Public Policy

The Public Policy major includes interdisciplinary coursework that concentrates on the theory, analysis and application of policy in order to prepare students with the requisite skills and knowledge to pursue careers in the public or private sector or graduate work in public policy and related disciplines.  Public Policy students will not only investigate policy in and of itself, but also the relationships among all of the actors and entities that have a voice in the policymaking process.  This process is inherently interdisciplinary, and thus brings together scholarship from Economics, Political Science, and Sociology to understand and analyze public policy, including the process itself and the impact of policy on individuals, businesses, and society.  The Public Policy major offers a “rigorous, student-centered education rooted in the liberal arts” that encourages students to investigate social problems, explore ethical standards and considerations, and examine issues of equity across a variety of contexts. The goal is to “prepare students for personal excellence, professional success and engaged citizenship” by equipping them with the skills that are necessary for understanding the broad, societal impact of public policy.

Undergraduate Major

Public Policy

Undergraduate Minors

Public Policy

Graduate Degree

Saint Joseph University's combined B.A./M.S. program in Public Policy offers students an exciting and challenging curriculum of study. The program allows students to engage in an in-depth study of Public Policy, while providing opportunities for research with nationally renowned faculty in Economics, Political Science, and Sociology. This unique program is designed for successful completion over five academic years.

The MS degree will require students to major in economics, international relations, sociology, criminal justice, OR political science, AND minor in public policy; OR major in public policy.  Those who apply will be evaluated for acceptance into the program following the completion of the first semester of the junior year. These undergraduate applicants will be asked to submit a complete undergraduate transcript, two letters of recommendation/reference, and an essay describing their interests and goals of graduate education in public policy. Minimum GPA requirement is 3.00. Once accepted, they will need to complete Statistics for Social Sciences or similar course (MAT 118), if not already completed.

ECN 101 Introductory Economics Micro (3 credits)

By analyzing the behavior of buyers and sellers in product and factor markets, this course explains how a market economy determines how scarce resources are allocated to the production and distribution of various goods and services. Supply-and-demand models are used to explain the determination of the prices of products and of factor inputs, and the consequences of government controls and of different types of market structures on prices, wages, and economic efficiency are analyzed.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

ECN 102 Introductory Economics Macro (3 credits)

Theoretical models of the economy as a whole, show what determines the level of national output, employment, and prices, and how these might be stabilized by the proper fiscal and monetary policies. The course also looks at the mechanism by which our money supply changes, and considers the benefits and problems associated with international trade. Topics covered include the measurement of GDP, inflation and unemployment; Keynesian and Classical theories of output and price determination; the Federal Reserve System; the federal budget and the national debt; and the balance of payments.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

ECN 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

In 1992, James Carville, then candidate Bill Clinton’s campaign manager, coined the phrase “the economy, stupid.” The implication was that the economy was the number one issue for voters. A November 2019 poll confirms this-- ..”when asked what issue 'matters the most to you right now,' jobs and the economy is cited by 24% of Americans, No. 1 among all responses...” This course discusses the major economic policy issues of the 2020 presidential election, including health care, immigration, climate change, federal budget and taxation, trade and tariffs, minimum wage, and SNAP. The two major parties’ policy platforms will be the primary texts, which are supplemented by readings from the economics literature, campaign policy briefs and articles from the media. This course will also study some topics in the economics of voting, including ranked choice voting and whether it is rational to vote at all.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

ECN 170 Special Topics in Economics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 270 Special Topics in Economics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 301 Microeconomic Theory (3 credits)

This course presents an analysis of the behavior of households as buyers of output and suppliers of inputs, an analysis of firms as suppliers of output and buyers of inputs, and a study of their interaction in markets that determines the prices and quantities of outputs and inputs. Applications of analytical tools are demonstrated.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 302 Macroeconomic Theory (3 credits)

This course examines a complete model of the economy to show the forces that determine the rate of unemployment, the rate of inflation, the rate of growth, and the international financial position of an economy. This model is used to show the logic of, and the limitations of, monetary, fiscal, and other stabilization policies.

Prerequisites: ECN 102

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 321 International Trade (3 credits)

This course investigates a primary component in the study of international economics: the causes and effects of international trade and barriers to trade. The class begins with an overview of world trade patterns and then focuses on classical and modern trade theory, exploring the Ricardian and Heckscher-Ohlin models, as well as non-comparative advantage based models that incorporate economies of scale and monopolistic competition. The second part of the class focuses on trade policy, starting with a theoretical analysis of tariffs, and then investigating the debate over free trade as it pertains to both developing and advanced economies. The class also looks at the economic institutions involved in the management of global trade, such as the World Trade Organization.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 or ECN 102

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Economics, International Business, International Relations or Latin American Studies.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

ECN 322 International Macroeconomics (3 credits)

This course investigates international macroeconomic theory and its application to current events and policy issues, including the study of the principles and practices of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and international money markets for achieving both domestic and international policy objectives. Coverage includes the description and history of financial crises, currency policy, the development of international financial markets and the relevant national and international institutions. ECN 101 is recommended. Note: counts towards the quantitative track.

Prerequisites: ECN 102

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

ECN 330 Economics of Labor (3 credits)

This course concentrates on the analysis of the major contemporary issues concerning labor relations and labor unions; in particular: unemployment, wage-price relations, the settlement of disputes, minimum-wage legislation, wage differentials and discrimination, and competition from imports. Discussion is not confined to the purely economic dimensions of these topics. The course includes descriptive material on the development and present structure of the labor union movement in this country and on the more interesting and significant features of labor-management relations in selected foreign countries. Note: Can count towards quantitative track with the completion of additional coursework and permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 340 Government Finance (3 credits)

This course examines the nature of government spending, the decision-making process, and trends. It describes and evaluates several kinds of taxation and proposals for reform. It utilizes microeconomics to investigate tax incidence and the welfare effects of taxation.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 350 Monetary Economics (3 credits)

The course analyzes the nature and functions of money to show its influence on GNP, the price level, unemployment, and the allocation of resources. Commercial banking and other financial institutions will be studied, as well as central banking. Note: counts towards the quantitative track.

Prerequisites: ECN 102

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 360 Industrial Organization (3 credits)

Applications of microeconomic theories to public policies affecting structure and performance of markets and behavior of firms. Antitrust and other aspects of government regulation will be covered.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 365 Game Theory (3 credits)

The goal of the course is to introduce students to the field of Game Theory within the Microeconomics discipline. Standard concepts to be learned and discussed are the roles of strategy, decision making, solution concepts for games, the nature of Nash equilibria, strategic behavior, cooperation, the role of incentives, probabilities and the nature of Bayesian equilibria, auctions in theory and practice, matching theories, conflict and theories of appropriation versus production. The course will put a greater emphasis on the role of economic reasoning and the major results discovered within the field as opposed to understanding the complex mathematical proofs. In addition, students will learn to approach the study of economics from an analytic perspective as opposed to the standard quantitative approaches of undergraduate economic studies. Note: counts towards the quantitative track

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 370 Economic Development (3 credits)

This course focuses on the economic growth and development of the Third World; conditions that are conducive to growth are explored and the transformation that results from growth is studied. Also addressed is the development impact on trade, poverty, industrialization, etc.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 or ECN 102

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

ECN 375 Environmental Economics (3 credits)

Introduces the environmental concerns facing optimal allocation of resources and factors of environmental policy. Topics include environmental policy analysis, externalities, public goods, criteria for evaluating environmental policies, the role of economic analysis in environmental policy decisions, discussion of pollution control planning, economic analysis of environmental policy in The United States, and international environmental issues.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 385 Law and Economics (3 credits)

This course provides a basic understanding of the economic analysis in specific areas of common law in the United States. Covering a broad range of topics from the implications of property law and contract law for economically efficient behavior, to the effects of tort law and criminal law on the incentives for individuals to conduct themselves in a socially desirable manner. This course uses microeconomic tools to examine torts, contracts, and property law as well as the theory and empirical evidence on the economics of crime and punishment.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 390 The Economics of Healthcare (3 credits)

This course examines major policy issues associated with the delivery of health care in the United States from an economic perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the challenges and trade-offs involved in containing health care costs, maintaining quality, and ensuring access. This course will provide students with a better understanding of the major health policy issues.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 410 Econometrics (3 credits)

Basic principles of econometrics beginning with the classical linear regression model and the method of least squares. Special problems arising from the violation of classical assumptions, and statistical procedures for dealing with them, are covered. Identification and estimation problems are also studied, as well as forecasting with single-equation regression and simultaneous system of equations. Modern time-series models are evaluated, with numerous forecasting illustrations from economics and business. Note: Required for quantitative track.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 and ECN 102 and (MAT 118 or MAT 128 or DSS 210)

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 415 Economic Forecasting (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to forecasting techniques used frequently in economics and business. Students will review basic statistical concepts and then explore data patterns that are commonly found in a variety of economic settings. Central approaches to analyzing time-series data are covered, such as moving averages, smoothing methods, single and multivariate regression, Box-Jenkins (ARIMA) methodology, and others. Note: counts towards the quantitative track.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 and ECN 102 and (MAT 118 or MAT 128 or DSS 210)

ECN 420 Sports Economics (3 credits)

This course is an extension of microeconomics and encompasses three areas of economic theory - labor economics, urban economics and industrial organization. Sports, particularly professional sports, command an inordinate amount of attention and interest. By studying the economic decisions of leagues, teams and municipalities, students will see how the tools of economic theory are applied and how they impact not only the revenues and profits of the professional sports teams but the play on the field as well as the general welfare and attitude of the community.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Economics or Sports Marketing.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 450 Economics of Steel Industry (3 credits)

This course investigates various economic issues in the steel industry, including competitive conditions within the US and globally, as well as the heavy use of trade protection to prevent foreign competition and challenge foreign government subsidization. The course also focuses on the impact of environmental policy and labor unions in the steel industry, as well as the role of technology in the displacement of steel workers and an evaluation of various government policies that attempt to alleviate the economic hardship of displaced steel workers.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 and ECN 102

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 452 Econ of Presidential Elections (3 credits)

In 1992, James Carville, then candidate Bill Clinton’s campaign manager, coined the phrase “the economy, stupid.” The implication was that the economy was the number one issue for voters. A November 2019 poll confirms this-- ..”when asked what issue “matters the most to you right now,” jobs and the economy is cited by 24% of Americans, No. 1 among all responses...” In this course, we will discuss the major economic policy issues of the 2020 presidential election, including health care, immigration, climate change, federal budget and taxation, trade and tariffs, minimum wage, and SNAP. The two major parties’ policy platforms will be our primary texts. They will be supplemented by readings from the economics literature, campaign policy briefs and articles from the media. We will also study some topics in the economics of voting, including ranked choice voting and whether it is rational to vote at all.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 475 Asian Economies (3 credits)

This course will encompass a theoretical and empirical approach to the study of the economies of Asia. First, the nature of the various economies will be assessed by the observation of some indicators of economic and social development. Then, theories will be explored that attempt to explain the differences in the economies and their growth patterns. This theoretical section will entail the study of international and indigenous characteristics of Asian countries. The aim of the course is to convey to students the changes in the world distribution of economic power and in the international division of labor as it involves the Asian countries, and the implications of these trends.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 or ECN 102

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ECN 477 Chinese Economics (3 credits)

As the world becomes more integrated, countries become more interdependent. Economic events and policy changes in one country affect many other countries. The emergence of China, especially in international markets, is clearly one of the most important forces currently reshaping the world economy. Understanding China’s history, culture, economics, politics and society is imperative to help students participate in the ongoing dialogue among policymakers, economists, business firms, and international agencies. This course will cover both the historical and current aspects of the Chinese economy with a focus on the historical development of its socio-economic institutions, on its varying economic policies and strategies. In addition, this course would provide the student with opportunities to explore and apply economic theories and models to understanding the diverse processes of economic development in China.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ECN 480 Econ of Poverty & Income Dist (3 credits)

In this course, we study several facets of income distribution and inequality in the United States through the lens of economic theory. Initially, we discuss the basics of income and wealth distribution (definitions and measurements), and study the trends and patterns of income, wealth and well-being, followed by a similar discussion with respect to poverty. The second portion of the course focuses on causes and explanations of poverty and income inequality. This section relies heavily on the foundation of labor economic theory with discussion of labor force participation, unemployment and human capital. Finally, we focus on policies that may cause or alleviate poverty and income inequality – both current and proposed policy – followed with a discussion of societal goals. If time permits, we also cover labor market discrimination and wage gaps, specifically with respect to race/ethnicity. This course is an upper-division Economics elective that also meets the Faith-Justice course studies criteria.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ECN 482 Latin American Economies (3 credits)

This course tackles a variety of topics that are relevant for understanding the multiple forces that have shaped the current and historical economic development of Latin America. The analysis is conducted from multiple perspectives, including economic theory and historical accounts, but not disregarding cultural and institutional features particular to Latin America. This course also discusses and applies economic analysis to examine the opportunities, constraints and tradeoffs that the economies of Latin America and their policymakers face today in their path towards development. Microeconomic issues such as poverty, inequality, education, and health are also discussed.

Attributes: Latin American Studies Course

ECN 487 Research Methods (3 credits)

This course is an upper‐level economics elective that provides students with an introduction into research methods. We will discuss current research in applied microeconomics and apply the methods learned to create original research. Throughout the course we will investigate multiple facets of research including literature review, data analysis, and analytic writing. Throughout the course, students will be given verbal and written feedback about their analysis and writing. Throughout this course, there will be opportunities for reading about, writing about, and discussing current policies, problems, and events that are relevant to writing a comprehensive research paper. In order to gain the most from these discussions, students are required to take on an active role in these discussions.

Prerequisites: ECN 101 and ECN 410 and ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ECN 490 Seminar in Economics (3 credits)

The process of developing and executing a research project according to the standards of modern economic science is the subject of this seminar. Attention is also given to the use of the computer as a research tool.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 491 Economics Internship (3 credits)

This course combines work experience with academic study. Students work in unpaid internships for the duration of the semester (some 10 hours per week) with approved employers in the private and public sectors (or non-governmental and non-profit organizations) in the Philadelphia area. Their work experience is complemented with relevant required readings. In addition, students must keep a journal, write a final report and meet regularly with their adviser. A successful academic internship is a three-way partnership between the student, the employer, and the faculty adviser.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 493 Independent Research (3 credits)

Students will study a topic in economics with a faculty mentor. Permission of the Instructor required.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ECN 494 Independent Research (3 credits)

Taken in senior year under the direction of a thesis mentor.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 111 Intro to American Politics (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to American political processes and institutions. The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the theory and practice of American government. Students will learn about the basic structure, function, and dynamics of American government and the political system within the context of the major political issues of our time. Beyond studying the institutional structures and activities of government, we will also evaluate the relationships between individuals, groups, and institutions in terms of influence, process, and outputs in various domains.

Attributes: American Studies Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 113 Intro to Comparative Politics (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of comparative political systems, this course focuses attention on the institutions and political cultures of select countries from different world regions. While exploring the varieties of democracy and authoritarianisms, as well as the complexity of democratizing today, this course also introduces students to the comparative method.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 115 Intro to Global Politics (3 credits)

This course is an introductory survey of the major approaches (Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism), interpretations and problems in the field of Global Politics, with a heavy emphasis on current events. Topics include security (war, peace, terrorism), international political economy (hegemony, development, globalization), and trans boundary issues (migration, human rights).

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 117 Intro to Political Thought (3 credits)

When is it justified to overthrow a tyrant? Do men and women have different virtues? Are markets just? Political theorists ask questions about justice, equality, law, property, community, and duty. This course examines questions that affect today’s political world by examining the foundations of political thought - Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Adam Smith, Madison, Rousseau, Marx – as well as contemporary theorists such as Foucault, and feminist Wendy Brown.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, the First-Year Seminar courses focus on particular topics of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., Ethics in International Relations; Diversity and Inequality; Gender and Global Politics; Student Liberties and the Supreme Court). Does not count for major credit.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

POL 170 Special Topics: Political Sci (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, these courses will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., The Presidential Election, The Arab Spring, Guns and the Supreme Court). Does not count for major credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 191 Washington Leadership Seminar (3 credits)

Students who attend The Washington Center (TWC) take a leadership seminar through TWC. This course is an elective; it does not count for POL major or minor credit.

POL 192 Washington Internship (3 credits)

Students who attend The Washington Center (TWC) for a normal academic semester (fall or spring) perform a 30-35 hour a week internship. The Department grants students two upper division courses (6 credits) for the internship (see POL 411-412 below) and also this third elective course for these internship hours. This course is an elective; it does not count for POL major or minor credit.

POL 193 Washington Center Elective (3 credits)

Students who attend The Washington Center (TWC) take one evening course at the Center in addition to performing their internship and participating in the leadership seminar. If this course is in Political Science, we transfer it back as POL 193. This course is an elective; it does not count for POL major or minor credit.

POL 270 Special Topics (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, these courses will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., The Presidential Election, The Arab Spring, Guns and the Supreme Court). Students may count only two POLs 270 and/or 370 courses for major or minor credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 290 Professional Prep Seminar (0 credits)

What can you do with a degree in Political Science or International Relations? Do you know how to search for an internship or a job? And, are you ready to apply for a position should the opportunity arise? This professional development seminar will enhance students’ knowledge about internships and careers within their major and help them build practical skills through a series of steps and events throughout the semester. All majors are required to complete this seminar in the Fall semester of their Sophomore year; graded on a P/NP basis. Political Science and International Relations minors are also encouraged to register.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 301 Law and Social Change (3 credits)

Brown v. Board of Education is heralded as a great success. A disenfranchised minority turned to the courts when the legislature and executive failed to respond. To what extent has this approach been successful? Since Brown, other, groups have turned to the courts as an authority when they believe they are disadvantaged by the larger political system. Should the courts play a role in social change? What should it look like? Case studies will include: school integration in the 1960s, birth control and abortion, gun rights, capital punishment or juvenile life without parole, and marriage equality.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 303 Political Ideology in America (3 credits)

Why did Ben Franklin say that the Swedes were “blackening” the colonies? Why did Lincoln change his mind about slavery? The course examines classic texts (for example, the American Revolution, the constitutional convention, Lincoln-Douglas debates) by linking them to other important intellectual and political movements in American thought (for example, white —women’s suffrage, the 20th century civil rights movements). The course examines the changing political vocabulary in American politics – and the expansion of rights to men, laborers, women, racial minorities, and LGBT people.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 305 Politics, Ideology, & Film (3 credits)

How do ideologies -- bodies of thought -- affect individuals, social movements, nations, institutions, and groups? This course examines ideologies like fascism, communism, racism, colonialism, capitalism. We use films and primary documents from Europe, Asia, Latin America, Russia, and the United States to place each ideology in historical, political, and/or economic context. Students are expected to master the complexities of the ideologies in historical context as well as evaluate ideologies that have shaped national and international politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Classic articles in the social sciences and humanities help students explore popular responsibility for the actions of a leader (are the German people responsible for Hitler’s atrocities?), torture (is it ever ethical to torture someone for information?), and capital punishment (are there conditions when it is acceptable for the state to end a life?).

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 306 Political Participation in US (3 credits)

Why do people participate in American politics and civic life? Why don’t they? Why should they? This course emphasizes the political science literature on political participation and civic engagement. We will begin by examining the factors that make participation more or less likely including socialization, partisanship, networks, and geography. Demographic and social identities can shape how easily and how often we wish to involve ourselves in democratic processes. From there, we will focus on forms of political participation. Who votes? Who donates money? Who protests? Throughout we will acknowledge the constraints that make forms of participation easier from some than others. Finally, we will address the consequences for political life if individuals opt out of politics. What does isolation and decline in civic life mean for the rise of political and economic inequality, efficacy, and social connectedness?

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 308 American Political Institution (3 credits)

In this course, students will study some of the most important claims, findings, and readings in the field of American political institutions, policy, and politics. Paying particular attention to the key scholarly questions, debates, and research on the major institutional actors in American politics, students will study a range of topics and analyze specific institutions in American politics such as the branches of government, the bureaucracy, political parties, the media, and interest groups. Along with learning about the important theoretical and empirical questions that guide the study of American institutions, students will also examine the ways in which the public exerts influence on, and is influenced by, these institutions. The overall goal of the course is to provide insight into how the study of political institutions broadens our understanding of politics, power, and democracy.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 309 Advising the Presidency (3 credits)

What makes a president “great?” What is leadership? Why do some presidents succeed and others fail? This course offers an analysis of the contemporary American Presidency with emphasis on the use of power, the role of personality, the nature of decision-making, and the relationship with the media, interest groups, and public opinion. We will investigate how presidents decide their policy priorities; what factors affect presidents’ public standing; what conditions shape the president’s relationship with Congress; and so on. Having carefully studied the presidency from the above perspectives, we will bring our informed insights to bear on two important questions confronting current and future presidents: race and gender. While the topic of the course is the presidency in general, the secondary goal of the class is to introduce and critically analyze how race and gender shape the ideas we have about our nation’s highest office.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Faith Justice Course, Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 310 Constitutional Politics (3 credits)

From the time the Constitution was ratified, the three branches of American government (legislative, executive, and judiciary) have competed for control over American policy and law. The Supreme Court is – on the one hand – extremely powerful because it can declare an act of either the legislature or executive unconstitutional (judicial review). Yet the Court lacks any power to enforce its decisions and it relies on the other branches to enforce its decisions (for example, President Eisenhower bringing in the military to uphold the desegregation of schools). Through the reading of cases and the viewing of documentaries, this course explores how the Supreme Court has shaped American politics for over two centuries. Topics include free speech in wartime, internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, desegregation, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage.

Attributes: Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 311 Const Law:Rights & Civil Lib (3 credits)

A study of contemporary issues of civil rights and liberties in the United States through classic Supreme Court decisions. Issues addressed include freedom of speech, press, and association, racial and gender discrimination and the issue of fundamental rights, including the right of privacy. Students read cases and learn to brief cases. The course highlight is a simulation of two Supreme Court cases. Students read and research to portray justices and attorneys in the two moot court simulations.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: American Studies Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 312 Social Controv & Supreme Court (3 credits)

Americans look to the Supreme Court to rule on moral and social issues like capital punishment and abortion. Why do citizens rely on nine unelected judges to define their rights in a democracy? This class analyzes how the Supreme Court has, over time, changed American law in two controversial rights: gun ownership and marriage equality. The class begins by considering the judiciary in our constitutional democracy then turns to the two case studies. The Supreme Court decided four marriage cases in June of 2015 and the course integrates these new rulings. Students will examine documents from the Founding (e.g. the Federalist Papers), read modern accounts of both gun and marriage cases, and learn to read and brief Supreme Court decisions.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 313 Public Policy (3 credits)

This course investigates public policymaking within the United States with an emphasis on the social construction of public policy. Students will assess the significance of social, economic, and political factors that influence policymaking and implementation; how problems become a part of the political agenda; and the major political ideological perspectives in the U.S. that impact policy process and content. The course is a study of policy in practice, as students will evaluate current social problems along with empirical social science research to determine the strengths and weaknesses as well as the intended and unintended effects of a particular social policy at the state and/or national level.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Faith Justice Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 316 State and Local Government (3 credits)

This upper division course focuses on understanding variation across America’s federal system. How can we move from thinking about one American government, to 51 governments (all the states plus the national), or to the significantly larger number of local and municipal governments? What role do the states and localities play in shaping American democracy? In what ways are states hindering democracy or helping it flourish? In this course we will focus on three broad themes in the state politics literature: structural power, interest group activism, and individual political behavior. Throughout we will acknowledge that variation at the subnational level matters for engagement, equality, and the presence of a functioning democracy.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 317 Urban Politics (3 credits)

This course will explore urban politics in the U.S., first through an examination of the history of U.S. urban governance structures, namely machine politics and Progressive Era reform politics. As a bridge between the early era of city governance and contemporary urban life, we will examine the impact of suburbanization on the city. Our second segment will study and critique different ways of understanding urban power and governance, namely regime theory, privatism, managerialism, populism and progressivism. The third segment of the course will examine contemporary elements of the “urban crisis”, among them class, race and inequality. To highlight some of these issues, the final two weeks will be spent examining urban, public education as a policy arena where all three parts of the course will be placed in conversation.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 318 Pennsylvania Politics (3 credits)

This course is a study of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, its recent history, its politics, and the way its government is conducted. The course will have distinct, but overlapping emphases: The Political Environment: What are the political forces driving the agenda in this state? The issues: What are the issues that actually matter in this state? The Structure: How do the Governor's Office, the General Assembly, other statewide offices, and other departments of state government actually work? To assist in learning about these matters, several experienced and knowledgeable guest speakers will address the class. In addition, at various points in the semester, the class will be formed into a focus group to discuss various issues confronting the state.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 319 Public Opinion & Media (3 credits)

This course is a brief overview of the role of public opinion and media in American democracy. We hold attitudes about relevant political and social groups, many of which shape our thoughts and actions. Further, if government is to be “by the people,” understanding what “the people” want is of major importance to legislators, organized groups, and interested political scientists. The media, a critical source of political information, can inform the public, provide a mirror of public perception, but also shape ideas. In this course, we examine several complex questions: What is public opinion? Where does it come from? How and when does it change? Does everyone’s opinion matter equally?

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 320 Injustice & the Law (3 credits)

Fifty years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which eliminated most forms of de jure discrimination, we are still witnessing the lingering effects of de facto inequality within American society. To be sure, the CRA of 1964 and its subsequent amendments eliminated the use of discriminatory practices in housing, employment, business, and education. But overcoming de facto inequality has been harder to accomplish. What explains the gap between established legal doctrine and the reality of many Americans of color? The goal of the course is for students to study the potential and limits of law as a tool for social justice, as well as the role of law in the creation and maintenance of systems of racial injustice. Primarily through the lens of race, students will examine the empirical realities of laws and policies that were ostensibly passed to overcome injustice, broadly defined, as well as the sociopolitical causes and consequences of de facto racial segregation in American society.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 321 Belief and Belonging (3 credits)

What is the relationship between religion and political life in the United States? How does religion influence major dimensions of politics, public policy, and mass participation? Should citizens and policymakers in the U.S. base their political opinions on their religious beliefs? In this course, students will investigate the place of religion in American political life and discuss how religion informs contemporary politics. The principal aim is for students to understand how religion affects politics, and vice versa, and to develop a greater understanding of the vitality and variability of religion as a factor in American public life.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Faith Justice Course, Undergraduate

POL 322 Campaigns & Elections (3 credits)

The Campaigns and Elections course is an examination of modern American political campaigns, with a focus on the dramatic changes that have occurred in electoral politics in recent years. The course will have three distinct, but overlapping emphases: 1. The Strategic Campaign: How are campaigns carried on and managed? How should they be? What are the new technologies that have so drastically changed the nature of political campaigns? 2. Voting Behavior; what are the deep and fundamental changes that have occurred in voting behaviors and attitudes in recent years? What are the implications of these changes for the electoral process? 3. The Media and Campaigns: How do the media influence campaigns and electoral outcomes? What are the implications of the pervasive relationship between politics and the mass media? To assist in learning about the real world of politics, several guest speakers with considerable experience in political campaigns will address the class. In addition, at various points during the semester, the class will be formed into a focus group to discuss various campaign-related issues.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 323 Women and American Politics (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a critical examination of women as political actors in the United States. We will analyze various forms of women's political participation, both in the traditional spheres of what is considered politics -- women as voters and politicians -- and also in more "non-traditional" spheres of political activism. We will examine how women are mobilized to participate in politics, focusing keenly on the differences among women in their political activism in an effort to understand how the intersection of gender, race, class, sexuality, age, and ability influence women's political activism. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in the women and politics scholarship, mainly from a U.S. perspective. Students will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts scholars have developed as tools for thinking about the gendered political experience. In this course you will learn to "read" and analyze gender politically, exploring how it impacts our understanding of the political world.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Faith Justice Course, Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 324 Race & Ethnic Politics in U.S. (3 credits)

From its first days, the United States has faced the dilemma of how to incorporate populations different from the majority population into the polity. This dilemma continues today and appears in discussions of such issues as affirmative action, immigration and naturalization, language policy, and social welfare policy. In this course, we will examine the major theories that attempt to explain the roles of race and ethnicity in U.S. politics and the ways in which individuals use race and ethnicity as resources for political organization. We will examine the phenomenon of ethnicity and race in the political development of the United States. Finally, we will look at the political attitudes and behaviors of ethnic and racial populations in order to measure their contemporary political influence. Among the topics to be covered include the meaning of race and ethnicity, the history of racial and immigration politics, prejudice, group participation and mobilization, political representation, and public opinion.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Faith Justice Course, Undergraduate

POL 325 Contemp Am Social Movements (3 credits)

Social movements are considered as one of the motivating forces behind political, social, and cultural change and are often credited for fundamentally reshaping societal institutions. This course examines the contemporary social movements that have occurred since the mid-1960s, commonly defined as the “New Social Movements” (NSMs). This course will explore several of these movements and examine where, when, why, and how the movements emerged. Students will also analyze what made certain movements more successful than others.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 326 Protesting Inequality (3 credits)

Through the lens of political science, this course examines the political causes and consequences of inequality in the United States and how citizens have responded to the empirical realities of unequal circumstances. While inequality is an economically, politically, socially, and morally complex phenomenon, this course emphasizes that inequality does not “just happen” but rather is a result of the way our society is structured. Nevertheless, citizens—agents—have protested inequality on various occasions and in many different ways. It is on these citizen protest movements that we will focus most of our attention, including, but not limited to, the “Poor People’s Movements” of the 1960s, the Welfare Rights Movement in the 1990s, and the Occupy Movement of the 2010s.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Faith Justice Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 327 Environmental Politics in Am (3 credits)

In order to understand today’s controversies over fracking and global warming, this course examines the rise of environmentalism in America, moving from the progressive conservationism of Teddy Roosevelt through the environmentalism of Earth Day and the 1970’s to the present era. The course uses recent works in political science to establish the actors in environmental decision-making and implementation as we consider federalism and state environmental policy, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, markets and free trade, the Presidency, Congress, the Bureaucracy, and the Courts. The focus of all student work is current – unresolved – policy problems at the local, state, and national levels. One of the course highlights is a policy simulation.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 328 Politics of U.S. Immigration (3 credits)

In this course, students will critically engage with the politics of immigration in the United States. While the national narrative broadly celebrates the arrival and incorporation of newcomers, these processes have been highly contested and problematic both in popular discourse and public policy since the country’s founding. The question of ‘who immigrates’ has been, and continues to be, shaped by decisions on how to manage geopolitical and geoeconomic forces, domestic political, economic and social preferences, popular sentiment and humanitarian considerations. Furthermore, understanding how immigrants integrate in society necessarily involves examining ‘difference’ on a number of axes, including race and ethnicity, language and culture, religion, gender, socioeconomic and educational levels, and legal status. This course provides students with the opportunity to explore key aspects of the discourse and reality of immigration to the U.S., including the American Dream, assimilation, ethnic neighborhoods, transnationalism, borders and security by considering the values, interests and roles of actors at all levels, including civil society organizations, national and sub-national governments, communities, households and individuals in the continuous re-making of the U.S. as a nation of immigrants.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Irish Studies Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 331 Latin American Politics (3 credits)

This course addresses the political, economic and social development of modern Latin America. It examines the transformation of traditional authority structures, efforts to promote economic development, and concerns for the consolidation of democracy, adjustment to globalization, and U.S.-Latin American relations.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, International Relations Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Latin American Studies Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 333 Asian Democ at the Crossroads (3 credits)

This course will examine and discuss the political dynamics and policy behaviors of three successful democracies in Northeast Asia: Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. While all three countries are successful democracies with economic power, each country also faces a series of critical challenges in their politics, economy, and society. The global implications of their struggles are never trivial and the examination of three countries will provide us with the better grasp of contemporary global issues. The thematic focus of the course lies in the comparative analysis of each country in terms of political system, political economy, state-society relations, and foreign relations. To this end, the course will also explore the intricacies of the cultural, historical, and psychological contexts in which behavioral and policy motivations may be explained.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 334 Russian Politics (3 credits)

In 1917, the USSR was born out of the ashes of the Russian empire, and in 1991, it died. Since the Soviet Union disintegrated, Russia has struggled to develop a new national identity, a healthy economy, a well-functioning polity, an efficacious state, and a new orientation in world affairs. This course investigates the significance of the Soviet legacy for the contemporary political situation in Russia and evaluates the impact of new forces unleashed since the end of the communist era. In learning about the USSR and developments in today’s Russia, the class applies some of comparative politics’ “big concepts:” revolution, the state, the nation, federalism, totalitarianism, authoritarianism, and democracy.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 335 Comp Pol: Mid East & N. Africa (3 credits)

This course serves as an introduction to the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. This region comprises 24 countries (or more depending on who is counting!) and spans three continents. Historically it has produced all three of the world's major monotheistic faiths and served as the battleground of kings and crusaders. Currently it is home to nation states, transnational movements, and several on-going conflicts. This course will explore the political system, political economy, and societal components of several countries in the region as a starting point to challenge broader themes of nationalism, territoriality, and political power.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 336 The EU and European Politics (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a hands-on opportunity for learning about the politics of the European Union and its member states. As an organization that is both supranational and intergovernmental in nature, the EU’s actions are subject to the actions within its institutions and the decisions of its members. Therefore European politics has a great impact on what the Union does. The key and (unique) learning tools in this course are three simulations of EU institutions –the EU Parliament, the Councils of the EU, and the European Council. Students will take on roles of actual EU politicians and engage in policy making. The simulations will require students to perform extensive outside research to prepare to play their roles and will give participants an excellent understanding of these institutions and how they work. Class members will also become expert in the politics of “their” countries (the countries from which their alter egos are from) as well as on the issue under consideration (which will vary depending on pressing European and world events).

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Irish Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 337 Contemp Cuban Pol & Society (3 credits)

The Cuban revolution is one of the seminal events of Latin American twentieth century history. This course provides the tools to understand the forces that gave rise to the revolution, how 'the Revolution' has evolved over the more than five and a half decades since the Castro government has been in power, and how Cuban society has transformed – politically, economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus is placed on Cuba since the demise of the Soviet Union, the so called "Special Period," in which Cuba transitioned from a 2nd World client state into an isolated underdeveloped country. Political reforms since then have contributed to an aperture toward the outside world, as well as to steps towards greater economic freedom for Cubans. Many other topics, including race, gender, the arts, Cuba's foreign relations with the U.S. and the rest of the world, citizenship, religion, health care and Cuba's future, will be discussed as well.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, International Relations Course, Latin American Studies Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 338 Democracy: Perspect from Rome (3 credits)

This class offers is an introduction to democratic political processes and institutions by using Rome as a case study. Students will learn about politics and political change in modern Italy; about the structure, function, and dynamics of government and the political system; about the political theories and events that affect the current political climate; and about how citizens participate through these structures. We will first read a few classics on democracy and the democratic tradition to establish a foundation of theoretical reasoning before moving on to an examination of the empirical evidence of how the system of politics functions in Italy. An added, comparative function of this course will be a correlation of political institutions in the United States, urging students to reflect upon their own political environment.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

POL 339 Dictatorship: Asian Style (3 credits)

This course will examine and discuss the political dynamics and policy behaviors of two authoritarian communist regimes in East Asia: China and North Korea. What are the natures of Chinese and North Korean societies? What are the guiding principles and norms in their political systems? What are the historical as well as contemporary implications of their economic systems? To this end, this course will explore the intricacies of the cultural, historical, and psychological contexts in which behavioral and policy motivations could be explained. Along with the comparative analysis of each country (political system, political economy, state-society relations, and foreign relations), major contemporary issues and challenges will be also examined. Can Chinese Communist Party keep its authoritarian grip on its people forever? Will China ever be democratized? Has China’s long economic boom ended? What are the mechanisms behind North Korea’s tight and cruel control of its citizens and their devotion to the Kim dynasty? Can North Korea enter and survive the global economy? More fundamentally, where is China heading? What does North Korea want?

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 340 Political Geography (3 credits)

Political Geography is a course of political and spatial inquiry; it helps students compare and contrast people, places, and processes around the world. This course explores how spatial phenomena including physical geography, borders, and nation-states affect social and political phenomena including domestic, regional and global governance, differences and dynamics of power, and identity, and vice versa. Furthermore, Political Geography focuses on 'scale' - personal, local, regional, national, and global - to understand and explain patterns and processes, as well as conflict and cooperation in international affairs.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 350 Haunted by the Past (3 credits)

War apologies abound. Since the end of the Cold War, what we have been witnessing is a world-wide surge in memory. We are living in the era where collective apologies have become more and more common, and, as in Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka, to reconcile with the past has become critical part of contemporary politics of memory and regret. More concretely, this course will explore the following questions: Can a state apologize? Can the current generations apologize for the past wrongs and /or feel responsible? Or, should they? How do individuals articulate the link between identification with the state (and national pride) and sense of individual responsibility? How do individuals get their information about past wrongs? How much confidence do they have in the various sources (textbooks, mass media, internet, friends and family, etc.) at their disposal? Is reconciliation possible? Can memories go beyond national borders? Can it be something universal? The course will start with the introduction and examination of the role of history and memory in the (re-) formation of communal identity and explores for the possibility of communal reconciliation with past wrongs. Along with the examination of conceptual frameworks such as engagement and denial/avoidance, the ethical dimensions of political reconciliation will be discussed in terms of (1) retributive justice and (2) restorative justice.

Prerequisites: PHL 154 and POL 113 and POL 115

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, Ethics Intensive (New GEP), International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 351 International Human Rights (3 credits)

The tension between sovereignty and the promotion and protection of human rights remains one of the primary issues in contemporary global politics. This course focuses upon human rights, their status as international law, and the major issues in the implementation and enforcement of that law. The course will open with an overview of the philosophy of human rights, followed by discussion of the history of human rights, the international law of human rights, and the role of human rights in foreign policy. Throughout, students will study various mechanisms for the promotion, protection, and implementation of international human rights, including those of international organizations such as the United Nations, and those of non- governmental organizations such as Amnesty International. Whenever possible, the discussion of legal issues will relate to contemporary developments in human rights, and to issues of US foreign policy involving considerations of human rights. An additional focus will be on the human rights implications of globalization.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 352 Global Political Economy (3 credits)

Global economic relations are international, political and complex; they involve cross border flows of goods, money, services and people, and they reflect and create power. This course focuses on the nature and impact of the movement of goods (trade), capital (money, foreign direct investment, bailouts), services (call centers), people (migration), and even "bads" (pollution and disease) to understand the challenges of and opportunities for development, globalization and international cooperation in today's world. It emphasizes the analysis of historic booms and busts in various national economies as well as current global events and trends.

Prerequisites: POL 115

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

POL 354 War and Peace (3 credits)

Why do wars occur and how does peace "break out" and become habituated in the relationships and politics among states and within nations? Traditionally, students of international relations have focused on wars and war prevention while assuming that peace was simply the absence of interstate violence. This course will investigate the major theories explaining the outbreak of conflict, and it will also explore definitions of peace and theories accounting for the building peace among states that were enemies and rivals, as well as the transformation of previously war-torn societies into places where normal political conflict is resolved through negotiation and institutional channels instead of with violence.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Faith Justice Course, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 356 American Foreign Policy (3 credits)

This course explores US foreign policy since the end of World War II. After a conceptual introduction (Part I) which explores the utility of interests, institutions, and ideas for accounting for American policy, the course examines the US-Soviet competition and the ways that that “cold” conflict affected U.S. behavior not only toward the USSR, but also toward other regions (Part II). Part III investigates the early post-Cold War period and the attempts and failures in constructing some kind of “New World Order,” and Part IV explores how the US has been responding to the twin challenges of terrorism and globalization.

Attributes: American Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 361 Theories of Intl Relations (3 credits)

Central to the study of international relations is a solid understanding of the theoretical literature. While the introductory course gives students a taste of the field, serious students must spend more time exploring the arguments and implications of realism, liberalism, constructivism, Marxism,feminism and the various ontological and epistemological debates that underlie the intellectual competition and scholarly endeavors within and between the advocates of the various paradigms. This course provides that solid foundation, allows students to understand the state of the field today and gives them opportunity to evaluate these theoretical traditions and their ability to account for global politics. Any student considering graduate study in global affairs, regardless of major (e.g. Economics, English, History, International Relations, Political Science, Sociology, etc.) should take this class.

Prerequisites: POL 115

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 364 East Asia: War and Peace (3 credits)

The course will examine and discuss the most intriguing dynamics of international relations in East Asia. Along with the historical analysis of international relation in the region since the mid-19th century, the course will engage in the discussion of pressing issues that characterize contemporary international politics in the region, including (1) regional economic development and interactions, (2) Sino-Taiwanese tension and the U.S. involvement, (3) North Korean nuclear crisis, (4) Japan and its post-Cold War security profile, and (5) regional tension over Japan’s militaristic past.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 367 Ethics in Internation Affairs (3 credits)

What is morality in international politics? Is ethical reasoning and action possible in international affairs? If possible, when and how? Proponents of Realism often claim that there is virtually no room for morality in international affairs, and states and state actors are rational thinkers interacting in anarchy. For them, ethics are simply luxury and irrelevant. On the other hand, thinkers under the tradition of IR liberalism/idealism emphasize the ethical dimension of state decision making and state behaviors. On what moral ground or ethical reasoning, are the moral behaviors taking place and observed/unobserved? The primary objective of the course is to help students enhance their analytical ability for the study of international ethics. To this end, the course will explore the main traditions and theories of international ethics with a focus on such topical areas as just war and use of force, universal human rights and humanitarian intervention, and national collective memory and post-conflict reconciliation.

Prerequisites: (PHL 154 and POL 113 and POL 115)

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), International Relations Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

POL 368 Women, Gender & World Politics (3 credits)

To some scholars and policy makers, the idea that conditions in which women and girls live is important to global politics is almost ridiculous, but others stress that until we understand how “gender makes the world go around” (Cynthia Enloe), we will fail to (1) see accurately the nature of power, (2) achieve just outcomes for all people, and (3) understand how masculinity and femininity affect the political and social world. This course exposes students to the development of feminism (a body of thought that advocates for female, and more recently, gender, equality) and examines the extent to which women have become empowered in politics in their own countries, as well as globally. Moreover, many feminist scholars and activists have become sensitive to the ways that elements of a person’s identity (race, class, gender, national origin, ethnicity, etc.) intersect in complex ways to provide her with elements of privilege and/or disadvantage. A central contention of this course is that empowerment is more than simply achieving the vote or becoming an elected official, and traditionally, some people (based on identity) have had an easier time achieving access and opportunities than have others. Empowerment means that all persons, regardless of gender, have influence over decisions that matter to them, security (both at home and in the global arena), economic opportunities, and are treated justly (are believed to possess inalienable human rights that are not somehow forfeited because of their gender).

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Gender Studies Course, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 370 Special Topics (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, these courses will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., The Presidential Election, The Arab Spring, Guns and the Supreme Court). Students may count only two POLs 270 and/or 370 courses for major or minor credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 402 Capstone: Contenious Pol in US (3 credits)

Contentious politics consists of many “non-traditional” forms of political action, including social movements, protests, riots, and even political violence. This capstone political science seminar examines contentious politics in the U.S. through the lens of 1960/70s radical social movements, a key moment in U.S. politics in which the New Left imagined, theorized, negotiated, and contested the meaning of democracy and power. Students will examine and analyze the origins, ideologies, claims/grievances, goals, and strategies of radical political groups that roughly fall under the banner of the New Left: anti-war, feminism, black liberation, American Indian Movement, Chicano Movement, and Gay Liberation. We will study the politics of the struggle over rights, democracy, power, and the use/nonuse of violence within the New Left through a careful study of the primary texts (statements, agendas, etc.) produced by these groups. Students will investigate what the New Left helps us understand about power, politics, and violence in a modern democracy and evaluate the effectiveness of protest as a means to forward a political agenda, broadly defined.

Prerequisites: POL 111 and POL 117 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Political Science.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 403 Capstone: Nations&Nationalism (3 credits)

The primary objective of this seminar is to help students enhance their analytical abilities for the study of contemporary national problematique. In the rapidly changing contemporary global world, why are people still attracted, swayed, and annoyed by what is national? What is so important about being a part of nation? What drives people to develop specific allegiance toward a nation? And, how? More fundamentally, what is a nation?

Prerequisites: POL 113 and POL 115 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 404 Capstone: Revolts&Revolutions (3 credits)

Why do revolts against governments deemed illegitimate occur and when do they become full-fledged revolutions? This course explores both the causes of uprisings and the conditions under which they succeed in bringing about new political and social orders by examining (1) what happened in the “great” revolutions, (2) how scholars have accounted for them, and (3) examining more recent instances of revolts which have sometimes failed and others succeeded. In this study, students will develop their writing and research skills, having the opportunity to find various types of information, write different forms of essays, and appropriately cite and present their materials.

Prerequisites: POL 113 and POL 115 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 407 Capstone: Theories of Justice (3 credits)

What is political justice? We begin with an in-depth reading of the work that has defined justice in the 20th and 21st centuries: John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice. We will also read selections from Rawls’ Political Liberalism and his work on international justice, The Law of Peoples. In order to consider alternative theories of justice and criticisms of Rawls, we will read classic critical commentaries in the form of articles and book chapters from Michael Walzer, Michael Sandel, Alistair MacIntyre, Ronald Dworkin, Susan Okin, Robert Nozick, Brian Barry, Amartya Sen, and James Fishkin. Course requires in-depth reading of major political theorists of justice and encourages a sophisticated understanding of political justice through the weekly writing of critical, interpretive, and comparative essays. Students are encouraged to compare and contrast theories in order to develop a vocabulary of political ideology (liberalism, communitarianism, conservatism, feminism, legalism, utilitarianism, and post-modernism) as well as an understanding of different types of justice (e.g., distributive v. restorative).

Prerequisites: PHL 154 and POL 111 and POL 117 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Political Science.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 408 Capstone: The Armed Citizen? (3 credits)

What is the role of firearms in a constitutional democracy? Do guns pose a threat, prevent tyranny, or secure rights? This seminar interrogates (1) the meaning of the Second Amendment in the context of the creation of the Constitution and current controversies over the relationship between firearms and violence in the U.S. (2) the interpretations of the U.S. Supreme Court in Heller v. District of Columbia (2008) and (3) the theoretical issues raised by guns in a constitutional democracy (including Stand Your Ground laws). The course demands reading primary and secondary texts in political theory, public law, and history.

Prerequisites: POL 111 and POL 117 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Political Science.

Attributes: Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 409 Capstone:Contemp Internt Migra (3 credits)

Migration has become a topic of increasing focus and concern in the 21st century, with some arguing that it will be one of the defining issues of our time. This is certainly the case for those tens of millions of individuals who are currently on the move, for the sending communities and societies from which them emigrate and the destinations that receive them, and the nation-states that control their entrance and exit. In this seminar, we will cover the “big” issues of migration in a comparative format through engagement with some of the most important examples of the extensive body of literature in Migration Studies. Concretely, we will critically examine: the demographics of migration in key regions of the world; theories that explain mobility; host-immigrant relations and integration; the role of gender, race, and ethnicity in migration; the growth of transnational ties as an aspect of globalization; security; and the analysis of immigration policies and citizenship. Throughout the course of the semester, we will question continually challenge ourselves to question the approach to migration as a problem to be solves versus as a process to manage. As a capstone seminar, Global Migration as Problem and Process includes reading requirements that are extensive and challenging and approaches learning through a collective approach as we share our individual insights and understandings. We will learn from each other. Students must come to class having read the assignment materials critically so that we can grapple with ideas and engage in debate. Avid participation is required. There will be minimal formal lecturing and most seminar time will consist of open discussion. Furthermore, this capstone will draw upon the knowledge students have gained from many of their other Political Science classes. The course materials will draw heavily from empirical evidence (qualitative and quantitative) to explore the topics discussed above, while applying major theoretical concepts in Political Science. Students should come prepared to integrate the knowledge they have gained over the past four years.

Prerequisites: POL 113 and POL 115 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 411 Washington Internship I (3 credits)

At The Washington Center (see Special Academic Programs and Services for more information), students are placed in an internship where they work 30-35 hours in an office making substantive contributions to its work in politics, public policy, law, advocacy, or other related fields. For these activities, students earn two courses worth of upper division credit. Please note: the other courses at the Washington Center do not count for POL major or minor credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 412 Washington Internship II (3 credits)

At The Washington Center (see Special Academic Programs and Services for more information), students are placed in an internship where they work 30-35 hours in an office making substantive contributions to its work in politics, public policy, law, advocacy, or other related fields. For these activities, students earn two courses worth of upper division credit. Please note: the other courses at the Washington Center do not count for POL major or minor credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 413 International Internship I (3 credits)

Some study abroad programs offer internship credit for one or two classes. Please note: subject to administrative approval, students may earn two courses of UD POL credit if their internship is in the 32- hour/week range.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 414 International Internship II (3 credits)

Some study abroad programs offer internship credit for one or two classes. Please note: subject to administrative approval, students may earn two courses of UD POL credit if their internship is in the 32- hour/week range.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 470 Research in the Discipline (3 credits)

This course is designated for an independent study project in consultation with and approval from a specific faculty member. Depending on the faculty member, the project will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science or International Relations.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 490 Global Smarts Internship (3 credits)

The Global Smarts Internship allows students to intern with the prestigious World Affairs Council of Philadelphia while making a commitment to social justice. Mentors travel to under-resourced middle schools in Philadelphia to prepare 8th graders for a city-wide Model United Nations event in May in which the middle-schoolers compete with students from elite private and well-funded suburban schools. As Global Smarts mentors help their middle-school students with skills and content, they develop their own academic skills (e.g. oral presentation, research, and writing) and their work experience. During this semester, mentors help their students understand two important issues of justice (previous topics have included ending forced labor, women's education, and providing clean and affordable energy). Throughout the semester, students reflect critically and consciously about their service and the systemic injustice in Philadelphia’s public education system. This opportunity for community-engaged learning requires an interview in Fall (several weeks before Spring registration).

Attributes: International Relations Course, Service Learning Course, Undergraduate

POL 491 Philadelphia-Area Internship (3 credits)

Supervised internships in the Philadelphia area provide students an opportunity to intern with elected officials, public interest organizations, party organizations, and many other groups involved with politics and policy including the Philadelphia DA’s office, CBS, or Senator Casey’s office. The course helps student: (1) develop tools for a job search; (2) professional writing skills (e.g. resume and cover letter); and (3) integrate academic skills into professional life. The course allows students to choose any organization related to politics, policy, or law. Course credit available for International Relations and/or Justice and Ethics in the Law – with permission of the internship coordinator and the program director. Course counts for POL or IR credit once. With permission of the internship coordinator and POL department chair, course can be taken by POL and IR majors a second time as an elective. Course is open to ALL majors.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 493 Honors Research in Pol Sci I (3 credits)

Majors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in Political Science courses may apply to the Honors Program to earn College Honors. Applications are due in Spring of the junior year for the right to perform a year-long research project under the supervision of a Political Science Department member. To succeed in the application, the student should be in conversation with that faculty member early on in the junior year. Then, the student works closely with her/his mentor over the course of the senior year to prepare and present a thesis that passes the scrutiny of the mentor, an outside faculty reader with complementary expertise, and a member of the Honors Committee. Specific requirements for the College Honors thesis may be found under “Honors Program”. Prior approval from the Honors Program and Department is necessary. Students who complete Departmental Honors are not required to take a POL Capstone Course. One semester of HON research counts for the Capstone Course and the other for an upper division POL course.

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 494 Honors Research in Pol Sci II (3 credits)

Majors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in Political Science courses may apply to the Honors Program to earn College Honors. Applications are due in Spring of the junior year for the right to perform a year-long research project under the supervision of a Political Science Department member. To succeed in the application, the student should be in conversation with that faculty member early on in the junior year. Then, the student works closely with her/his mentor over the course of the senior year to prepare and present a thesis that passes the scrutiny of the mentor, an outside faculty reader with complementary expertise, and a member of the Honors Committee. Specific requirements for the College Honors thesis may be found under “Honors Program”. Prior approval from the Honors Program and Department is necessary. Students who complete Departmental Honors are not required to take a POL Capstone Course. One semester of HON research counts for the Capstone Course and the other for an upper division POL course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 101 Intro to Sociology (3 credits)

Introduction to the scientific approach to the study of society, including the study of social structures; studies such topics as how we acquire self-identity, gender, our behavior in groups, bureaucracies, stereotyping, the role of the state, survey research, culture, and collective behavior.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 102 Social Problems (3 credits)

A sociological analysis of contemporary social issues including economic crises, concentration of wealth, poverty, crime, sexism, race and ethnic relations, mental illness, population growth, war and peace, and relations with other countries.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 140 Wage Gap Seminar-Gender Series (3 credits)

This course focuses on evaluating and discussing quantitative and qualitative literature to understand issues surrounding gender based wage disparities and its impact upon women in the labor market. Students will not only focus on examining long-term trends in the gender pay gap but also focus on the impact of the education, employment policies, state and federal laws/regulations in ensuring economic wellbeing. This seminar is ideal opportunity for anyone interested in researching and reporting on gender based equality issues.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Adult Learning Seminar, Undergraduate

SOC 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

This freshman seminar course examines the most significant contemporary social problems in our culture. Issues are examined from a sociological perspective that is enhanced by students’ work at service sites. This is the second part of a two-semester course sequence for first year students.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

SOC 170 Special Topics in Sociology (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 190 Rsch Mthds in Social Sciences (3 credits)

This introductory course in research methods prepares students to understand and apply the techniques and methods of descriptive and inferential research as they are applied to the social sciences. Topics include the scientific method, ethical issues in research, survey design, research design, and basic analysis of data. This foundational course of study will take the student through the various steps of a traditional research design.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 150 or SOC 202

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 201 Schools in Society (3 credits)

SOC 202 Adv Stud of Soc Prob FS & SL (3 credits)

SOC 204 Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)

SOC 205 Ethnic & Minority Relations (3 credits)

This course provides an analysis of relationships between dominant and minority groups, with a particular focus on ethnic and racial stratification in the U.S. As part of this discussion, we focus on intersecting statuses that shape the outcomes of individuals and groups experiences, including their interactions with each other and social institutions. While the course largely focuses on issues of race/ethnicity, we will also address other forms of minority-dominant group relations, such as sexual orientation, social class, and gender, as the intersectionality of statuses is important in any attempt to gain a better understanding of all these types of relationships. We begin the course by addressing the issue of race as a social construct rather than a biological fact, but a construction that carries very real consequences. We then shift to a focus on prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination, with particular attention on how they serve to create, sustain, and reproduce oppression and inequalities. We then examine how privileged statuses, particularly white privilege serve to marginalize nonwhites and the damaging paradox of this privilege for economically disenfranchised whites. We conclude the course by addressing the future of face and racism in the 21st century, such as colorblind racism, and the implications for coalition building across racial/ethnic lines.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 206 Theories of Crime (3 credits)

The goal of this course is to examine the current state of criminological theory. It examines the efforts of criminologists in various academic disciplines to explain the cause of crime. Traditional theories will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 207 Juvenile Justice (3 credits)

A study of delinquency and its causes, with attention to both social-psychological and structural-theoretical frameworks.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 208 Sociology of Gender (3 credits)

The study of the learned patterns of behavior of males and females in the United States and cross-culturally; topics include hormonal and sex differences, gender socialization, the contemporary women’s movement; special emphasis is placed upon the connection of sexism, racism, and class inequality.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 209 Sociology of IntimateRelations (3 credits)

Examines family life in the United States, its cross-cultural and historical antecedents; current changes and family process, including courtship and marriage in contemporary society.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 210 African-American Catholicism (3 credits)

A sociological analysis of religion is as old as sociology itself, and race is one of the key themes in sociology. This course will combine the two themes by using a sociological lens to study African-American Catholicism. We will begin by examining theoretical perspectives that can then be used to study Black American Catholicism. We will use these theoretical perspectives to examine several key works by historians, theologians, and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops that tell the story of African-American Catholics in the United States.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 211 Classical Sociological Theory (3 credits)

SOC 214 Sociology of Youth (3 credits)

SOC 216 Alcohol, Drugs & Society (3 credits)

This course explores a sociological approach to substance use and its impact on contemporary American society. What social factors such as gender, race, and class shape substance use? How do major social institutions such as criminal justice, education, and health care deal with substance use? What public policies and programs exist to regulate substance use, and how well do they work? Examples of topics discussed include women and substance use, college student binge drinking, substance use on the national agenda, and the community impact of crack cocaine.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 217 Mental Health & Society (3 credits)

This course examines the connections between mental health and society. What are the major forms of mental and behavioral health and illness? How widespread are mental disorders and what predicts their occurrence? What impact do they have on society and institutions such as health care and criminal justice? What professions and organizations treat mental disorders?

Attributes: American Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 218 Social Gerontology (3 credits)

SOC 219 Social Deviance (3 credits)

This course examines examples of deviance, e.g., the Holocaust, state terror and torture, and mental illness. It explores how laypersons and experts conceptualize deviance, how definitions of deviance change, who labels behavior deviant, and the consequences for those labeled deviant.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 225 Intro to American CJ (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the criminal justice system in the U.S. The primary goal of this course is to foster a general understanding of the functions and impact of the 3 components of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. In addressing these components, we will examine each component from the due process and crime control perspectives of criminal justice. Due process stresses individual rights while crime control stresses the protection of the society at large Some of the topics that we will cover include policing, the courts, incarceration and alternative sanctions, the War on Drugs, and the War on Terrorism. The course will conclude with a discussion of the future of criminal justice.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 231 Probation and Parole (3 credits)

SOC 232 Sociology of Human Sexuality (3 credits)

This course examines anthropological and sociological perspectives on human sexuality. Among the topics to be covered: reproductive ritual; deviant patterns of sexual behavior; ideologies of sexuality; legal shaping of sexual behavior; and the methods by which we obtain good information on sexual behavior.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 234 Federal Crim Law & Prosecution (3 credits)

SOC 235 Federal Search & Seizure (3 credits)

SOC 237 Human Origns & Prehist of Cult (3 credits)

SOC 238 Violence & Society (3 credits)

SOC 241 American Labor Movement (3 credits)

SOC 243 Sexuality & Relationships (3 credits)

SOC 245 Law and Social Policy (3 credits)

SOC 246 CJ Ethics & Legal Responsblty (3 credits)

SOC 247 Organized Crime (3 credits)

This course provides an historical foundation and comprehensive examination of organized crime that will guide the student through the various developments of this criminal activity. Besides the stereotypical organized crime viewpoints, which are often portrayed on television and in movie theatres, this course will also explore other unusual and less known perspectives of modern day organized crime. Students will utilize critical thinking exercises and ethical perspectives while developing a keen understanding of how organized crime is associated with such activities as human trafficking, computer and Internet crime, vehicle smuggling, and terrorism.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 249 Federal CJ (3 credits)

This course will examine the criminal justice at the federal level. The main areas are the role of each branch of government; how agencies are funded; the major investigation, prosecution, probation, and correction elements; and individual investigative agencies including Inspector General. The course will cover the mission of and interrelationships among individual agencies.

Prerequisites: SOC 225

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 250 Found of Adds for CJ Professnl (3 credits)

SOC 251 Gender and the Law (3 credits)

SOC 252 Media & Popular Culture (3 credits)

This course will examine the organization of contemporary media and popular culture from a variety of sociological perspectives. Particular attention will be paid to the production and consumption of popular music, talk shows, and sporting events. There will be discussion on how fads spread through society, how our identities are shaped by and mediated through popular culture, and why the media focuses so much attention on seemingly mundane events. This class will examine how recent technological changes influence how we consume popular culture. We will utilize discussions of Nike, Netflix, Starbucks, videogames, nightlife in Philadelphia, Shakespeare, and digital gambling to understand how popular culture is organized.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 253 Race and Social Justice (3 credits)

In this course we will examine the issue of social justice as it pertains to race and ethnicity. The course will address the social and cultural constructions of race and ethnicity and their effects on social institutions, interpersonal relationships, and quality of life primarily in the U.S., but also abroad. Specifically, we will focus on how advantages and disadvantages are distributed among individuals and societies, why this process occurs, and how we can work to achieve balance and equality. As part of our discussions, we will focus on the contributions of racial and ethnic minorities in our changing social, economic, political, and legal institutions by examining controversial topics central to debates on racial justice and policy.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 254 Violence and Victims (3 credits)

This course is designed to explore the serious problem of violence in our society from a sociological perspective. We will address a variety of types of violence, its causes, consequences, and theories for prevention. Topics which will be discussed include wife abuse, rape, child abuse, gang warfare, and street violence. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the structural causes of violence such as gender, race, and social class inequality as well as the effect of pornography, the media, and drugs/alcohol on violence. Particular attention will be given to the consequences of violence for both individual victims and society as a whole. We will also focus on the practical reality of violence in this society by speaking with several practitioners and touring a local domestic violence shelter.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 259 Youth, Culture & Deviance (3 credits)

This course offers economic, cultural, political and social perspectives on American youth based on sociological theory. Special attention will be paid to youth popular cultures and the unique social problems facing young adults (e.g., gangs, drugs, suicide and teen pregnancy).

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 260 Language and the Law (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to linguistic issues that influence interaction in a variety of legal contexts. It explores the role of language used in court cases and police investigations while paying special attention to particular discourse contexts such as courtroom talk, interpreter interactions and police interrogations/ interviews. Particular emphasis will be placed on recognizing and understanding ethical issues related to linguistic sources of disadvantage before the law for both educated and uneducated native speakers, minority speakers and non-native speakers of a given language. This course will help prepare students for careers in which a particular sensitivity to, and understanding of, the use of language is vital. By looking closely at areas studied by linguists, we will seek to uncover the role and the ethical nature of oral and written interactions that take place in the legal field. These linguistic issues affect the concept of justice as well as its application in the legal system and also influence how humans are perceived and, in turn, treated by those who apply the law (police officers, lawyers, judges, etc.). This course fulfills a requirement in the Sociology and Criminal Justice majors/minors

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 261 Intro to Crim Investigation (3 credits)

Teaches students how to gather the maximum amount of information necessary to solve a crime efficiently, e.g., from witnesses, suspects, informants, surveillants, as well as from the physical evidence at the crime scene. Suggested also for prelaw students.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 262 White Collar Crime (3 credits)

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the meaning of white collar crime and the types of activities in which white collar criminals engage. Initially, the lectures focus on the development of a comprehensive definition of white collar crime and then, having established this foundation, turn to the variety of white collar crimes in the U.S. today.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 263 Criminology (3 credits)

SOC 264 Crim Courts & Crim Procedures (3 credits)

An analysis of the legal and practice problems presented in the administration of criminal justice from investigation to post-conviction review. Subjects include right to counsel, law of arrest, search and seizure, police interrogation and confessions, prosecutorial discretion, plea bargaining, bail, and juries. Case method used. Suggested for pre-law students.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 265 Sociology of Education (3 credits)

Schools are the center of major contemporary social questions: Who benefits come from going to college, and is it worth the high cost? Are standardized tests helpful for measuring accomplishment or potential? Are students from particular schools, states, or family backgrounds doing better than others? Sociology of education tackles these kinds of questions by examining the many roles that schools and school actors play, from socializing individuals to reproducing status over generations. This class provides an introduction to American education. Readings focus on primary and secondary education, with a focus on education’s role in stratification, namely the way that schools provide advantages or disadvantages to individuals according to particular characteristics, most commonly race/ethnicity, class, and gender.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 267 Introduction to Corrections (3 credits)

An analysis of the history and development of modern correctional systems. The focus will be on the corrections process as experienced by both offender and official. Special topics will include prisoner rights, litigation, women and corrections, and juveniles and the correctional process. Cross-cultural perspectives and recent correctional innovations will also be examined in order to give the student a comprehensive view.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 269 Introd to Law Enforcement (3 credits)

Principles of maintaining the legal system with reference to its community of responsibility; individual and interacting procedures of the various agencies through which persons involved are processed; structures and interrelationships of the federal, state, and local jurisdictions.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 270 Special Topics (3 credits)

Course content determined by instructor. This course number/title will be given to new courses being offered within the academic year that are not listed in the catalog. The course will explore some topic related to sociology or criminal justice, focusing on the role of institutions in explaining human behavior.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 271 Sociology of Migration (3 credits)

This course will take a global view of immigration by examining flows across the world and within the United States in particular. While globalization on one level has existed for thousands of years, we are currently in a phase where people, goods, and cultures are exchanged internationally in a quicker and more intensive way than ever before. These flows are shaped by international agreements such as the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and by national immigration laws. Though our focus will be on the United States, we will compare current immigration patterns and experiences in other nations as well.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 273 Collective Bargaining (3 credits)

SOC 274 Sports in Society (3 credits)

This course focuses on sports as social and cultural phenomena. It is designed to highlight the elements of sports, its participants, its values, and its relationship to American society.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 275 Law of Industrial Relations (3 credits)

SOC 276 Terrorism,Intelligence&Enforce (3 credits)

The focus of this course is directed toward law enforcement and intelligence issues that are employed to defeat, deny, disrupt terrorism, diminish the threat of, and defend against terrorism. This course introduces the student to various contemporary terrorist groups, current events, investigative and operational methodologies employed by the law enforcement and intelligence communities, and to weapons of mass destruction. This course is interactive through the use of exercises that allow students to experience how law enforcement and intelligence responds to the threat of terrorism.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 277 Intel:Law Enforcement Function (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the law enforcement intelligence community. Tangential to the national intelligence community, law enforcement intelligence is discussed in the context of federal, state, county, municipal, and local jurisdictions. The intelligence process is examined, as are the types. Intelligence is debated and illustrated as a management tool, and a support activity focusing on complex investigations. Law enforcement intelligence, as a mechanism that strives to produce knowledge, is discussed in the context of law enforcement agencies being learning organizations.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 280 Music and Deviance (3 credits)

This course explores the cultural, political, and social perspectives of 20th century music, and its engagement as a necessarily deviant cultural movement. Special attention will be paid to popular culture and specific eras, as well as how musicians have used their stage power to resist, reward, and recreate long-standing cultural codes.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 150 or SOC 202

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 281 Benefits & Compensation (3 credits)

SOC 285 Sociology of Medicine (3 credits)

This course is designed to give the student a general introduction to the myriad ways culture, society, and organizations impact medicine and health care. This course is designed to give the student a general introduction to the material and there are no prerequisites for the course. Students will cover topics as diverse as the institution and profession of medicine, the practice of medical care, and the social factors that contribute to sickness and well-being. While we will not cover everything, we will attempt to cover as much of the field as possible through four central thematic units: (1) the organization of development of the profession of medicine, (2) the delivery of health-care, (3) social cultural factors in defining health, and (4) the social causes of illness. Throughout the course, our discussions will be designed to understand the social science and policy implications for the field of medicine and encourage the application of such ideas and concepts to a variety of contemporary healthcare issues.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 286 Vio in Intimate Relationships (3 credits)

SOC 287 Sex, Gender & Family in Cults (3 credits)

This course will look at cults/new religious movements in relation to the larger culture; looking at the most recent wave of cults/movements in our history, dating back to the early 1960’s and continuing to the present. We will start by looking at the historical and social background of the most recent cults, then move on to discussion of the various terms, and the perspectives behind terms, that are used to describe these groups. We will use social psychology, more specifically, the social influence perspective, to explain why people join, stay in, and leave cults and will focus on sex, gender, and family patterns in cults/new religious movements.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 300 CommEngSch:BldgPart thru Rsrch (3 credits)

Engaged scholarship can take several forms. Broadly defined, it “means connecting the rich resources of the university to our most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems” (Boyer, 1996, p. 19). One key way of sharing these resources is through research – not “on” the community, but “with” the community. This type of research model is one in which the research projects are developed with community organization staff, faculty, and students together, building on the unique strengths of those involved. In this course, students will work with a community-based organization to design and conduct research on an issue related to homelessness or affordable housing. Throughout the semester, students will learn about research methods, research ethics, and the particular urban context within which they will be working. More importantly, students will gain experience working alongside staff of a community-based organization to solve problems or assess needs and strengths.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Honors Course, Undergraduate

SOC 301 CommunityOrganizing forJustice (3 credits)

How should one respond in the face of social injustice? What strategies should groups adopt in organizing to make positive social change? What kind of foundation is useful and prophetic for promoting justice? This course will consider the framework, methods, and practices of faith-based community organizing for responding to social injustice. Students will examine theological and sociological roots of faith-based community organizing as a response to injustice. Students will also integrate course learning with a community organizing action project.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 310 Policing in Black and Blue (3 credits)

The killing of Trayvon Martin and the rise of Black Lives Matter has thrust the nation's police departments into a state of crisis. The public's distrust of the police is at a 20 year high, despite the falling rates of crime nationally. In this course, students will look at the role of police in society and consider the social, economic, and cultural factors that have led to the current climate. We will take care to examine this crisis from multiple viewpoints, including: community residents, politicians, activists and the police themselves. In our study of the policing crisis, we will consider the sociological roots of the urban ghetto and how policing strategies were developed to "manage" racially segregated, high crime communities. Specifically we will consider how the police became the first-responders in dealing with a host of social problems (from poverty to addiction and mental illness), paying particular attention to the war on drugs, mass-incarceration, mandatory sentencing and zero tolerance. We will review stop and frisk, community policing, focused deterrence, stop snitching, de-escalation, and the use of force. Criminal Justice course

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 311 Research Methods II (3 credits)

SOC 312 Social Research Methods I (3 credits)

Presents the main ways of gathering social scientific information, e.g., questionnaires, interviews, observation, experiments, content analysis, etc.; Specific emphasis placed on the ethical considerations when conducting social science research.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate Day Division level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 313 Data Analysis (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for conducting quantitative data analysis. Using the General Social Survey and other publicly available data sets, we will learn about transforming variables, conducting univariate and bivariate analysis, requesting descriptive and inferential statistics, and learning how to interpret these statistics. Emphasis is on doing the analysis and presenting the analysis for research projects. This course is a prerequisite for Seminar, SOC 495.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 314 The Criminal Offender (3 credits)

The Criminal Offender is an interface between the law and mental health. This course examines the components of human behavior that bring people into a judicial setting. Content will cover criminal personalities, forensic interview, and the role of forensic psychology and psychiatry. Domestic violence offenders, sex offenders, stalkers, gang members, and offenders who commit hate crimes and homicide will be discussed. Definitions and dynamics of criminal motherhood and the psychodynamics of violent juvenile offenders will be presented. Use of the internet and various forms of social media by offenders will also be discussed.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 315 Cult of Addictn: ST Amsterdam (3 credits)

SOC 316 Fair Trade:Coffee-Co-Op to Cup (3 credits)

This course is designed to trace the path of fair trade coffee beans as they are grown in a cooperative in Nicaragua until they reach a consumers’ cup in the United States. In this class, we will examine the labor- intensive activities that go into producing a cup of coffee, the environmental impacts of producing shade grown and organic coffees, and the economic benefits that farmers receive for growing coffee in Central America. We will travel to Nicaragua and live alongside coffee farmers who are growing fair trade coffee. We will learn about the “Coffee Crisis” that greatly affected Central American farmers in the early 2000s, and we will look at the limits and possibilities of producing coffee in a cooperative. Prior to attending the trip we will read about the political and economic dynamics of Central America, the history of coffee and the fair trade movement, and what fair trade means in the minds of ethical consumers. In thinking about the stories behind their purchases, students will gain broader insight into the limits and possibilities of integrating their values into their everyday shopping patterns.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 317 Sociolinguistics (3 credits)

(Please see LIN 317 for description)

Attributes: Communication Studies ILC Crs, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 318 Social Just:Dominican Republic (3 credits)

SOC 320 Sociology of Work (3 credits)

SOC 322 Cult & Politics of Motherhood (3 credits)

The course considers motherhood as a political and cultural issue in society. Topics will include the social construction of public debates about teenage mothers, single mothers, welfare mothers, and abortion. We will also review the work of scholars who examine how social class and privilege construct our notions of "good" mothers and appropriate childrearing. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 323 Health and Society (3 credits)

An overview of health care in the United States with attention to its historical antecedents; definitions of illnesses; examines the effect of social factors on the occurrence of illness and its treatment; studies the organization of health facilities. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 325 Women and Health (3 credits)

This course will look at the health industry from a feminist perspective. We will examine the role of women in providing health care, gender differences in the care given to patients, and health care issues specific to women. The course will also consider race and class differences among women working in and served by the health care industry.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 326 Emerging Issues Adulthood (3 credits)

SOC 327 Sociology of Religion (3 credits)

Examines major sociological attempts to interpret the role of religious belief systems in modern industrial society and culture with emphasis on: a historical and structural analysis of religious belief systems and polities in the United States; the role of religion in community formation, national, and ethnic identity; and contemporary religious movements as attempts to channel or cope with forces of change.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 328 The Wire (3 credits)

Although journalists and media critics around the world have heaped deserved acclaim on The Wire, many people do not recognize its contribution to social science. Students in this seminar will watch, critique, and discuss selected episodes of The Wire along with assigned readings on urban inequality, crime, and violence that relate to these episodes. The assigned readings will feature academic books and research articles that describe and analyze life and experiences in inner city neighborhoods, as well as the social, economic, political, and cultural factors that shape or influence these experiences.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science

SOC 330 Urban Sociology (3 credits)

What makes some neighborhoods in cities great places to live? Why do other neighborhoods struggle? In this course, we will learn how sociologists study cities, what social policies have affected cities, how inequalities along the lines of race/ethnicity and social class have shaped cities, how cities might fit into a sustainable vision for the future, and what we can learn from cities in other countries. By the end of the course, students will understand what can be done to improve the quality of life for families in urban neighborhoods.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 331 Urban Ethnography (3 credits)

Though it is certainly useful to analyze cities with numbers and statistical analyses, one can perhaps best capture life within cities through ethnography. Ethnography allows the researcher to dig deep and analyze any number of social settings. Ethnography encompasses several different methods, but in this course we will concentrate on observation and writing field notes. Both sociologists and anthropologists use these methods in their research. In this course, you will not only learn to practice ethnography, but you will also read and critique several urban ethnographies.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 334 African-American Experience (3 credits)

SOC 335 Classes and Power in US (3 credits)

Examines the social, economic, and political inequalities in the United States; analyzes causes of social stratification; studies social mobility and the existence of a power elite.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 336 Sociology of Appalachia (3 credits)

This course is a survey of the social and economic life of the Appalachian region from the colonial period of American history to the present. The course examines changing patterns of culture, land use, economy, politics, and social structure in the mountains in an effort to understand the contemporary social system in Appalachia. Special emphasis will be placed upon the interaction of mountain residents with the broader forces of social change at work in America: changing family structures, gender roles, economic systems, political cultures, material life, and value orientations. Stereotyped images of Appalachia as an isolated, atypical land, unconnected to the rest of the American experience will be contrasted with a view of Appalachian history as shaped and affected by the same forces of political concentration, capitalist transformation, mass society, and the bureaucratic state that have created modern America.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 337 Forensic Financial Analysis (3 credits)

This course covers the detection of illegal financial transactions. Major topics include money laundering, fraud, embezzlement, and illicit accounting practices. Students will learn data gathering and analysis techniques for financial transactions, records, legitimate businesses, illegal organizations, and individuals. The course will include preparation for trial. Permission of the Instructor.

SOC 338 Police and the Community (3 credits)

This course will examine factors contributing to cooperation or friction between law enforcement personnel and the community. Emphasis will be placed on political, social and economic forces which influence this. Policies addressing this problem will be reviewed.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC 102 or SOC 202 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 340 The Ethical Consumer (3 credits)

The recent “ethical turn” in markets has led to a growing number of products that give proceeds to a charitable or altruistic cause. We see Pink Ribbons when we shop for a car, fair trade coffee at Wal-Mart, and product (RED) clothing at the GAP. Many of these products and brands are creating significant social change; others are “greenwashing” or “fairwashing” markets by making false promises. In this course we will read research from sociology, marketing, and psychology to understand the consumer behavior of individuals trying to change the world through shopping; we will examine the strengths and weaknesses of these “consumer-dependent” social movements; and we will examine the social forces that led “shopping for a cause” to become a modern means for creating social change. This course will conclude with an attempt to put our ideas into practice through group-projects designed to raise funds for local mission-driven businesses such as Cal’s Cupcakes, Alex’s Lemonade, or Fair Trade retailers.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: American Studies Course, Ethics Intensive (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 344 Populations (3 credits)

SOC 345 Law and Social Policy (3 credits)

An exploration of various dimensions of the relationship between law and social policy in contemporary U.S. society. In assessing how judicial opinions and legislative efforts affect social relations and institutional arrangements, inquiry is focused upon: (1) the ways in which social problems become defined as legal issues; (2) the forces which shape the initiation and ultimate formulation of legislative acts designed to affect public policy; (3) the role which cultural values and assumptions play in framing legal arguments and influencing judicial opinions and remedial programs; (4) the issue of compliance and the ways in which it is measured and enforced, and (5) the strengths and limitations of the law as a means of achieving specific social policy objectives.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 346 CJ Ethics & Legal Responsblty (3 credits)

This course focuses on major ethical and legal responsibility issues in the legal professions including conflicts of interest, confidentiality, competence, counseling, economic pressures, advocacy tactics, and professionalism, as well as the standards and rules which govern the legal professions, The course will be especially helpful to students who plan to enter law school upon graduation.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 348 Consumer Culture in Global Per (3 credits)

SOC 349 Poverty, Ethics & Soc.Policy (3 credits)

This course offers an overview of poverty in the United States, explores the ethical principles surrounding poverty and our response to it, and examines social policies that seek to ameliorate poverty. Students will work on a semester-long academic assignment which will engage them in one aspect of poverty and social policy.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 351 Gender and the Law (3 credits)

Utilizing a case law approach, this course examines historical and contemporary judicial responses to gender inequality. Among the topics covered are: affirmative action, no-fault divorce, criminal sentencing disparities, and the intersection of sex, race, and social class inequalities in the law. Satisfies Gender Studies Minor requirement.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and SOC 102 or SOC 150

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 353 Restorative Justice Practice (3 credits)

This course places restorative justice theory into practice. Students will learn and become proficient in several restorative practices including peacemaking circles, sentencing circles, restorative conferencing, reparative boards, youth aid panels and victim offender mediation. As an experiential course, students will participate in all of the practices throughout the semester. Some of these practices are hundreds of years old. Many criminal justice agencies see potential widespread application. The skills taught in this course can be used in any situation involving conflict.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 355 Race, Crime & CJ (3 credits)

This course examines the topic of race and ethnicity in relation to crime and criminal justice processing. More specifically, we focus on several issues: 1) the role of privilege and marginalization in the context of race and ethnicity and the criminal justice system: 2) the impact of these factors on intergroup relationships generally and the responses of the criminal justice system to criminal behavior, victimization, and employment within the criminal justice field; 3) how the responses of the criminal justice system affect the lives of offenders, victims, and agents of the criminal justice system for various racial/ethnic groups; 4) the current patterns of crime and victimization in relation to race/ethnicity? In addressing these questions, it is important to note that this is an upper-level sociology/criminal justice course, so do not expect it to be lecture driven, although some lectures will be presented. Much of the course work will revolve around class discussions and written analysis of the readings.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 356 Gender, Crime & CJ (3 credits)

An examination of the gendered nature of criminal victimization, offending, and criminal justice processing from a feminist sociological perspective. Students will read and critically evaluate in a seminar format feminist criminologists’ analyses of topics such as fear of crime, gangs, prostitution, corporate violence against women, policing, and corrections. Special emphasis will be given to the intersections of gender, racial/ethnic and social class inequalities.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 357 Vio & Reconciliation in N Ire (3 credits)

SOC 358 Consumr Cult & Globl Perspctve (3 credits)

In recent years there have been dramatic changes in the ways we consume: chain stores are proliferating, products are increasingly being produced in developing countries, consumers are taking on record levels of debt, fashion and tastes are evolving at a faster rate than ever before, and advertising expenditures are at historic highs. All of these changes are associated with what we have come to know as globalization. This course will examine how advances in technology, communication, and transportation systems all impact our everyday lives as consumers. We will utilize contemporary sociological theories of globalization to examine these societal changes. The class will conclude with an in-depth analysis of ethical consumption. Although this course is primarily sociological in orientation, we will also examine how marketers psychologists, and social critics write about global consumer culture.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

SOC 360 Sociology of Law (3 credits)

An analysis of contemporary theories of law; examines the statements of the main exponents of the consensus, pluralist, elitist, and dialectical models of law creation; focus also on the tie between the models and the social context in which they emerged and developed.

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 363 Phila: In Black and White (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to explore the topic of race relations with reference to a case study of Philadelphia. It is a unique course insofar as it directly addresses the issue of race in a multidisciplinary way, and it offers a unique opportunity to explore a topic and a city that are only dealt with indirectly in other courses. This course will explore the impact of race on social, economic, and political life in Philadelphia. Utilizing a socio-historical approach, it will focus on the work of W.E.B. DuBois and other social scientists who have documented the effects of race on Philadelphians in such diverse areas as housing, health care, employment, and family life.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 365 Crime & Urban Communities (3 credits)

From the beginning of the study of sociology in the United States, sociologists have studied life within a community context, documenting how space matters. The physical and social aspects of neighborhoods affect how likely crime is to occur in them and how residents can fight this crime. In addition to learning how space affects crime, we will learn key theories and concepts which sociologists use in studying urban crime, we will discuss current major issues in crime such as re-entry, and we will study crime-fighting strategies.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Undergraduate

SOC 368 Cults as Social Movements (3 credits)

This course looks at the social psychology and the social movement aspect of selected cults. Questions that the course examines: What is a cult? Who joins cults? Why do people stay in cults? What is daily life in a cult like? What should we as a society do about cults? How do we study cults?

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 369 Basic Crim Intelligence Analys (3 credits)

This course teaches the basic principles of Intelligence Analysis, as practiced by the CIA, FBI, DEA and other Federal, State and Local law enforcement agencies. The course covers deductive logic, development of inferences, hypothesis development and testing, sources of information, and analytical techniques e.g. matrix development and link analysis. Upon completion of this course you will be eligible to join the International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA).

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 370 Special Topics (3 credits)

SOC 375 Electronic Intelligence Analys (3 credits)

The course will use computer technology and analytical software tools (with emphasis on Analyst Notebook 6) to process and compare data. Analyst Notebook is the program currently being used by the CIA, FBI, NSA, US Army, INS, Customs, Secret Service, Homeland Security, DEA and1500 other National, State and Local Law Enforcement agencies throughout the world, to combat Terrorism, Drug Smuggling, Money Laundering and Organized Crime. This is a hands-on course where students will be learning to visualize complex relationships, analyze large data sets, and communicate findings to develop tactical and strategic intelligence.

Prerequisites: SOC 369

Attributes: Criminal Justice Course, Undergraduate

SOC 376 Practice of Citzensh and Untho (3 credits)

Fyodor Dostoevsky – who served time in Russia’s prisons in the 19th century – said, “The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.” We’ll be entering into one of Philadelphia’s prisons in this class, and throughout the semester we’ll consider this statement, using the prism of the Unthought surrounding Black American Culture. How has this Unthought shaped what citizenship looks like for Black Americans? This can be dissected in many ways, but one of our focuses for this class will be mass incarceration. This course will read contemporary Black writers confronting and navigating the Unthought surrounding Black American Culture. Unthought refers to ideas that exist without acknowledgement, speech or form, but which nevertheless come into being at the same moment that thoughts— well-formed and articulated ideas, do. Because, as Michel Foucault suggests, the Unthought is “a brother, a twin, born, not of man, or in man, but beside him and at the same time in an identical newness in an unavoidable duality,” (Foucault 1972, 326– 328) looking at what is not most obviously thought, and stated as such, can reveal insight into what is. Consider, for example, the clearly stated thoughts governing American citizenship. Now consider how those ideas seem to differ from the way American citizenship is lived and/or carried out. In this example, examining texts which attempt to uncover the Unthought of American citizenship can help to close the gaps between what we think, say, and do; more broadly, this will be the work of our class. We will read, discuss, and examine writers thinking through the Unthought we look overlook every day.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), Faith Justice Course, Service Learning Course

SOC 377 Inside-Out (3 credits)

This class offers a unique opportunity to have meaningful discussions about a range of topics from inside a correctional facility. Inside-Out classes bring together students from Saint Joseph’s University and adult students who are incarcerated to learn about and discuss topics such as the causes of crime, racism, literature, philosophy, and restorative justice. Through the readings and dialogue, inside and outside students will be able to integrate their theoretical knowledge with lived experiences. It is through this exchange that we hope to critically analyze and challenge the current system in the U.S. that has resulted in a higher incarceration rate than other similar countries.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Service Learning Course, Undergraduate

SOC 378 Urban and Public Policy (3 credits)

This course will offer a foundation in how sociologists study cities and public policy. We will examine assets of cities and key areas of need that cities face (such as education, poverty, housing, and crime), and we will study policy options to improve cities and their larger metropolitan areas. These are broad policy areas of study, so we will hone in on specific policies. For example, we will explore how cities have formulated their initiatives to end homelessness, we will consider juvenile justice alternatives, and we will look at how cities can position themselves to be sustainable in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Criminal Justice Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

SOC 379 Soc of Intn'l Law & Politics (3 credits)

SOC 386 Violence in Intimate Relations (3 credits)

Women and children have a higher probability of being seriously injured or killed by someone with whom they are intimately associated rather than by a stranger. This course will examine questions such as: What factors contribute to the prevalence of intimate violence in the U.S.? How does intimate violence differ across groups (e.g., by race/ethnicity, social class)? How are 456 various forms of intimate violence (i.e., partner abuse, child abuse, elder abuse) interrelated?

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 390 Special Topics (3 credits)

SOC 470 Special Topics (3 credits)

Course content determined by instructor. Past topics included: Women’s Rights, Extremist Movements, The Ethical Consumer.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Senior. Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Criminal Justice or Sociology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 490 Internship (3,6 credits)

The student is placed according to his/her interests in a criminal justice, social service, or health care setting for a semester. In this way, he/she may apply classroom-acquired skills and knowledge while gaining practical work experience. Permission of internship director required.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 491 Internship (3-12 credits)

The student is placed according to his/her interests in a criminal justice, social service, or health care setting for a semester. In this way, he/she may apply classroom-acquired skills and knowledge while gaining practical work experience. Permission of internship director required.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SOC 493 Independent Research in SOC (3 credits)

SOC 494 Independent Research Sociology (3 credits)

SOC 495 Seminar I (3 credits)

This course is where students complete the required senior thesis. An Honors section is available for those students completing College Honors.

Prerequisites: SOC 313 and ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

SOC 497 College Honors Indept Study (3 credits)

College Honors candidates in Sociology will complete a second honors course during the Spring of the senior year (SOC 497) which includes research, extending the senior capstone experience beyond what non-Honor students complete.