Honors (HON)

HON 150 Epic Tradition in Literature (3 credits)

This course will be organized around major thinkers whose works address perennial questions central to our Jesuit mission (the nature of Justice, questions of Faith, the Social contract, etc.). Each author considered will be presented within a rich historical context. Also, significant emphasis will be placed on Ancient and Medieval writers, in order to provide students a foundational introduction to the Western intellectual tradition that is taken up in subsequent team-taught interdisciplinary seminars. The Homeric epics, Plato’s Dialogues, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Virgil’s Aeneid, the Confessions of Augustine, Dante’s Divine Comedy – such works established the conceptual framework in which questions of justice, personal freedom, and moral obligation continue to be debated today. GEP First Year Seminar

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Honors Course, Undergraduate

HON 300 Community Engaged Scholarship (3 credits)

In this course, students will work with a community-based organization to design and conduct research on an issue related to homelessness or affordable housing. Throughout the semester, students will learn about research methods, research ethics, and the particular urban context within which they will be working. More importantly, students will gain experience working alongside staff of a community-based organization to solve problems or assess needs and strengths. This is a service-learning course, which fulfills both the GEP Social Science requirement and the diversity overlay.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Honors Course, Undergraduate

HON 301 Modern Mosaic I (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study in Western European civilization from 1832 to 1939, analyzing developments in history, philosophy, science, music, the arts and literature. Satisfies ENG 102 or the Art/Literature GEP requirement; GEP Writing Intensive; Honors team-taught.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 302 Modern Mosaic II (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study in Western European civilization from 1832 to 1939, analyzing developments in history, philosophy, science, music, the arts and literature. Satisfies ENG 102 or the Art/Literature GEP requirement; GEP Writing Intensive; Honors team-taught.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 303 Reason Revolution Reaction I (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study in Western European civilization from 1500 to 1832 analyzing developments in history, philosophy, science, music, the arts, and literature. Satisfies ENG 102 or the Art/Literature GEP requirement; GEP Writing Intensive; Honors team-taught.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate Day Division level students. Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GER Art/Literature, GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 304 Reason Revolution Reaction II (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study in Western European civilization from 1500 to 1832 analyzing developments in history, philosophy, science, music, the arts, and literature. Satisfies ENG 102 or the Art/Literature GEP requirement; GEP Writing Intensive; Honors team-taught.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate Day Division level students. Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GER Art/Literature, GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 305 America:Myth/Images/Real I (3 credits)

HON 306 America:Myth/Images/Real II (3 credits)

HON 307 Math Models in Chemistry I (3 credits)

HON 308 Math Models in Chemistry II (3 credits)

HON 309 Pens/Guns:Litr Road Am Civ War (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary study of the links between literature and politics leading up to and occurring during the American Civil War, with emphasis on the ways American writers used fiction, poetry, and other literary forms to react to and to comment publicly upon slavery and the sectional crisis that threatened the nation from the 1840s to the 1860s. Satisfies the Art/Literature GEP requirement; satisfies GEP Writing Intensive and Ethics Intensive; the upper-level requirement for history majors, the American literature requirement for English majors, and the elective requirement for American Studies minors; Honors Team-taught.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 310 Womens Writing as Emancipation (3 credits)

This course explores how British and American women of the late seventeenth to early twentieth centuries used writing as a means of emancipation. Drawing on a wide variety of women’s texts—narrative fictions, poetry, political polemics, conduct books, letters, autobiographies, social theories, sermons, etc.—we will examine both the historical circumstances in which women found themselves and the literary production that resulted. Satisfies Art/Literature GEP for all majors; Honors Team-taught. GEP Writing intensive and Diversity.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 311 Paradoxes, Prob & Proofs (3 credits)

Can a sentence be both true and false at the same time? Can a theorem be true if it has no proof? Can there be different sizes of infinity? Can a single solid ball be decomposed and reassembled to create two balls each with the same volume as the original? These questions all lie at the juncture of philosophy and the foundations of mathematics. This course examines the questions that have emerged in the 20th century about the nature of mathematical truth and the status of our mathematical knowledge. This is a genuinely interdisciplinary course that considers questions from both mathematical and philosophical perspectives. Satisfies Mathematics GEP; Honors Team-taught.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Honors Course, Math Beauty (New GEP)

HON 312 Word Became Flesh: Cath Spirit (3 credits)

HON 315 An Understanding of Suffering (3 credits)

The template through which this class will be offered is the Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual model. In so many words such a model is designed to help one arrive at an “Ecology of the Spirit” whereby one is led to respond to the question, What are the conditions through which a person is more open to be alert to the movements and workings of God’s Spirit (whatever one’s belief)? In effect, this “Ecology of the Spirit” may serve as a useful way of conceptualizing theologically suffering, trauma and evil, that is to say, a theodicy. This particular class is designed to accentuate the philosophical, psychological and theological meanings surrounding suffering and trauma.Using the faith and reason principle of gratia perfecta natura (grace perfects nature), I will suggest how God comes to a person in and through suffering, even in trauma. Various religious understandings of suffering and trauma will be offered with special emphasis given to the Catholic tradition. Through an appropriation of these understandings, the student will learn to become even more skilled in encountering suffering, one’s own and that of others, and be a source and a resource for healing and hope. In this respect the student will become a competent and compassionate man/woman for others.

Prerequisites: PHL 154 and (THE 154 or THE 221) and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 318 Society, Democracy, Republic (3 credits)

This Honors team-taught course will focus on the intellectual heritage of thinking and writing about collective human life, with particular reference to governance, decision-making, mores, social codes and conventional relationships of power (including both explicit power-sharing arrangements and customary divergences in status, authority, autonomy or control for various classes of persons). Despite an avowed focus on governance and the exercise of power, the course is devoted neither to the history of governments nor to political analysis. It will, instead, deal with principles, ethical frameworks and broadly humanistic values that we will illuminate through a large and varied sample of readings from the Ancient World and from the modern West. The intellectual content of the course will be rooted in social commentary and in literary and philosophical texts. Ethical considerations lie at its core. Prerequisite: PHL 154 Moral Foundations. Fulfills the following GEP requirements: Honors team-taught; Ethics-Intensive Overlay; Fine Art/Literature

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate

HON 320 Honors:Elections of 2012 (3 credits)

This course coincides with the Federal Election cycle, and provides an analysis of the presidential, congressional, and gubernatorial races. Student will develop a basis for understanding the election cycle, especially drawing upon the changes that have taken place in American politics since the 1980s and the history of electioneering in America, especially in the modern era. This will include discussion of partisan realignment, the growing importance of personality and interest group politics, and the role of issues in influencing electoral choice. Particular attention will be devoted to understanding the tactics and strategies of the two major parties as they position themselves and then engage in the campaign process.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Honors Course, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

HON 366 Violence and Non Violence (3 credits)

HON 384 Jew/Chr: Theologies Compared (3 credits)

HON 390 Decending Tower: Commnty Rsrch (3 credits)

Engaged scholarship can take several forms. Broadly defined, it means connecting the rich resources of the university to our most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems. One key way of sharing these resources is through research--not “on” the community, but “with” the community. This type of research model is one in which projects are developed collaboratively by community organization staff, faculty, and students, building on the unique strengths of those involved. In this course, students will work with a community-based organizations to design and conduct research. Throughout the semester, students will learn about research methods and ethics, and the particular urban context in which they will be working. More importantly, students will gain experience working alongside staff of a community-based organization to solve problems or assess needs and strengths.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.