Art

Department Overview

The Art Department’s award-winning faculty, all professional artists or scholars, have exhibited their work in prestigious galleries and published their writings around the globe. Our professors are also dedicated teachers who challenge and inspire students to develop their own self-expression and personal aesthetic.

We offer courses in painting, drawing, traditional photography, digital photography, sculpture, found object art, pottery, ceramics, mosaics, and art history. We have two large studios dedicated exclusively to painting and drawing, another two studios for sculpture and related courses, a ceramics/pottery area with its own kiln house, a darkroom for traditional photography, and a digital photography lab with 30 high-end computers and state-of-the-art software.

Department Mission

Through practice, study and research in a variety of disciplines, the Art Department fosters an appreciation of the transformative nature of art both personally and culturally. Studio and lecture courses in the visual arts and art history integrate intellectually informed, hands-on instruction with elements of creative freedom, independent thought and critical insight.

Providing strong faculty mentorship in both traditional and contemporary methods, the Department encourages individuality and ingenuity in every student. The broadly based curriculum and the rigor of concentration in a specific discipline equips students with the knowledge and skills necessary to flourish beyond the undergraduate experience.

Art Department Environment

The Art Department is the home of the University Gallery in Merion Hall, and the Boland Hall Gallery. The University Gallery mounts six professional exhibitions and one student exhibition each year. The year-end exhibition in the University Gallery is the result of the seniors’ capstone experience, displaying the work of graduating studio art majors. The first exhibition in the Boland Hall Gallery each fall showcases the work of a recent graduate. The Boland Hall Gallery also exhibits student works from the different concentrations, curated by the faculty in those disciplines on an ongoing basis. The final exhibit in the Boland Hall Gallery is the junior majors invitational exhibit.

Art in the GEP

All Majors

The "Art, Music/Theater/Film, or Literature" GEP requirement for all majors may be satisfied by any three-credit ART course (Art History or studio course) not requiring a pre-requisite. 

Independent Study Program

Independent study courses may be taken for upper division credit in a student’s major department. Advanced or specialized work in Art may be pursued under the guidance of a faculty mentor within the independent study program. Students requesting an independent study should contact the faculty member to be involved in the project at least two weeks prior to the registration period. Students must submit a written project proposal which outlines topics and goals.

College Honors Requirements

To receive College Honors credit, Art majors participate in the Senior Project courses, required of all majors, and complete additional assigned reading, research and discussion that are not required of those students not taking the courses for honors credit. For students in the University Honors program, these two upgraded courses may be counted toward the eight course Honors requirement. To be eligible to participate in College Honors, a student must have a 3.5 GPA. Students interested in completing the College Honors project during their senior year should contact the department chair early in the spring semester of their junior year. More details concerning College Honors may be found in the "Honors Program" section of the catalog. 

Art History Courses

All Art History courses are open to all majors with no prerequisites. Students need not take 100-level courses before 200-level courses. All courses fulfill the "Art, Music/Theater/Film, or Literature" requirement.

Students wishing to concentrate in Art History should work closely with their advisors to ensure that their chosen courses cover a wide range of art historical areas (i.e. Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern).

Professor: Bruce Wells, Ph.D.; Dennis McNally, S.J., Ph.D.
Associate: Emily Hage, Ph.D.; Susan Fenton, M.F.A.
Assistant: Jury Smith, M.F.A.; Steve Cope, M.F.A.

Chair: Wells

Undergraduate Majors

Undergraduate Minors

All Art History courses are open to all majors with no prerequisites. Students need not take 100-level courses before 200-level courses. All courses fulfill the Art/Lit requirement.

Students wishing to concentrate in Art History should work closely with their advisors to ensure that their chosen courses cover a wide range of art historical areas (i.e. Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern).

ART 101 Intro to Art History I (3 credits)

A survey of the visual arts and architecture from Pre-Historic times to the Renaissance. Students are introduced to a wide range of artistic practices, styles, and media from many major periods and styles throughout history including pre-historic, Roman, Byzantine, medieval and Gothic.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 102 Art History Survey II (3 credits)

A survey of the visual arts and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. Students are introduced to a wide range of artistic practices, styles, and media, including painting, drawing, prints, photography, sculpture, installation art, performance art, film, video, and architecture. The class l examines many major periods and movements in the history of art, including the Italian Renaissance, Impressionism, Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, and the multiple artistic currents that characterize art being created today.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 103 Non Western Art & Architecture (3 credits)

This course moves beyond North America and Europe to offer a global view of the visual arts and architecture. From the Great Pyramids and the Taj Mahal to Ukiyo-e woodcuts, Frida Kahlo’s paintings, and the myriad works by African artists today, such works offer insight into the range and complexity of today’s increasingly globalized climate. For each semester in which it is offered, this course focuses on art from a specific country or region outside of North America and Western Europe, including those found in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America. It takes advantage of the many rich collections of art and architecture in the Philadelphia area by visiting these institutions and analyzing works firsthand.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ART 104 The Experience of Architecture (3 credits)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the medium of architecture as environmental artwork capable of both reflecting a society’s self-image, and directly influencing that image. Works from the Prehistoric through the present periods are included in the scope of this course. The class format includes lectures, discussions, slide presentations, and visits to art historically exemplary buildings in this area and reflectively comparative papers on two buildings per week.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ART 105 Arts of East Asia (3 credits)

This course introduces students to East Asian art and architecture and to East Asian history and culture in general. Lectures and discussions address major movements in the visual culture of East Asia, including architecture, painting and sculpture. Readings cover both art historical works and primary source material in translation. Themes include religious art, particularly the introduction of Buddhist to East Asia from India, cultural interchange within East Asia, and the collection and display of East Asian art in America. Students are given the opportunity to see relevant works of art in collections in the Philadelphia region.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Globalization Course (New GEP), Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ART 106 Art of Colonial Latin America (3 credits)

This course examines the visual arts of Latin America beginning with the Spanish and Portuguese colonialization of the New World until the early nineteenth century when Independence was achieved. It encompasses the study of painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architecture from Mesoamerica, Central America, South America and the Caribbean. We also address issues critical to discussions of the arts of Latin America, such as preconceptions about the political and religious roles in art, appropriation and adaptation of western cultures, the incorporation and relationship with European/American art theory and methods, and the reevaluation of Latin American art today. Students are given the exciting opportunity to examine works of art from Saint Joseph’s University’s important collection of colonial Spanish American art as well as collections at nearby museums.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Non-Western Studies (GEP)

ART 107 Women, Gender, and Art (3 credits)

This course offers a survey of art history with an emphasis on gender. It will consider how gender informs the production, reception, and cultural understanding of art and imagery. Students will consider how gender is relevant to the creation and study of arts and culture. We will study artists who have used art to effect social change. Exploring feminist approaches to art historical study, we will analyze perceptions of gender through visual culture and personal experience. We will examine the ways that certain ideals of masculinity and femininity are represented in art and its history to gain insight into gender performance and sexual identity both in past periods and in contemporary society.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 121 Introduction to Studio Art (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the essential elements of painting, drawing and sculpture. Working from the landscape, still life and the figure, students research two-dimensional form and space through a variety of mediums that includes: charcoal, pencil and paint. The investigation of three-dimensional issues is done with clay. Fulfills GEP Art, Music/Theater/Film, or Literature requirement.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 133 Drawing I (3 credits)

Students work from their actual visual experience. Working from the landscape, still life and the figure, students research form and space through tone, size relationships, mark-making and composing the picture plane. Ultimately we try to integrate these elements producing a unified whole as well as finding an equivalent to the artists’ experience. Media range from small pencil drawings to larger more ambitious charcoal drawings.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 135 Painting I (3 credits)

This course concentrates on becoming familiar and proficient with the basics of image-making through painting, developing good studio practice, introducing terminology, developing language and examining the work of established professional painters, so that constructive discussions and self-analysis may take place. The subject is studio-based, and the course focuses on working from life (meaning that students work from their actual visual experience) or on learning from the attempt to express an interior reality. Working from various motifs as appropriate, including the landscape, still life and the figure, students research form and space using paint.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 136 Landscape Painting (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the essential elements of painting. We research these elements through the unique challenges that arise from notating the landscape, which include: overlapping forms, color temperature, the vastness of an outdoor space, scale relationships and atmospheric perspective. Ultimately we try to integrate these elements producing a unified whole as well as finding an equivalent to the artists’ experience.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 137 Printmaking (3 credits)

In this class we explore the processes of printmaking, resulting in as many as five projects all of which are realized in numbered editions. The areas covered include: reversing the image, direct cutting, color registration, and developing a substantial image from working drawings. The class includes slide presentations and critical discussions of student works.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature

ART 138 Landscape Drawing (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the essential elements of drawing from the landscape. We research form and space while working from the landscape. Some of the issues include: overlapping forms, the vastness of an outdoor space, scale relationships and atmospheric perspective. Ultimately we try to integrate these elements producing a unified whole as well as finding an equivalent to the artists’ experience.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 141 3-D Studio Art (3 credits)

This introductory course explores ideas and techniques for thinking critically and working three-dimensionally. Visual language and understanding of form is taught through the use of simple materials such as wood and wire to construct projects. The students discuss the variety of problem-solving issues connected to making sculpture. Three-dimensional theory, language, expression, and practical applications are emphasized along with the use of basic tools.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 142 Pottery I (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the potter’s wheel. The primary focus is functional pottery with a minor emphasis on building and modeling by hand. Topics include basic handbuilding techniques, basic to intermediate throwing techniques, ceramic surfacing and firing methods, and concept development. In this course, students explore a variety of functional pottery forms including cups, bowls, vases and pitchers. Classes consist of technical demonstrations, lectures, practice time, and critiques.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 143 Mosaics I (3 credits)

This course focuses on the relationship between image and object through an exploration of ceramic tile and mosaics. Found adorning the most sacred of spaces and often performing the most mundane of functions, ceramic tile is a form of artistic inquiry that explores the intersection of art and utility. Topics include visual perception and language; basic painting and drawing methods; non-objective, abstract and representational imagery; and the construction, firing, and glazing of ceramic tile and mosaics.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 144 Ceramics I (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to building and modeling clay vessels and sculptures by hand with a minor emphasis on the potter’s wheel. Topics covered include basic to intermediate handbuilding techniques, basic throwing techniques, ceramic surfacing and firing methods, and concept development. Classes consist of technical demonstrations, lectures, practice time, and critiques. In this course, students explore a variety of functional and sculptural forms.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 145 Figurative Sculpture (3 credits)

This introductory course explores ideas and techniques for sculpting the figure from life. Traditional figurative sculpting is taught through study of anatomical proportion, muscular structure, and clay modeling. The history of contemporary figurative sculpture will be explored through lectures, power point presentation, videos, and student research. This class culminates in a project based on contemporary figurative processes.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 147 Intro to Found Object Art (3 credits)

Making art from everyday objects is regarded as a form of sculptural expression. This class will focus on both the historical and contemporary styles of Found Object art-making. Students are required to both find/purchase objects and reconfigure them into sculptures. Common venues for acquiring objects are explored. These include flea markets, thrift stores, recycling centers, garage sales, and one's own basements/attics. Once acquired we explore the various methods of reconfiguration into objects of art.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 150 Blasphemy & Devotion (3 credits)

Modern and contemporary artists and architects have engaged the many intersections between art and religions, and unprecedented globalization has helped spur dialogs among a wide range of creeds and has called attention to artists’ (sometimes controversial) visual responses to religion worldwide. This course also considers debates raised in recent exhibitions and scholarly texts. Artists studied include VanGogh, Warhol and Kahlo. Although some emphasis is placed on the relationship between art and Catholicism, students also analyze creative responses to many faiths, including other forms of Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

ART 157 Music History I (3 credits)

ART 170 Spec. Topics & Ind. Study (FR) (3 credits)

Concentrated focus on a selected topic in Art at an introductory level. GEP certifications vary by section.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 171 Color Composition (3 credits)

A hands-on photography course aimed at the student who wants to develop the perceptual, creative and technical skills needed to use a camera effectively, with color film. Presentations of color photographs, class discussions and student critiques of their own work deal with elements of photographic composition, focus, and light. Student work is done in the medium of color slides.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 172 Traditional Photography (3 credits)

This course investigates film-based black and white photography as an expressive and creative medium. Topics include the skills of using a 35mm camera effectively, film processing, basic darkroom printing techniques, and an understanding of the aesthetics of photography. Adjustable 35mm cameras will be provided to any students who need them.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 173 Digital Photography I (3 credits)

This course teaches the fundamental principles of photography using digital materials and equipment. Students will use digital cameras, computers, and scanners as tools for image manipulation and creative expression through the latest version of Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom. Topics will include basic photographic elements of exposure, camera controls, focus, lighting, tone, and a brief introduction to color. A limited number of digital cameras are available to students who need them.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 174 Alt. Photographic Processes (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the photographic image as it relates to the fine art and contemporary commercial worlds, and the creative possibilities that result from the combination of historic printing methods with contemporary media. Students will learn a variety of alternative processes that can produce or appropriate “photographic” images without the use of a camera. Experimentation with “non-silver” techniques such as solar printing (sun prints), hand-applied emulsions, and computer-generated negatives will allow students to explore their own artistic approach to a photographic printmaking process that does not require extensive technical expertise.

ART 178 Art History &Photography:Italy (3 credits)

This Art study tour will have a combined emphasis on the history of Italian Renaissance art and the practice of photography. Through travel to the Italian cities of Venice, Florence, and Rome students will have the opportunity to explore the great works of art and architecture that defined the Renaissance in Italy – St. Mark’s Square, the Uffizi, the Sistine Chapel and more. They will also spend time developing photographic skills as they explore these cities with an eye toward creating their own photo essay. Travel will be over Spring Break. No prior experience in either art history or photography is required.

ART 180 Encountering Mystery (3 credits)

This course investigates the relationship between art, religious belief structures, and mystical experience. With a number of texts from Comparative Religion and Art Theory as backdrop, the lectures, discussions, and papers will involve presentations of art and architecture which circumscribe religious belief structures as well as expressions of spiritual conviction. Discussions of the essential elements of the I-am-spiritual-but-not-religious mindset will expose contrasting experiences of the mysterium tremendum et fascinans, the “numinous” wholly Other. Reflection on experience will lead to a stronger ability to express one’s own attitudes about the scientific mindset and the creative expression of spiritual ideas and ideals.

Prerequisites: PHL 154 and (THE 154 or THE 221)

Attributes: Faith-Reason Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 202 Late Antique and Medieval Art (3 credits)

This course examines human cultural production between the years 250 and 1300. Beginning in the last centuries of the Roman Empire, and continuing through the luminous art of the "dark ages," the topics of study conclude with the towering monuments of the French Gothic style. Particular attention is given to works of architecture and engineering, and class discussion explores themes of social as well as political history.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 203 Renaissance Art (3 credits)

This course analyzes key works of art and architecture and art historical trends from the period of the 14th to 17th century. The focus of our exploration is on the art of Europe, with a particular emphasis on Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. We discuss the careers and works of artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and Albrecht Dürer. We also explore the social and historical context of the art they produced. Attention is paid to a variety of art forms, including painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 204 Baroque Art and Architecture (3 credits)

This course analyzes key monuments and art historical trends from the late 16th century to the mid-18th century. The focus of our exploration is on the art of Europe, with a particular emphasis on Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. We discuss the careers and works of artists such as Caravaggio, Gianlorenzo Bernini, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Jan Vermeer, and also explore the social and historical context of the art they produced. Attention is paid to a variety of art forms, including painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ART 205 NeoClassic-Impression1780-1880 (3 credits)

From the power of Neoclassicism to the decadence of the fin-de-siècle, painters, sculptors, and architects challenged tradition and transformed art during the dynamic and often turbulent years between 1780 and 1880. The death of the revolutionary hero, the search for spiritual meaning, the "rape" of the countryside by industrialism, the anxious masculinity of romanticism, and the emergence of such conceptions as "Orientalism" and nationalism are some of the themes that are addressed through the art of this period. Students study the careers of such artists as David, Delacroix, Ingres, Gericault, Constable, Turner, and Goya, and the radical landscape painting of the mid-century that foreshadowed Impressionism. Themes explored include gender and sexuality, patronage, and political censorship, and we focus on the social and political contexts in which works were produced, exhibited, and understood.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 206 Impressionism (3 credits)

This course examines paintings produced between the mid nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We consider artists from many countries who worked and exhibited in Paris at this time, including Monet, Renoir, Degas, and Cassatt. This course also includes discussion of artists who immediately followed the Impressionists, such as Manet, Seurat, Cézanne, Van Gogh and Gauguin. We consider the reception of these artists’ works by their contemporaries and since, and examine these works within their wider artistic, cultural, political, and social contexts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 207 American Art and Architecture (3 credits)

This course offers a survey of the history of American art and architecture. Organized around important episodes in American history, including the Civil War, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights Movement, this course considers such topics as the role of gender and racial identity in the content, authorship, and reception of artworks. The class examines major movements in the history of American art, with an emphasis on works that historically have been overlooked because of the race, gender, religion, nationality, and/or ethnicity of the artist or architect. In an effort to show the currency and relevance of these issues, and to scrutinize how art institutions treat (or ignore) issues of diversity, the course requires students to visit area museums and galleries.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 208 Modern Art & Architecture (3 credits)

This course offers a survey of the history of European and American art and architecture, with a focus on the first half of the 20th century. Students are introduced to a wide range of artistic practices, styles, and media, including painting, drawing, prints, photography, sculpture, film and architecture. The class examines major movements within the history of art, including such artists as Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Frida Kahlo, and Salvador Dalí. It takes advantage of the many rich collections of art and architecture in the Philadelphia area by visiting these institutions and analyzing works firsthand.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 209 Contemporary Art (3 credits)

The period from the mid-twentieth century to the present is one of exceptional political, social, cultural, and technological upheaval. This course offers a survey of European and American painting, drawing, prints, photography, sculpture, installation art, performance art, film, video, and architecture within the context of these changes. Topics covered include debates regarding abstraction and figuration, as well as feminism, primitivism, modernism, postmodernism, and the impact of such factors as technology, religion, and war on the creation and reception of art.

Attributes: American Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ART 210 Museum Studies (3 credits)

This course explores the history of museums and debates about the nature of collecting and modes of display. Using historical and theoretical texts as well as select case studies, it focuses on the evolving structure and mission of the museum and its impact on our understanding of art and related fields. In addition to the study of the history of exhibitions and the role of the museum, the course investigates the various jobs and responsibilities that people hold within museums. Guest speakers include members of the curatorial, publications, registration, education, and installation staff at various area museums. We take advantage of the distinct art institutions in Philadelphia, exploring their exhibitions and permanent collection displays. Although centered on art museums, this course also considers a broad range of museum practices.

Attributes: American Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 212 History of Photography (3 credits)

Photography is a widely used but relatively little understood medium. This course offers a survey of photography in the United States and Europe from its invention to the present. We examines the ways in which photography has been employed by amateurs, artists, anthropologists, politicians, and scientists for a wide range of purposes. We also examine how the medium has affected portraiture, painting, documentation, journalism, and advertising. The class considers photography in the context of continuing debates regarding the nature of reality and truth, photography’s status as art or document, subjectivity versus objectivity, and issues of originality, authenticity, and power.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 221 Art Education in the Schools (4 credits)

Qualified students are invited to take part in a supervised practicum, teaching at a local grammar school. In this course there are seminar discussions in methods of teaching, levels of mark making, learning styles, art historical references for the learning lessons being taught this week in the school in an eight-week intensive experience of teaching a group of fifteen to thirty primary school students. While this is being done, the student keep a weekly diary from which they construct a ten-page term paper on the meaning of the experience. This is a service learning course. This course may count as a GEP course if taken in conjunction with an introductory studio course (studio, drawing, painting, 3D, ceramics, traditional or digital photography).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Art Education or Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 233 Drawing II (3 credits)

Our purpose is to explore both formally and conceptually the elements of drawing in order to realize an authentic vision. Through directed exercises students discover new possibilities in the essential experience of drawing. These exercises cover the formal issues including surface and spatial geometry, the relationship between tone or scale to spatial depth, the mark as a means to personal expression and the integration of pictorial elements into a unified whole. In order to create new possibilities, students experiment with developing images and explore how and why images become interesting. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: ART 1311 (may be taken concurrently) or ART 1331 (may be taken concurrently) or ART 121 (may be taken concurrently) or ART 133 (may be taken concurrently)

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 235 Painting II (3 credits)

Through lectures, critical discussions course work and examination of the work of established professional painters, students will study content and material issues pertinent to producing compelling artworks. Finding one’s own voice as well as an authentic application of the media are primary objectives. Formal concerns such as dynamic composition and rigorous construction of form and space will be stressed. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: ART 135

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 239 Concepts and Artmaking (3 credits)

Artists have always made work based on concepts; ideas upon which the image or process is based. For example, the Impressionists in the second half of the 19th century made work based on concepts relevant to the time, choosing to paint common, every day subjects in plain air. Those concepts affected the processes, materials, and subjects of their work. In this course we explore how contemporary artists develop the concepts underpinning their work as well as develop our own conceptual thought concerning art-making. The focus each week is on making our own work. In this regard we will be paying particular attention to the ideas that are motivating us to make the image in the first place, clarifying them by considering some of the factors that influence our ideas and consequently refining the process by which we pursue the development and actualization of those ideas. We will augment our own ideas by researching the concepts of a number of contemporary artists. There are restrictions concerning the materials or medium, except those restrictions that we choose to place on ourselves as a result of the deepening understanding of our concepts and processes. The process of developing your own ideas in art is invaluable if you want to make art in the future; and if not, may simply alter your understanding of the next step you are going to take in your life, helping you to clarify your wants and desires. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: ART 121 or ART 133 or ART 135 or ART 141 or ART 142 or ART 143 or ART 144 or ART 172 or ART 173

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 241 Sculpture II (3 credits)

Building on skills acquired in ART 141, this course covers the use of repetition to achieve scale, the relationship between interior and exterior spaces, and the critical analysis associated with these techniques. Projects are executed in simple materials such as wood. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 242 Pottery II (3 credits)

This course covers intermediate wheel-throwing techniques to create complex functional forms, such as teapots, lidded jars, forms within forms, and large vessels. Emphasis is given to the ergonomics of each vessel. Topics also include function as an abstract attribute of material expression and the role of handmade pottery from a historical and contemporary viewpoint. Classes consist of technical demonstrations, lectures, practice time, and critiques. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 243 Mosaics II (3 credits)

This course covers a broad range of ceramic surfacing techniques, from traditional to alternative processes, and explores the relationship among surface, content, form, and function. Topics include surface undulation, surface depth, texture, sheen, color, and value. Students are encouraged to explore the experimental use of materials and to develop a personal approach to glaze and surface. Projects include functional and sculptural work, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional, and emphasize the dialogue between surface and form. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: ART 143 or ART 142 or ART 144

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 244 Ceramics II (3 credits)

This course explores the techniques and concepts involved in creating complex hand-built and wheel-thrown vessels and sculptures. Assignments are concept-driven and encourage creative inquiry and independent thought. The emphasis is not only the refinement of skill but the importance of content. Topics include sculptural approaches to clay, the wheel as an idea generating tool, alternative surfacing methods, and other research-driven investigations. Classes consist of technical demonstrations, lectures, practice time, and critiques. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: ART 142 or ART 143 or ART 144

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 245 Atmospheric Firing: Wood/Salt (3 credits)

This course explores the effects of wood, salt, and raku firing on pottery and sculpture. Firings include high-fire, midrange, and low-fire. To create a type of visual poetry, the projects in this course focus on the distinct attributes of each firing: fuel source, timing, weather, loading method, and flame path. Topics include the impact of heat movement, atmosphere, and temperature on aesthetics and functionality. Some off-campus events are required, including firing a Japanese style noborigama kiln. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 246 Ceramic Sculpture (3 credits)

Students explore the development of ceramic sculpture from its earliest beginnings to contemporary work being done. A variety of techniques to both construct and glaze ceramics are studied. Students will be expected to produce a body of sculptural work that explores both personal ideas and historical techniques. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 247 Appropriated Art (3 credits)

Making art from everyday objects is regarded as a form of sculptural expression. This class focuses on both the historical and contemporary styles of Found Object art-making. We develop the skills acquired in ART 147 or ART 141. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 248 Figurative Sculpture II (3 credits)

This class consists of research, discussion, and practice on contemporary figurative and body art issues. Projects throughout the semester explore different sculptural working methods, processes, and techniques including armature, traditional materials, molding/casting, and form building. Outcome of student work is focused on understanding of human gesture and individual expression.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ART 266 Women in Modern Theatre (3 credits)

ART 270 Spec. Topics & Ind. Study (SO) (3 credits)

Concentrated focus on a selected topic in Art History. Topic and content vary from semester to semester. Course may be taken twice for credit as the topic changes.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 272 Traditional Photography II (3 credits)

This course provides a continuation or review of film-based camera and darkroom techniques while introducing more advanced and experimental development. Topics include archival printing, advanced exposure controls, experimental camera work, and darkroom print manipulation. Slide presentations of master photographers will illustrate the flexibility of the medium and enable students to develop visual analysis, as well as their own creative expression. Adjustable 35mm film cameras will be provided to any student who needs one. May be taken as an independent study with the instructor’s permission during years when it is not regularly scheduled.

Prerequisites: ART 172

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 273 Digital Photography II (3 credits)

This second level digital photography course explores a broad range of topics in the creative use of digital photography. Using Photoshop software, students will develop a high level of personal control of their images. Topics include lighting, perception and use of color, digital toning and “hand coloring,” combining multiple layers, creative masking, combining text and images, image web design, digital “silkscreen” techniques, scanning, and digital fine printing. A limited number of digital cameras are available to students who need them.

Prerequisites: ART 275 or ART 173

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 275 Color Photography (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive introduction to digital color photography. Students learn how light influences color, how colors interact within an image, and how color influences meaning and emotional impact. Topics will include camera work and an understanding of light, digital processing, and printing with an emphasis on color theory and the history of fine art color photography.

Prerequisites: ART 172 or ART 173

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 301 Art and Archeaology: Greece (3 credits)

This course examines the material culture remains of various cities prominent in the history of Greece. Knossos, the main city of the island of Crete, Troy, and Mycenae are among the sites studied for their importance in the Bronze Age (3000-1100 BCE). After a detailed study of Greek architecture and the evolution of key building types such as the temple, the stoa, and the theater, students explore the material remains of Olympia, Delphi, and Athens. The myths associated with these cities are also included.

ART 302 Art and Archaeology: Italy (3 credits)

An introduction to the art and archaeology of Roman Italy, which will explore through digital images the major surviving monuments of Rome and its environs, of the Etruscans, and of other famous sites in Italy.

ART 331 Works on Paper (3 credits)

In this course, students address more sophisticated problems in black and white composition, using graphite, charcoal, and ink. They then are introduced to color media appropriate for paper, pastel and aquarelle, investigate the interaction of drawing and photography, and experiment with collage techniques. The course presupposes that drawing is a significant medium in itself and that works on paper are not mere way-stations to other "heavier" media, such as painting or sculpture. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 333 Drawing III (3 credits)

Drawing III is an intensive and rigorous study of drawing where students produce an enormous amount of work. The issues we investigate include: organizing your visual experience into a clear pictorial idea, recognizing and articulating the structure of a work, the relationships in tone and the uses of scale as an element. This course is directed to be a more personal exploration of drawing and images. Students will be encouraged to produce a series of related images. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Prerequisites: ART 233

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 335 Painting III (3 credits)

This course concentrates on realizing convincing form, rigorous construction of the entire picture plane and the pursuit of finding an authentic vision. There is a focus on the scale of the paintings and tone relationships. We research what personal narrative is and how it could impact the image. The students produce paintings in a range of sizes including some very large works. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 341 Sculpture III (3 credits)

Advanced skills in three-dimensional concepts and techniques. This course may be taken as an independent study.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 344 Ceramics III (3 credits)

More complex work in ceramic sculpture, pottery-making or mosaics are studied in this class. It is expected that the students in this class will explore and develop their personal approach to both ceramic art and glazing/firing techniques. One other class in ceramics is required before enrolling in this class. The requirements are designed to develop a strong sense of the history in ceramics and the students’ own skills in ceramic art. This course may be taken as an independent study. .

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 370 Spec. Topics & Ind. Study (JR) (3 credits)

Concentrated focus on a selected topic in Studio Art. Topic and content vary from semester to semester. Course may be taken twice for credit as the topic changes.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 372 DirectedProjects - Photography (3 credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to build a comprehensive portfolio of photographic work. Topics include specific shooting assignments that lead to individual projects that investigate the photography student’s personal vision. Lectures and presentations review the work of selected fine art photographers, both historic and contemporary, for group discussion and analysis. With input from the instructor and the class, students develop their own photographic project in traditional, non-silver, or digital media, reflecting historic and/or contemporary genres of image making. May be taken as an independent study with the instructor’s permission during years when it is not regularly scheduled.

Prerequisites: ART 172 or ART 173 or ART 272 or ART 273

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 373 Photo Essay/Docu Photo (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the tradition of documentary photography. Topics will emphasize why people photograph, the stories photographs can tell us, and how photographs can manipulate or evoke emotions. Presentations will include the work of master documentary photographers, both fine art and journalistic, enabling students to discuss and analyze social documentation as well as autobiographical documentation. Assignments will encourage students to look at their own world in a new way and allow them to choose their own subjects for a photographic essay. May be taken as an independent study with the instructor’s permission during years when it is not regularly scheduled.

Prerequisites: ART 273

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 374 Studio Photography (3 credits)

This course investigates the versatility and creative potential of the photographic studio and the “directed” photographic stage. Topics will include portraiture, full figure study, still life, and staged environments, as well as the controlled lighting and set-ups of a photographic studio. Contemporary and historical references will include slide presentations, as well as visits to a museum or gallery and a professional photography studio. May be taken as an independent study with the instructor’s permission during years when it is not regularly scheduled.

Prerequisites: ART 1721 (may be taken concurrently) or ART 172 (may be taken concurrently)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Fine Performing Arts.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 444 Ceramics IV (3 credits)

More complex work in ceramic sculpture, pottery-making or mosaics is studied in this class. It is expected that the students in this class will explore and develop their personal approach to both ceramic art and glazing/firing techniques. One other class in ceramics is required before enrolling in this class. The requirements are designed to develop a strong sense of the history in ceramics and the students’ own skills in ceramic art. This course may be taken as an independent study. .

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 470 Spec. Topics & Ind. Study (SR) (3 credits)

Concentrated focus on a selected topic in Art at an advanced level. Course may be taken twice for credit as the topic changes. GEP certifications vary by section

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 491 Internship in the Arts I (3 credits)

Junior and Senior art majors may broaden their perspective by completing an approved internship in the arts. Work in industry, art studios, theatres, galleries and museums offers potential opportunities for internships. Students are expected to spend six to eight hours per week on site, and to maintain a weekly journal of their experiences and to secure a report by their immediate supervisor at mid semester and upon completion of the work. Prior approval by the chair is required.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 492 Internship in the Arts II (3 credits)

Junior and Senior art majors may broaden their perspective by completing an approved internship in the arts. Work in industry, art studios, theatres, galleries and museums offers potential opportunities for internships. Students are expected to spend six to eight hours per week on site, and to maintain a weekly journal of their experiences and to secure a report by their immediate supervisor at mid semester and upon completion of the work. Prior approval by the chair is required.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 493 Ind. Research in the Arts I (3 credits)

Students pursuing advanced independent projects, especially those in connection with departmental or university honors, may register for these courses under the direct mentorship of department faculty. Prior approval of both faculty mentor and chair required.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 494 Ind. Research in the Arts II (3 credits)

Students pursuing advanced independent projects, especially those in connection with departmental or university honors, may register for these courses under the direct mentorship of department faculty. Prior approval of both faculty mentor and chair required.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 495 Senior Project I (Capstone) (3 credits)

A student majoring in Art (excluding double majors) must do a supervised senior project, which combines both production and analysis. Under a mentor’s guidance the student researches some specific aspect of one of the arts; the first semester’s research should result in a paper describing the research and its intended product. The second semester’s work consists of production and final exhibition or research paper. (Art Education majors and double majors may, but are not required to complete the Senior Project courses. Instead those students may take two additional Art courses).

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 496 Senior Project II (Capstone) (3 credits)

A student majoring in Art (excluding double majors) must do a supervised senior project, which combines both production and analysis. Under a mentor’s guidance the student researches some specific aspect of one of the arts; the first semester’s research should result in a paper describing the research and its intended product. The second semester’s work consists of production and final exhibition or research paper. (Art Education majors and double majors may, but are not required to complete the Senior Project courses. Instead those students may take two additional Art courses).

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ART 497 Professional Practices Seminar (3 credits)

The class is a seminar with practical applications. It is part laboratory for hands-on projects and part discussion group. Projects include: creation of a professional website, creation of a professional resume and creation of writing samples, application for a grant and public speaking. Class trips to galleries and museums will form the basis for discussions about contemporary art and for critical writing assignments. Topics under discussion include: the transition from student to professional, job searches, gallery contracts, grant applications, graduate school options and trends in contemporary art. Class attendance and participation are mandatory. By the end of the semester, students will have a website for their work, a resume, an artist statement and writing samples. They will know how to apply for a grant and they will be aware of the possibilities for employment and exhibition in the arts. The class is aimed at Art majors, but those outside the major will also find it useful.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate