Art History (ARH)

ARH 101 Intro to Global Art History I (3 credits)

A survey of the visual arts and architecture from a global perspective. Students are introduced to a wide range of artistic practices, styles, and media from many major periods throughout history, and will examine the way visual culture both reflects and influences the ideas and values of the societies that produce it. The course covers material such as prehistoric cave painting; funerary art from ancient Egypt; temple architecture and sculpture dedicated to the gods and goddesses of ancient Greece and Rome; the development of Buddhist art and architecture in Asia; and the religious and secular art and architecture of medieval Europe.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 102 Intro to Global Art History II (3 credits)

A survey of the visual arts and architecture from a global perspective. This is a continuation of “Introduction to a Global Art History I,” but the two courses may be taken independently of one another. Students are introduced to a wide range of artistic practices, styles, and media, including painting, drawing, prints, photography, sculpture, installation art, performance art, film, video, and architecture, in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. The class examines many major periods and movements in the history of art, including material such as the Renaissance painting in Italy and northern Europe; ukiyo-e woodblock prints in Japan; power figures in Africa; Impressionism in nineteenth-century France and America; Cubism and, Abstract Expressionism in the early twentieth century; and contemporary art worldwide.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 103 Art and Architecture of Africa (3 credits)

This course will focus on the rich history of the art and architecture of Africa. It will take advantage of the strong collection of African art at Saint Joseph’s University, as well as other collections in the Philadelphia area.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ARH 104 The Experience of Architecture (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the history of architecture – its major figures, works, movements, and historical eras. It encourages students to analyze major buildings within a broader context and challenges them to reflect on the cultural and political implications of the built environment. Students will gain familiarity with the most significant architectural styles, structural approaches, building materials, and technological innovations that have shaped architecture throughout human history.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: American Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ARH 105 Art of East Asia (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the visual culture of East Asia from prehistory to the present, viewed through the lens of history, literature, and religion. Topics of particular focus will include ancestor worship in ancient China; the intersection of Buddhism with art and architecture; calligraphy as an art form; the illustration of The Tale of Genji and Heian court culture; class, gender, and ukiyo-e (woodblock prints); popular art such as manga and anime, and trends in contemporary Asian art of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We will also discuss the idea of cultural interaction and appropriation between China, Korea, Japan, and the West, as well as issues surrounding the collection and display of East Asian art in America. Students are given the opportunity to see relevant works of art in collections in the Philadelphia region.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Globalization Course (New GEP), Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ARH 106 Art of Colonial Latin America (3 credits)

This course examines the visual arts of Latin America beginning with the Spanish and Portuguese colonialization of the New World until the early nineteenth century when Independence was achieved. It encompasses the study of painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architecture from Mesoamerica, Central America, South America and the Caribbean. We also address issues critical to discussions of the arts of Latin America, such as preconceptions about the political and religious roles in art, appropriation and adaptation of western cultures, the incorporation and relationship with European/American art theory and methods, and the reevaluation of Latin American art today. Students are given the exciting opportunity to examine works of art from Saint Joseph’s University’s important collection of colonial Spanish American art as well as collections at nearby museums.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ARH 107 Women, Gender, and Art (3 credits)

This course offers a survey of art history with an emphasis on gender. It will consider how gender informs the production, reception, and cultural understanding of art and imagery. Students will consider how gender is relevant to the creation and study of arts and culture. We will study artists who have used art to effect social change. Exploring feminist approaches to art historical study, we will analyze perceptions of gender through visual culture and personal experience. We will examine the ways that certain ideals of masculinity and femininity are represented in art and its history to gain insight into gender performance and sexual identity both in past periods and in contemporary society.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 108 Traditions of Art (3 credits)

The course is designed to strengthen the participant’s understanding of the objective method or empirical art analysis as developed by Dr. Barnes, put into practice by Violette de Mazia and grounded in the aesthetic philosophy of John Dewey. Participants will deepen and enrich their understanding of art as it has developed through the centuries. Through direct study and observation, participants will be challenged both individually and collectively to participate in a continuing dialogue regarding the place of the aesthetic in everyday life and the role art can play within such a context. Participants are encouraged to think critically in this examination thereby affecting a richer and more meaningful experience for all. This will NOT count as fulfilling the GEP requirement, though it WILL count toward the Art History major or minor.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ARH 109 Elements of Art (3 credits)

Elements of Art is designed to help participants discover the art in painting through an objective method of understanding and appreciating visual expression, and to expose participants to an inclusive view of the relationship between art and daily life. In Elements of Art participants will hone their power of perception, develop a vocabulary by which to describe visual experiences, and begin to improve their ability to communicate to others what they see. Informed Perception is based on the analytical theory of Dr. Albert C. Barnes which was codified and explicated in the many writings and lectures of Violette de Mazia. Barnes' and de Mazia’s methodology is grounded in the pragmatic philosophy of John Dewey who remains one of the most respected names in American thought and philosophy and as such Dewey’s ideas will act as a springboard for many class discussions. In addition to the assigned readings participants are encouraged to read excerpts from Dewey’s seminal work Art as Experience available on the class portal. This will NOT count as fulfilling the GEP requirement, though it WILL count toward the Art History major or minor.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ARH 110 Art and Medicine (3 credits)

This course focuses on artists who explore and employ medicine in their work. Possible images for analysis include works by Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Eakins, and Hannah Wilke, as well as visual depictions of world health crises in the media. Students will look at how a broad range of artists has envisioned medicine, disease, and deviance, and their related dialogue with constructions of race, class, gender, and sexuality. The course will encourage students to think critically about the many intersections between art and medicine throughout history. It also will touch upon how medical professionals are increasingly receiving art history training and why. The chronological parameters of the course will vary according to who is teaching it.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 115 Italy Through Art (3 credits)

Italy Through Art, The Making of Modern Rome: Conducted in Rome, this course introduces students to the visual language of art, while providing an enriching cultural experience. The eternal city is an expansive, open-air museum where ancient and modern meet. Students will learn about Rome’s artistic heritage while living amidst ancient ruins, baroque basilicas and contemporary monuments. As we view art objects first-hand, we will explore the making and meaning of Italian art, by addressing methodological issues including form and function, style, materials and technique. We begin with a consideration of ancient Rome, through direct experience with monuments that have survived centuries. Next, we explore the early developments of Christianity by visiting Roman basilicas and churches. Our excursion to Tuscany focuses on Renaissance humanism and Medici patronage. Upon return to Rome we examine Baroque masterpieces adorning Roman piazzas and churches. We conclude with art and architecture of the period after 1870, when Rome became the capital of Italy. The course is complemented by guest lectures and site visits to Roman museums, churches and palaces, as well as excursions to Assisi, Florence, Pompeii and Sorrento. Taught in English. No pre-requisites. Counts toward the major and minor in art history, the Italian Studies major, the major and minor in Classical Studies, and the minor in Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation Studies.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Medieval, Ren & Reform Studies, Undergraduate

ARH 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

Students will focus on a topic having to do with the history of art and architecture. The class will include field trips on campus and in Philadelphia. Besides learning about artists and their works, students will hone their reading, writing, speaking and research skills, as they become acquainted with the university.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

ARH 178 Art History &Photography:Italy (3 credits)

This Art study tour will have a combined emphasis on the history of Italian Renaissance art and the practice of photography. Through travel to the Italian cities of Venice, Florence, and Rome students will have the opportunity to explore the great works of art and architecture that defined the Renaissance in Italy – St. Mark’s Square, the Uffizi, the Sistine Chapel and more. They will also spend time developing photographic skills as they explore these cities with an eye toward creating their own photo essay. Travel will be over Spring Break. No prior experience in either art history or photography is required.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ARH 180 Encountering Mystery (3 credits)

This course investigates the relationship between art, religious belief structures, and mystical experience. With a number of texts from Comparative Religion and Art Theory as backdrop, the lectures, discussions, and papers will involve presentations of art and architecture which circumscribe religious belief structures as well as expressions of spiritual conviction. Discussions of the essential elements of the I-am-spiritual-but-not-religious mindset will expose contrasting experiences of the mysterium tremendum et fascinans, the “numinous” wholly Other. Reflection on experience will lead to a stronger ability to express one’s own attitudes about the scientific mindset and the creative expression of spiritual ideas and ideals.

Prerequisites: PHL 154 and (THE 154 or THE 221)

Attributes: Faith-Reason Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 202 Medvl Art Ctcombs to Cthdrals (3 credits)

This course examines the art and architecture of the Middle Ages across a broad chronological and geographic scope, from the late Roman empire through the late Gothic period (c. 250-1500), including western Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic world. We will study the painting, sculpture, architecture, stained glass, metalwork, and manuscripts produced by the diverse cultures during this period in terms of materials and methods of production, style, and iconography. We will also pay special attention to the historical context for the creation and reception of medieval art, including issues of patronage, politics, gender, cross-cultural interactions, and the multivalent purposes of images and buildings during the Middle Ages.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Medieval, Ren & Reform Studies, Undergraduate

ARH 203 Renaissance Art & Architecture (3 credits)

This course analyzes key works of art and architecture and art historical trends from the period of the 13th to 16th century. The focus of our exploration is on the art of Europe, with a particular emphasis on Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. We discuss the careers and works of artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and Albrecht Dürer. We also explore the social and historical context of the art they produced, including issues of patronage, gender, and audience.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Medieval, Ren & Reform Studies, Undergraduate

ARH 204 Baroque Art and Architecture (3 credits)

This course analyzes key monuments and art historical trends from the late 16th century to the mid-18th century. The focus of our exploration is on the art of Europe, with a particular emphasis on Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. We discuss the careers and works of artists such as Caravaggio, Gianlorenzo Bernini, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Jan Vermeer, and also explore the social and historical context of the art they produced.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Medieval, Ren & Reform Studies, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ARH 205 Revolution to Realism1780-1880 (3 credits)

From the power of Neoclassicism to the decadence of the fin-de-siècle, painters, sculptors, and architects challenged tradition and transformed art during the dynamic and often turbulent years between 1780 and 1880. The death of the revolutionary hero, the search for spiritual meaning, the "rape" of the countryside by industrialism, the anxious masculinity of romanticism, and the emergence of such conceptions as "Orientalism" and nationalism are some of the themes that are addressed through the art of this period. Students study the careers of such artists as David, Delacroix, Ingres, Gericault, Constable, Turner, and Goya, and the radical landscape painting of the mid-century that foreshadowed Impressionism. Themes explored include gender and sexuality, patronage, and political censorship, and we focus on the social and political contexts in which works were produced, exhibited, and understood.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 206 Impressionism (3 credits)

This course examines paintings produced between the mid nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We consider artists from many countries who worked and exhibited in Paris at this time, including Monet, Renoir, Degas, and Cassatt. This course also includes discussion of artists who immediately followed the Impressionists, such as Manet, Seurat, Cézanne, Van Gogh and Gauguin. We consider the reception of these artists’ works by their contemporaries and since, and examine these works within their wider artistic, cultural, political, and social contexts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 207 American Art and Architecture (3 credits)

This course offers a survey of the history of American art and architecture. Organized around important episodes in American history, including the Civil War, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights Movement, this course considers such topics as the role of gender and racial identity in the content, authorship, and reception of artworks. The class examines major movements in the history of American art, with an emphasis on works that historically have been overlooked because of the race, gender, religion, nationality, and/or ethnicity of the artist or architect. In an effort to show the currency and relevance of these issues, and to scrutinize how art institutions treat (or ignore) issues of diversity, the course requires students to visit area museums and galleries.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 208 Modern Art & Architecture (3 credits)

This course offers a survey of the history of European and American art and architecture, with a focus on the first half of the 20th century. Students are introduced to a wide range of artistic practices, styles, and media, including painting, drawing, prints, photography, sculpture, film and architecture. The class examines major movements within the history of art, including such artists as Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Frida Kahlo, and Salvador Dalí. It takes advantage of the many rich collections of art and architecture in the Philadelphia area by visiting these institutions and analyzing works firsthand.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 209 Contemporary Art & Architect (3 credits)

The period from the mid-twentieth century to the present is one of exceptional political, social, cultural, and technological upheaval. This course offers a survey of European and American painting, drawing, prints, photography, sculpture, installation art, performance art, film, video, and architecture within the context of these changes. Topics covered include debates regarding abstraction and figuration, as well as feminism, primitivism, modernism, postmodernism, and the impact of such factors as technology, religion, and war on the creation and reception of art.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: American Studies Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ARH 210 Museum Studies (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to museum history, theory, and practice. Through case studies and key texts, it explores the evolving structure and mission of the museum and its impact on our understanding of art, society, and culture. Additionally, students will gain insight into the various jobs and responsibilities at museums. A key component of this course is immersive, on-site learning experiences that take advantage of the distinguished art institutions available in the Philadelphia region. Although centered on art museums, this course considers a broad range of museum practices and related fields.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Globalization Course (New GEP), Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ARH 211 Art & Magazines (3 credits)

Artists have been involved with magazines since they first appeared – designing covers, illustrating stories, designing pages, and even making their own. With an emphasis on the 19th through the 21st century, this course explores artists’ involvement in periodicals, including artists’ journals, contributions to mass circulation magazines, and underground “zines.” It explores how serials have helped artists disseminate their ideas, shaped their artistic beliefs, and informed what kind of images they made. It also considers why artists have accepted commissions from commercial periodicals like Fortune and The New Yorker. The course examines a wide range of artists, including not only photographers and “fine” artists, but also graphic designers and those hired as illustrators. It will delve into the material nature of magazines, from paper to digital, and analyze how magazines interrogate entrenched divisions between “high” and “low.” As part of the class, students will have the option to experiment with making their own magazines.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 212 History of Photography (3 credits)

Photography is a widely used but relatively little understood medium. This course offers a survey of photography in the United States and Europe from its invention to the present. We examines the ways in which photography has been employed by amateurs, artists, anthropologists, politicians, and scientists for a wide range of purposes. We also examine how the medium has affected portraiture, painting, documentation, journalism, and advertising. The class considers photography in the context of continuing debates regarding the nature of reality and truth, photography’s status as art or document, subjectivity versus objectivity, and issues of originality, authenticity, and power.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 301 Mystery&Monument:Anc Greece (3 credits)

This course examines the material culture remains of various cities prominent in the history of Greece. Knossos, the main city of the island of Crete, Troy, and Mycenae are among the sites studied for their importance in the Bronze Age (3000-1100 BCE). After a detailed study of Greek architecture and the evolution of key building types such as the temple, the stoa, and the theater, students explore the material remains of Olympia, Delphi, and Athens. The myths associated with these cities are also included.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ARH 302 Mystery&Monument:Anc Rome (3 credits)

An introduction to the art and archaeology of Roman Italy, which will explore through digital images the major surviving monuments of Rome and its environs, of the Etruscans, and of other famous sites in Italy.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 480 Art History Research Seminar (3 credits)

This course is designed to prepare seniors with a concentration in art history for graduate study and professional employment after graduation. It offers students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their art history and related courses to a project focused on a topic of their choosing. This topic will be the basis of an extensive research paper and a public presentation. Working closely with fellow classmates, the professor, and additional mentors, students will share and develop their ideas while honing their research, analytical, and writing skills. Outside readings will provide students with various methodologies to consider while pursuing their work. Students also will be exposed to various art history-related professions and offered guidance regarding the practical aspects of pursuing graduate school and professional employment.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ARH 481 Art History Internship (3 credits)

Students work 10 hours per week (total 130 hours), write a resume and sample cover letter, keep a journal, read a book relevant to their internship, and attend and write about an SJU Career Development Center event. Students who complete the requirements will receive 3 credits for one upper-division Art History course.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate