, remembering facts and events, recognizing objects, reading, using language, and problem solving are examples of cognitive tasks people perform every day. In this course you will learn about the mental processes underlying these tasks. Particular emphasis will be given to mental representations of information, computational models of mental processes, and applications of cognitive psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 230 Social Psychology (3 credits)

The discipline of social psychology can be described as the study of the “power of the situation.” Although we like to think that our behavior and our attitudes are freely chosen by us, this course illuminates how powerful outside situational forces can be in shaping both. It involves the understanding of how people influence, and are influenced by, others around them; how we form impressions of others and of ourselves; what determines our attraction to others (or lack thereof); why we help one another, and why we hurt one another. In addition to a basic understanding of these phenomena, an equally important goal is to develop critical and integrative ways of thinking about theories and research in social psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3 credits)

This course examines the mechanisms that contribute to psychological growth and change throughout life. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the influence of biological, cognitive, emotional, social and cultural factors on development from infancy into adulthood. Theories of development and applications to real-world problems will provide a context for understanding how humans change during the life cycle. Lectures and discussions will interweave theory, methodology and research findings about how we develop and demonstrate our abilities to perceive, think, feel, remember, plan, and ultimately realize our potential as human beings. Note: This course is not open to students who have taken PSY 121.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 232 Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview to the study of psychological disorders or abnormal behavior. Our current understanding of psychological disorders from biological, behavioral, cognitive, and psychodynamic perspectives will be presented. Attention will be given to the nature, causes, and course of various psychological disorders as well as treatment for specific disorders. Note: This course is restricted to Psychology majors. Others should instead take PSY 122, Abnormal Psychology. This course is not open to students who have already completed PSY 122. This course is a prerequisite for PSY 300 (Clinical Psychology) and PSY 301 (Psychological Assessment), both of which are required for the clinical concentration.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 233 Adulthood and Aging (3 credits)

Continuing demographic changes occurring globally as well as nationally have accelerated research in and theorizing about heretofore-neglected periods of human development. The ‘graying’ of the human population has accelerated interest in the topic of adulthood and aging at both the theoretical and empirical levels. This course will explore the adult experience using a life-span perspective and a contextual analysis including contributions from the fields of anthropology, biology, psychology, and sociology.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 234 Psychology of the Self (3 credits)

This course has been designed to provide in-depth considerations of both classic and current issues regarding the self. As a concept, the self is consistently referred to in many fields of psychology. But what is the self and how is it represented? This course will consider the self from a social psychological perspective. Special focus will be on defining the self and identifying the influences that various aspects of the self-have on our perceptions, emotions, and behavior.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 235 Psychology of Gender (3 credits)

This course will examine a wide variety of psychological issues concerning gender. Topics will include gender bias in research, theories of gender, gender typing, cultural emphases on gender differences, gender and the self-concept, and psychological phenomena unique to women’s and men’s experiences.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 236 Ethics in Psychology (3 credits)

Ethics and professional issues in clinical psychology will be addressed in this course. The focus will be on ethical principles as applied to psychological assessment and diagnosis, psychotherapy and clinical judgment, clinical research, and client-patient and student-teacher relationships. Case studies will be used to illustrate ethical and professional issues, as well as examples from clinical practice and modern media.

Prerequisites: (PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196) and PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

PSY 237 Abnormal Child Psychology (3 credits)

This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to abnormal child psychology. Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of children and adolescents will be discussed. Specific disorders covered will include attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders of childhood, affective (mood) disorders, conduct disorder and other disruptive behavior disorders, learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and sleep disorders.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 or PSY 196

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 238 Social Development (3 credits)

Social development involves the ways that children grow and interact with others, including parents, peers, siblings and authority figures. This course will cover social development from infancy through adolescence. The course will cover the major theories of social development, as well as issues such as parenting styles, gender development, moral development, aggression and motivation.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 239 Psychology of Media (3 credits)

Every one of us is exposed to, and thus influenced by, some aspect of the media. This course will examine some of the major aspects of the media, including 1) media content, with emphasis upon depictions of gender, age, race, sexuality, violence, advertising, and news, 2) effects of exposure to that content, and 3) who owns and thus controls the content of what we see, hear, and play. As a laboratory course, students will also engage in the full research process, from reviewing the scholarly work of others, formulating an original research hypothesis, testing that hypothesis, and drawing logical conclusions from the data.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

PSY 300 Clinical Psychology (3 credits)

This is an advanced course that provides an overview of the field of clinical psychology. Students are expected to have taken Abnormal Psychology and are familiar with the various psychological disorders covered in that course. The primary goals of the Clinical Psychology course are to familiarize students with the history of clinical psychology as a field, including the roles in which clinical psychologists serve and settings in which they work, as well as current issues and debates in the field; provide a foundation in student’s understanding of the various theoretical orientations that guide how clinical psychologists approach their work; orient the student to the various types of assessments that are employed to aid in the treatment conceptualization; and help students clarify their own interests and approaches in the mental health field and mapping them to the client populations and presenting problems of interests and the appropriate graduate programs to suit their goals.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101 and PSY 232

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 301 Psychological Assessment (3 credits)

This course covers the theory, construction, use, and interpretation of the wide range of available psychological, neuropsychological, and educational tests. Tests of intellectual ability, academic achievement, industrial aptitude, and personality and clinical variables will be reviewed. Specific emphasis will be placed on reliability, validity, ethics, the utility of test measures, test administration, and interpretation and communication of test results.

Prerequisites: PSY 232

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 340L Behavioral Neuroscience Lab (1 credit)

In this lab, students will learn neuroscience research techniques and conduct a self-designed, semester-long research project exploring the consequences of brain lesion on behavior. Students are expected to learn aseptic surgical techniques and will conduct survival brain surgery on their research animal. Brains will be collected at the end of the semester for further analysis. Students gain valuable neuroscience experience, through this authentic laboratory course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a minor in Behavioral Neuroscience.

PSY 350 Experimental Psych Laboratory (3 credits)

This course will focus on the use of research design and statistical methodology as tools for answering research questions in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will learn to apply research design and statistical methodology in the development of research questions, the gathering of data, and the analysis and reporting of results. Students will gain a more applied and complete understanding of the research process, which will allow them to critically analyze published research and/or be able to conduct independent research. This course will also prepare students for more advanced Psychology coursework

Prerequisites: PSY 210 and PSY 211

PSY 370 Adv Topics in Psych:Nat Sci I (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the natural sciences each semester that it is scheduled. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101.

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 371 Adv Topics in Psych:Nat Sci II (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the natural sciences each semester that it is scheduled. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 372 Adv Topics in Psych:Soc Sci I (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the social sciences each semester that it is scheduled. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 373 Adv Topics in Psych:Soc Sci II (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the social sciences each semester that it is scheduled. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 374 Independent Study I (3 credits)

The content of the Independent Study is negotiated between student and faculty mentor. The content cannot be that of an existing course in the curriculum unless that course will not be offered during the time that the student completes his or her program of study. Restricted to junior and senior Psychology majors and minors. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: PSY 210

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 375 Independent Study II (3 credits)

The content of the Independent Study is negotiated between student and faculty mentor. The content cannot be that of an existing course in the curriculum unless that course will not be offered during the time that the student completes his or her program of study. Restricted to junior and senior Psychology majors and minors. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: PSY 210

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 390 Internship I (3 credits)

Internship entails spending eight hours each week (for a total of 112 hours) at a site in which students’ work will be supervised and evaluated. Settings include clinical, clinical research, counseling, hospital, educational research, special education, correctional, and industrial facilities. Restricted to junior and senior Psychology majors and minors. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: PSY 210

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior. Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 391 Internship II (3 credits)

Internship entails spending eight hours each week (for a total of 112 hours) at a site in which students’ work will be supervised and evaluated. Settings include clinical, clinical research, counseling, hospital, educational research, special education, correctional, and industrial facilities. Restricted to junior and senior Psychology majors and minors. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: PSY 210

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior. Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 392 Independent Research I (3 credits)

Students are responsible for designing and conducting an original research project under the direction of a faculty mentor. Restricted to junior and senior Psychology majors and minors.. Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: PSY 210

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 393 Independent Research II (3 credits)

Students are responsible for designing and conducting an original research project under the direction of a faculty mentor. Restricted to junior and senior Psychology majors and minors. . Permission of instructor required.

Prerequisites: PSY 210

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 491 Rsrch Sem: Nat Sci, Psych I (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the natural sciences each semester that it is scheduled. The semester’s topic will be treated in depth in a seminar format. Students will become familiar with research and theory in the area under study using primary source material. Students may also become involved in research projects in the area under study.

Prerequisites: PSY 210 and PSY 211 and (PSY 221L or PSY 238L or PSY 227L or PSY 350)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 492 Research Sem:Nat Sci, Psych II (3 credits)

PSY 493 Research Sem: Soc Sci, Psych I (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the social sciences each semester that it is scheduled. The semester’s topic will be treated in depth in a seminar format. Students will become familiar with research and theory in the area under study using primary source material. Students may also become involved in research projects in the area under study.

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and PSY 201 and PSY 210 and PSY 211 and (PSY 221L or PSY 227L)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 494 Research Sem:Soc Sci, Psych II (3 credits)

This course will focus on a different topic in psychology from the perspective of the social sciences each semester that it is scheduled. The semester’s topic will be treated in depth in a seminar format. Students will become familiar with research and theory in the area under study using primary source material. Students may also become involved in research projects in the area under study.

Prerequisites: PSY 320L or PSY 321L

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

PSY 551 Adv Research Methods & Stats I (4 credits)

This course will provide both a conceptual and practical understanding of advanced research methods and statistical methods for psychological data. Topics on research method will include: within- and between-subject experimental research, scale development, and validity/reliability. Topics on descriptive and inferential statistical procedures will include: analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlations, multiple regressions, power, and effect size. Students will learn to apply these statistical methods to the test of mediation and moderation models. Practical understanding of these techniques will be achieved through hands-on analysis of research questions using computerized statistical packages such as SPSS.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment limited to students in the MSPSYC program. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 552 Adv Research Methods& Stats II (4 credits)

This course will address statistical procedures appropriate for the analysis of multivariate psychological data. Topics include simple and canonical correlation, linear and multiple regression techniques, discriminant analysis, analysis of covariance, multivariate analysis of variance, and factor analysis. Practical understanding of these techniques will be achieved through hands-on analysis of research questions using large sample data bases and computerized statistical packages such as SPSS.

Prerequisites: PSY 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 591 Directed Studies I (4 credits)

Research conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate psychology program faculty leading to the development of a proposal for a Master’s thesis.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment limited to students in the MSPSYC program.

PSY 592 Directed Studies II (4 credits)

Research conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate psychology program faculty leading to the development of a Master’s thesis.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 610 Learning and Behavior (4 credits)

Presentation of major concepts and findings from research on basic learning processes and exploration of their implications for complex behavior. Basic processes include classical and operant conditioning, stimulus control, reinforcement, and aversive control. Complex behaviors include attention, memory, and dysfunctional behavior. The physiological basis of learning will also be explored.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 611 Adv Physiological Psychology (4 credits)

An examination of the biological foundations of human and animal behavior. The relationship between behavior and the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system will be emphasized, ranging from the cellular level to a consideration of whole neural systems whose activity supports behavior. Behaviors to be studied will extend from simple reflex arcs to the regulation of motivational states.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 612 Adv Sensory Processes (4 credits)

The manner in which different forms of stimulus energy in the environment are internalized by the organism will be considered in detail in this course. Visual, olfactory, gustatory, auditory, and tactile systems will be examined from biological and phenomenological perspectives. Also to be considered are theoretical issues such as how meaning and knowledge are derived from sensory stimulation.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 613 Psychopharmacology (4 credits)

An exploration of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs. The manner in which drugs enter, distribute themselves throughout, and exit the body will be considered. The relationship between alterations in behavior produced by drug administration and the changes that the drug produces in the functioning of the nervous system will be emphasized. Topics to be covered include routes of drug administration, drug absorption, transport, and elimination, mechanisms of action, the histories of miscellaneous drugs, and the behavioral and biological activity of alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, the opiates, the hallucinogens, the antipsychotics, amphetamine, and cocaine.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 614 Cognitive Science (4 credits)

This course explores topics within the fields of cognitive psychology, cognitive science, and cognitive neuroscience. The course focuses on how humans make sense of our experiences. In particular, we will learn about how the human brain extracts information from the environment and how that information gets processed, represented, stored, and retrieved. Particular attention will be paid to the following topics: perception, attention, memory, imagery, intelligence, problem solving, creativity, robotics, and artificial intelligence.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 615 Health Psychology (4 credits)

The course in health psychology will provide students with a basic understanding of the involvement of psychology in the fields of medicine and health care. A general overview of psychological and physiological factors that influence disease and disorders, prevention strategies, and psychologically based interventions will be presented. In addition, topics such as stress and disease, coping with illness and pain, compliance, and positive health behavior will be discussed. The theoretical emphasis of the course will be on a bio psychosocial perspective.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment limited to students in the MSPSYC program. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 616 Principles of Neuropsychology (4 credits)

Principles of Neuropsychology will introduce students to the current state of the field and to recognized and commonly used approaches in the clinical understanding of human brain-behavior relationships. Emphasis will be placed on how the neurological substrate of the human brain governs and influences cognition; biological bases of language, memory, spatial processing, and emotion; principles of brain organization, localization of function and individual differences; and professional and clinical issues.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 617 Memory Organization& Retrieval (4 credits)

This course examines a variety of issues in memory theory and research. Topics include models of memory, the effects of development and aging on memory, the relation between encoding and retrieval contexts, various sources of forgetting, amnesias, and the neurobiology of memory.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 618 Comparative Psychology (4 credits)

Comparative psychology examines the evolution and development of animal behavior. In this course, students explore the similarities and differences in the behavior and mental processes among species, with special emphasis placed on comparing the characteristics of human behavior with those of other animals.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 620 Hormones, Brain and Behavior (4 credits)

This course provides a survey of research on the relationship between the brain, hormones and social behavior (behavioral neuroendocrinology) in a wide range of species. Topics may include, but are not limited to, reproductive behavior, parental behavior, aggression, stress, sex-differences, learning and memory.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 621 Systems Neuroscience (4 credits)

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. We will cover the neuroanatomy of the major subdivisions of the human brain, the major sensory and motor systems, and higher order functions.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 650 Gerontology (4 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide both a general introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of gerontology and a specific focus on those aspects of aging that have been of particular interest to biologists and psychologists. Additionally, attention will be given to the effects aging changes have on the functioning and well-being of older adults.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 651 Adv Psychopathology (4 credits)

This course will introduce students to the current state of knowledge in the field of psychopathology, beginning with the major theoretical approaches that contribute to our understanding of abnormal behavior. In addition, this course will integrate developmental psychopathology, social psychology, and health psychology in enhancing our understanding of the etiology and course of psychopathology. Specific emphasis will be placed on examining some of the important current research issues in psychopathology, including why major depression is more prevalent among women, the linkage between autism and childhood vaccinations, and the efficacy of community-based prevention programs.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 652 Assesment and Evaluation (4 credits)

The assessment and evaluation course will introduce students to various approaches and techniques in the assessment and evaluation of healthy individuals and clinical populations. Areas to be covered will include interviewing, behavioral observation, behavioral assessment, personality assessment, aptitude testing, cognitive assessment, neuropsychological assessment, and the reliability and validity of tests and measurements. An emphasis will be placed on the administration and interpretation of questionnaires, standardized and nontraditional tests and test batteries using real-life examples.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 653 Behavioral Medicine (4 credits)

The purpose of the course in behavioral medicine will be to apply theories, techniques, and principles learned in health psychology to clinical populations. Coverage will include selected medical and psychophysiological diseases and syndromes (e.g., cardiovascular, stress disorders, chronic illnesses), psychological sequelae, and specific intervention strategies.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 654 Developmental Psychology (4 credits)

This course reviews major theoretical perspectives and contemporary research in the field of developmental psychology. The course will examine how development in various domains (e.g. emotional, social, and cognitive) is influenced by the contexts in which development takes place (e.g. family, school, neighborhood, socioeconomic context, culture) as well as the child’s active construal of the world. Particular attention will be paid to development from birth through adolescence.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students in the MSPSYC program. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 655 Personality and Motivation (4 credits)

PSY 656 Social Cognition (4 credits)

Social cognition is the study of the ways in which we process social information—both accurately and inaccurately—and how that information processing determines our perceptions of, and behavior within, a complex social world. Many times we are unaware of just what had influenced us, and this course will illuminate some of those external influences. Automatic and controlled processing of information, social schemas, mental short-cuts to decision-making, attitude formation and change, social stereotypes, the development of our self- concept, and person perception are a few of the many topics covered.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 659 Adv. Child Psychopathology (4 credits)

This course explores the empirical literature on the diagnosis, etiology, course, and treatment of various psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence. Students will become familiar with the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria and their application to children, symptom presentation in children, and issues of differential diagnosis. We will consider how a developmental psychopathology perspective and bio psychosocial factors influence diagnosis, treatment and research of child psychopathology. Empirically supported treatments for childhood disorders will be examined. Students will become familiar with the research methodologies used to develop and evaluate treatments with the goal of becoming wise consumers of treatment research.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 660 Ethics in Psychology (4 credits)

This course will cover ethical and legal issues related to professional conduct in the practice of psychology, including topics such as ethical reasoning, the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, incorporating state regulations and rules of conduct, complaint resolution procedures, confidentiality, release of information, record keeping, informed consent, and the duty to warn. The course addresses ethical issues across specialties, from clinical to experimental psychology.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 661 Cross-Cultural Psychology (4 credits)

This course will provide students with an overview of theories and research related to cross-cultural psychology. Students will learn how culture is defined and studied. They will learn about the major differences and similarities that have been found among cultures. In addition, they will learn to read and critique psychological literature that deals with culture.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 662 The Nature of Emotion (4 credits)

This course will introduce students to the fastest-growing area of psychology, the science of emotion. The course will focus on the fundamental aspects of emotions, such as: What are emotions? What are the different theories put forth to understand emotions? How do emotions work? How are they instantiated in the nervous system? Additional topics include the interaction between emotion and cognition, the social nature of emotion, and the developmental process that shape emotion.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.

PSY 664 Psychology and the Law (4 credits)

This course explores the relationship between psychology and the law. Psychology studies the brain and human behavior; the law regulates human behavior and evaluates the mind. In a seminar format, we will discuss theories and research regarding social, developmental, clinical, and forensic psychology as they relate to the law, the legal system and public policy. Topics may include criminal justice, death penalty jurisprudence, mass incarceration, juries, legal decision making, expert testimony, eye witness testimony, mental capacity and competency, plea bargaining, and juveniles in the legal system.

PSY 691 Master's Research I (4 credits)

Research conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate psychology program faculty leading to the completion of a proposal for a Master’s thesis.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PSY 692 Master's Research II (4 credits)

Research conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate psychology program faculty leading to the completion of a Master’s thesis.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Psychology Five Year or Psychology.