English (ENG)

ENG N001 Non-Credit English Special Top (1 credit)

ENG N002 Non-Credit Pres & Writ Skills (1 credit)

ENG N003 Business Writing (1 credit)

ENG N004 Non-Credit - Writing Workshop (1 credit)

ENG N005 Non-Credit-Eff Comm Skills (1 credit)

ENG N006 Non-Credit:Public Speaking (1 credit)

ENG N007 Non-Cred:Com Mess Multime Mktg (1 credit)

ENG N008 Non-Cre Rep Labor Fict & Film (1 credit)

ENG 100 Communication Skills (3 credits)

ENG 101 Craft of Language (3 credits)

A study of the use and power of words including poetic terms and of how words are best put together in an essay. This is mainly a writing course, and literary form will be used as a means to teach writing. The emphasis will be on expository prose. Required of all students except those qualifying for Advanced Placement. GEP Variable Course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 102 Texts & Contexts (3 credits)

A course in the reading of key literary texts in both the British and American traditions. Students will examine a representative sampling of texts in detail, with guided instruction in writing personal, critical, and creative responses to them. Required of all students except those transfer students who have taken an equivalent course elsewhere. GEP Signature Course.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111 or ENG 1015

Attributes: Signature Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

ENG 103 Communication Skills (3 credits)

Fundamental principles of clear and effective writing: selection, organization, development, expression. Elementary instruction and practice in narrative, descriptive, and expository prose. For students who have lower than a B in transfer credits for ENG 101 or equivalent or who would like additional writing instruction before going on to more advanced writing courses. Principles and practice of both written and oral expression as they are related to the effective selection, organization, and development of ideas. Attention will be given to several modes of writing and speaking, with special emphasis on the expository and the argumentative. Students will study composing as a continuous process—brainstorming, rough drafts, several revisions, the finished product. Available only to students enrolled in the PLS or HDC programs

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 111 Exposition/Argumentation (3 credits)

ENG 112 Research-Based Writing (3 credits)

ENG 113 Literature & Composition (3 credits)

Introduction to fiction, drama, and poetry with frequent theme assignments, critical in nature and coordinated with readings in major literary genres. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111. Signature Course. Available only to students enrolled in the PLS or HDC programs

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111 or ENG 112

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 140 Adult Learning Seminar (3 credits)

In this seminar, adult learners will study the idea of work through reading fiction and nonfiction on jobs, employment, and careers. Students will read stories about work and write narratives of work histories that will provide the context and experience for the course. In the second part of the course, students will reflect and theorize on these histories as either empowering sources of vocation, discouraging instances of alienation, or some combination of both. In the final part of the course, students will then engage with either their own present work or future work by preparing cover letters and resumes for their future job applications and writing a significant piece of communication (business proposal, conflict resolution, grant application, etc.) within their current or prospective professional career. Available only to students enrolled in the PLS or HDC programs

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Adult Learning Seminar

ENG 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

The First-Year Seminar is designed to introduce students to the adventures of learning in a college context. First-Year Seminars focus in depth on a question or topic of disciplinary or interdisciplinary interest. By means of its specific focus, the seminar will explore the thinking, research, and writing practices in a particular field. Discussions based on careful reading of texts, writing assignments, both reflection and research types, and in- class student presentations will be supplemented, as appropriate, with activities including guest lecturers, museum trips, attendance at local cultural events and/or field excursions. Topics vary according to individual instructors. First year seminar.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

ENG 196 Engilsh Elective (3 credits)

ENG 201 Major American Writers (3 credits)

Study of selected works of those writers who have most influenced the continuity and development of our national literature. Among those considered may be Irving, Poe, Emerson, Fuller, Hawthorne, Stowe, Melville, Whitman, Twain, Dickinson, Chopin, Gilman, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Morrison.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 202 Global English Literature (3 credits)

This course examines English as a global literary language through works of fiction and film. Students will read works by authors who represent diverse regions of the English-speaking world beyond the United Kingdom (excluding the U.S.) that expand the English language, rethink the present-day legacy of the British Empire, and redefine conceptions of Englishness. Specific course topics and reading lists vary with each course offering. Diversity/Globalization/Non-Western overlay.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GEP Art/Literature, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ENG 203 The Poet's Voice (3 credits)

The primary emphasis will be on the reading of major poems in English seen as performances in language requiring close attention to the text. The historical and cultural concerns reflected will also receive attention.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 204 Drama (3 credits)

Critical study of various forms of drama.

Prerequisites: ENG 1105 or ENG 113

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 205 Cultural Diversity (3 credits)

Specific focus of the course will depend on the instructor. Approaches to the issue of cultural diversity in literature may include the courses such as the following: American Voices; British Multiculturalism and the Booker Prize, or Multiethnic Literature. Diversity Globalization/Non-Western overlay.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 206 Public Speaking & Presentation (3 credits)

A practical course in the oral presentation of carefully crafted material. Based on principles of rhetoric, new and old, the course helps students in discovering, structuring, and expressing ideas with conviction and confidence. Some attention will be given to the appreciation of significant speech texts within these rhetorical traditions. Students will make multiple presentations and engage in peer critiques.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, BUAD FBEN LEOS ILC Area Course, Undergraduate

ENG 207 Images of Women in Literature (3 credits)

Specific focus of this course will be the female character in literature and the construction of gender identity. Primarily literary and historical in approach, but may include the psychological and the mythic. Works by a variety of authors in several genres will be examined.

Attributes: English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 208 Special Topics in Literature (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, the course will focus on a particular topic of interest in literature (e.g., American West in Imagination, Psychology and Literature).

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 209 Literature and Film (3 credits)

This course deals with film treatments of significant literary texts. Specific focus of the courses depends on the instructor (e.g., King Arthur In Literature and Film, American War Literature and Film: Vietnam to Now, Horror in Literature and Film, etc.).

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 210 The Roaring Twenties (3 credits)

Exploration of diverse writers who were part of the “make it new” challenge in the tumult of cultural change during the 1920s in America, with particular attention given to contributions by Anderson, Fitzgerald, Millay, Cummings, Parker, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neill, and Hughes.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 211 Black Popular Culture (3 credits)

Beginning with W. E. B. Du Bois’s 1897 essay “The Problem of Amusement” we trace the trajectory of the literary interpretations of Black popular culture in the U.S. paying particular attention to its evolution through detective fiction, graphic novels, new media, and science fiction. Likely authors include: Kyle Baker, Octavia Butler, Chester Himes, Nalo Hopkinson, Aaron McGruder, Mia McKenzie, and Walter Mosely. Diversity/Globalization/Non- Western overlay Africana Studies.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 215 Passing Narratives - Black Lit (3 credits)

Beginning with W. E. B. Du Bois’s 1897 essay “The Problem of Amusement” we trace the trajectory of the literary interpretations of Black popular culture in the U.S. paying particular attention to its evolution through detective fiction, graphic novels, new media, and science fiction. Likely authors include: Kyle Baker, Octavia Butler, Chester Himes, Nalo Hopkinson, Aaron McGruder, Mia McKenzie, and Walter Mosely. Diversity/Globalization/Non- western overlay. Africana Studies.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 216 Re-Reading the Sixties (3 credits)

Exploration of representative texts from diverse parts of the universe-in-revision that was the 1960s—from Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove to Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five; from Sylvia Plath’s Ariel to Dennis Hopper’s Easy Rider; from Nikki Giovanni’s poetry to Bonnie and Clyde; from Tom Wolfe’s Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test to Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49. We start with "Berkeley in the Sixties," and it never ends.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 217 Music & American Literature (3 credits)

This course will study the relation of words to music in several different forms: songs, musical shows, an opera, and references to music in poems and novels. It will cover mostly popular music of the twentieth century, including ragtime, blues, jazz, and rock. The class will listen to music and learn some elementary reading of music. Broader topics will involve race, ethnicity, gender, romance, and youth culture.

ENG 218 Lesbian & Gay Narrative (3 credits)

Lesbian and Gay Narrative is designed to introduce students to works by and about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and queer or questioning persons. Our survey will include works in a variety of genres: plays, novels (including one graphic novel and one bio mythography), essays and poetry. These will come from a range of historical periods.

ENG 222 SophSem:Critical App Lit Study (3 credits)

A seminar, ideally taken by English majors in the sophomore year, to explore a variety of significant texts in the British and American tradition, each to be examined from diverse critical perspectives, including (but not limited to) the following: formalist/New Critical, structuralist, New Historicist, feminist, deconstruction/poststructuralist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, race/ethnic/postcolonial studies. Restricted to English majors and minors.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in English.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 231 Introduction to Theater (3 credits)

ENG 241 Creative Writing:Intro Wrkshop (3 credits)

Exploration of at least two creative genres (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, plays). For models and inspiration, students will examine selected works by contemporary creative writers in varied styles. Writing workshop format. .

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 261 News Reporting (3 credits)

This course introduces students to reporting and writing for the news media. In frequent assignments throughout the semester, students will practice the basic principles of journalism with an emphasis on structure, accuracy, clarity and style, key for journalists working in any medium. They will gain experience in story pitching and development and in newsgathering methods, including interviewing, fact gathering and fact checking. Additionally, students will study timely topics related to journalism ethics and the law as well as journalism’s transition into the digital age. While this course is based in the classroom, students are expected to learn and adhere to professional newsroom standards. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track, Undergraduate

ENG 263 Writing for Organizations (3 credits)

Comprehensive examination of various forms of writing that are produced in managing organizations, including email, memoranda, letters, reports, brochures, guidelines, and slide share presentation materials. Writing Intensive overlay.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 264 Techniques of Bus Presentation (3 credits)

An examination of the business planning cycle with emphasis on the final delivery stage—with concern for developing an effective format and style of both oral and written presentations. The role of technology in all forms of presentation will be considered. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 265 Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the basic strategies and techniques of public relations writing through the creation and evaluation of a variety of materials commonly used in PR. Students will gain core knowledge of the following: AP style, branding, crisis communication, social media (Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn), audience targeting, blogging, media kits, media tracking, fact sheets, press releases, feature articles, and brochures. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 266 Case Studies: PR & Advertising (3 credits)

A study of effective and ineffective cases in the history of public relations and advertising.

ENG 267 Negotiations, Writing&Conflict (3 credits)

The course involves students in an eclectic writing process that includes legal research, conflict analysis and public speaking. Modeled in part upon the Harvard Negotiation Project’s Getting To Yes methodology, the course also involves newly emerging practices that challenge the notion of argument and encourage exchange between disputing parties. The thesis of the course is that, when individuals embroiled in a conflict begin to hear and understand one another’s stories, they have the option to change and to grow. Although courtrooms and trials will be examined, quite unlike a law course, the format for our class includes dramatic performance, passages from fiction and poetry as well as essays to reveal the common sense that can provide peace between warring interests. The focused goal of this sequence of readings, dramatic exercises and writing is for each student to evolve and to articulate communication strategies for crisis situations.

ENG 268 Persuasion/Influence in Media (3 credits)

In this course, we will examine some of the theories, concepts, and research associated with persuasion and their application for ethical and effective interaction in personal, professional and mass media settings. In addition, emphasis will be placed on social influence, compliance gaining and deception. Class activities, discussions, readings and assignments are designed to facilitate a "better understanding of how persuasion functions, an improved knowledge of ways to maximize our own persuasive efforts, and a greater ability to resist influence attempts, especially unscrupulous influence attempts, by others" (Gass, Seiter, 2007).

ENG 301 Middle English Literature (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of Middle English literature, excluding Chaucer, by beginning with the earliest Middle English texts and ending with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will focus on language, translation, and close reading to start, with the goal of arriving at a broader consideration of the Middle English literary tradition and its role in the creation of English literature as we now know it.

Attributes: English Area 2 - Medieval/Ren, English Early Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 302 Renaissance Non-dramatic Lit (3 credits)

Was the Renaissance the age of the individual? Was poetry – the dominant literature of the day – a means to power, a force for good or instead a corrupting agent? This course will consider divergent views on the English Renaissance alongside major works by authors such as Sidney, Spenser and Milton.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English.

Attributes: English Area 2 - Medieval/Ren, English Early Lit, English Literary Theory, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 303 Renaissance Drama (3 credits)

A study of the drama of Tudor and Jacobean England, excluding Shakespeare. The plays of Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford and their distinctive dramatic qualities will be emphasized. Acceptable for Theatre/Drama track.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English.

Attributes: English Area 2 - Medieval/Ren, English Theatre/Drama, English Early Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 305 Eighteenth Century English Lit (3 credits)

This course deals with the literature of the Restoration and eighteenth-century, a time of intellectual, cultural, and political revolutions. Among the writers who may be studied are Behn, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Johnson, Sterne, Burney, Inchbald, and Wollstonecraft. Depending on the instructor, the course may focus on a particular genre or it may deal with a specialized topic, such as “The Rise of Gender in the Novel,” “The Idea of Authorship in the 18th Century,” or “The Satiric Mode.”

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 306 Nineteenth Century English Lit (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, the course may be focused in a variety of ways, all exploring different developments in literature in England in the 19th Century (Major Romantic Poets, The Nineteenth-Century English Novel, Rebels-Reactionaries: Victorian Romanticism, Victorian Literature).

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 307 Modernism: British & Irish Lit (3 credits)

A study of representative authors of British and Irish Modernism, including Auden, Conrad, Eliot, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Yeats. Depending on the instructor, this course may also explore works by Bowen, Ford, Lewis, Moore, O'Brien, Wilde, or other authors.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 310 20th Century Irish Literature (3 credits)

Investigates crucial authors and stages in the development of Irish literature in English from the period of Gregory, Joyce, O'Casey, Synge, and Yeats, through the mid-century period of Beckett, Behan, Bowen, Kavanagh, and O'Brien, to works by late twentieth-century authors (for example, Banville, Boland, Carr, Enright, Friel, and Heaney)

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 311 Contemporary Brit & Irish Lit (3 credits)

A study of contemporary, representative British and Irish novelists, playwrights, and poets from the Thatcher era to the present

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 315 Literature of South Asia (3 credits)

This course examines contemporary fiction and film from the Indian subcontinent (primarily India, but with some focus on Pakistan as well). Works studied include both Anglophone texts and texts in translation read alongside major events of twentieth- and twenty-first century South Asian history, particularly Independence and Partition. Featured authors may include: Mulk Raj Anand, Saadat Hasan Manto, R.K. Narayan, Arundhati Roy, and Salman Rushdie. Diversity/ Globalization/Non-western overlay.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ENG 317 Literature of South Africa (3 credits)

This course provides a historical view of South African literature, focusing on apartheid, its segregationist precedents, and its present-day legacies. Utilizing novels, historical and legal documents, and creative nonfiction, as well as short fiction and film, the course introduces students to the writings of South Africans who represent diverse subject positions and experiences, but who are all united in the common goal of re- examining and working through South Africa’s traumatic past. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western overlay. Africana Studies.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Eng. British/Irish/World Lit, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Globalization Course (New GEP), Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

ENG 319 Postmodernism (3 credits)

Engagement with a wide range of writers whose work represents both radical extension and rejection of the earlier modernist movement, with exploration of texts by Fowles, Barth, Barthelme, Calvino, Heller, Vonnegut, Pyncheon, Smith, Eggers.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Honors Program Student attribute.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, English Area 5 - American Lit, GER Art/Literature, GEP Art/Literature, Honors Course, Undergraduate

ENG 320 Contexts of Faith in Modrn Lit (3 credits)

This course examines representations of religious faith in a variety of literary genres (fiction, drama, poetry, film) from the 20th century to the present. Students will consider to what extent the texts studied reflect and develop traditional expressions of religion and the degree to which they engage readers in an evaluation of faith as a source of knowledge. Acceptable for Faith and Reason GEP requirement.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, Faith-Reason Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

ENG 321 Early American Literature (3 credits)

A study of the literary genres that emerged from the colonization of North America and the establishment of the federal republic of the United States, with a focus on the role of literature in defining American national identity. Readings will include histories, journals, sermons, poems, autobiographies, and novels by authors including John Winthop, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Olaudah Equiano, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, as well as explorers, Indigenous people, and other early national authors.

Attributes: American Studies Course, English Area 5 - American Lit, English Early Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 322 Amer Romantic & Trancend Lit (3 credits)

An in-depth study of the writers associated with the Transcendentalism and the social reform movements they inspired, including abolition, women's suffrage, labor reform, and projects of associated living. Authors considered include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Frederick Douglass, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman. A variety of critical and creative writing assignments will provide opportunities for us to reflect on how matters of race, gender, class and ethnicity continue to affect perceptions of democracy today.

Attributes: American Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 323 American Literature 1865-1915 (3 credits)

A survey of American literature between the Civil War and World War I, from realism to naturalism, with consideration of such writers as Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dickinson, Robinson, Cable, Wharton, Norris, and Dreiser.

Attributes: American Studies Course, English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 324 Twentieth Century American Lit (3 credits)

An exploration of a century of dramatic change in the American literary landscape—from Dreiser’s Sister Carrie to Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye; through poets as diverse as E. E. Cummings, Allen Ginsberg, and Rita Dove; with options that may include key work from William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Sylvia Plath, Don DeLillo, and Louise Erdrich.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 325 Contemporary American Lit (3 credits)

An exploration of representative American works (creative non-fiction, fiction, poetry) from the past 25 years— including books from Jhumpa Lahiri, Joy Harjo, Tobias Wolfe, Junot Diaz, Mark Doty, Kevin Powers, David Eggers and Cheryl Strayed.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 327 Southern Literature (3 credits)

An overview of Southern literature from the nineteenth century to the present, with consideration of both poetry and fiction. Selected authors may include Poe, Twain, Faulkner, Welty, Warren, Taylor, Styron, Smith, Edgerton, and McCorkle.

Attributes: American Studies Course, English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 328 African American Literature (3 credits)

This thematic survey explores how African American authors write about what it means (and has meant) to be a Black person in the U.S. Exploring poetry, autobiography, drama, short stories, novels, essays, and films we grapple with the multifaceted experiences of “Blackness” in literary texts produced from the era of slavery to the present. Through our reading we develop an understanding of specific African American literary traditions. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western overlay. Africana Studies.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 329 Black Women's Literature (3 credits)

Linked by history, race, gender, and fate, but arguably little else, how do Black women writing in the U.S. write themselves into the idea of America? This course examines exclusively Black women’s literature in order to answer this question. Covering a minimum of three traditional African American literary periods, students are positioned to question notions of privilege and power driven by the intersectionalities of gender and race. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western. Africana Studies.

Attributes: American Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 330 Caribbean Lit in English (3 credits)

This course explores the intersectionalities of racial, ethnic, and linguistic identities within Anglophone and Francophone Caribbean literary traditions. In dialogue these literary traditions complicate a monolithic Caribbean narrative. With careful study of language, class, color, and identity we determine how authors contend with and memorialize French, British, and American imperialisms in the Caribbean. Likely authors include: Michelle Cliff, Edwidge Danticat, Merle Hodge, Thomas Glave, George Lamming, and Jamaica Kincaid. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western. Africana Studies.

ENG 331 Modern Drama (3 credits)

Major English and continental dramatists of the modern period from Ibsen to the present; a survey emphasizing not only major writers but also significant changes in dramatic form.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 332 Playwriting (3 credits)

This course offers students the experience of creating original material for stage presentation, with particular focus on the one-act play structure and concern for character, scene, and plot development.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Theatre/Drama, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 333 Read,Write,Adapt Thtre Drama (3 credits)

Examination of the diverse functions of the dramaturge developing background perspective for bringing dramatic texts to the stage, adapting various texts for stage presentation, writing interpretive notes for staged productions. Students will adapt literary texts for Reader’s Theatre performance.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Theatre/Drama, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 341 Poetry Workshop (3 credits)

Exploration of poetry by reading and writing. Each student will be responsible for creating a set of poems. Writing workshop format.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 342 Fiction Workshop (3 credits)

Exploration of fiction by reading and writing. Each student will be responsible for creating a set of stories. Writing workshop format.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate

ENG 343 Nonfiction Workshop (3 credits)

Exploration of creative nonfiction by reading and writing, with particular focus on the form of the personal essay. Each student will be responsible for creating a set of essays. Writing workshop format.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 344 Screenwriting (3 credits)

Exploration of screenwriting in a workshop format with consideration of the whole process involved in development of screen projects, including feature-length film projects. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate

ENG 345 Tutor Prac, Writ Cntr Thry Pr (3 credits)

This course introduces students to writing center history, theories, and practices. Readings include landmark and contemporary texts about writing pedagogy in general and the tutoring of writing specifically. Additionally, students study issues and strategies of relevance to ESL writers for whom English is not their first or home language. Students are introduced to the practices of peer tutoring through class discussions and through observation and tutoring in the University Writing Center. Upon successful completion of this course, they are eligible to be hired in subsequent semesters as writing tutors. Open to students from all majors who are interested in writing and/or the teaching of writing. Permission of instructor required. Writing Intensive. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 346 Writing for Digital Platforms (3 credits)

This course explores the changing role and style of writing in our digital age. Students will practice multiple genres of writing across a variety of digital platforms, including journalistic writing, business writing and personal writing. Students will practice adapting and revising stories for multimodal delivery to target specific audiences while maintaining accuracy and consistency in content. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 350 Adv Tools for News Writing (3 credits)

"Advanced Tools for News Writing" is an upper-level reporting class that teaches students practical skills for real world journalism, whether that's emailing a source for an interview, filing a FOIA request, pulling police/ courts documents or distilling an academic report into 300 words for a quick web post. It’s for students who have serious potential but have little idea how to develop a story idea and do the reporting needed to nail it down in this fast-paced journalism landscape. This course focuses on where to find and how to use resources that allow students to work at the fast pace necessary to succeed in digital journalism.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate

ENG 360 Feature Writing (3 credits)

At its most basic definition, feature writing is journalism that tells a story—generally, the kind of story that you don’t soon forget, that lingers for many moments, or days, or years after you first encounter it. In this course, students study outstanding examples of feature stories and multimedia feature packages. From those examples, they learn how to combine the best reporting practices with the best storytelling practices in order to produce their own powerful features that marry in-depth reporting and research with captivating and creative storytelling skills. Students should have taken ENG 261 or have prior journalism experience before enrolling in this course. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 361 Mobile Journalism (3 credits)

This course examines the impact of mobile technology on news organizations around the world and the ways in which these organizations capitalize on mobile technology as a delivery platform. On a practical (and practiced) level, students spend the semester using mobile technology as journalists. They explore social media platforms of particular use to journalists as well as produce their own media content using various mobile tools. Students should have taken ENG 261 or have prior journalism experience before enrolling in this course. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate

ENG 362 Photojournalism (3 credits)

This is an introductory course in photojournalism presented in a multimedia context. Students will be required to have access to either point-and-shoot cameras or (ideally) DSLR camera kits. The course will be taught as a hands-on workshop. Instruction will progress from basic camera operation and single image assignments to more comprehensive visual storytelling. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track, Undergraduate

ENG 363 Sports Journalism (3 credits)

This hands-on, multimedia course covers all aspects of current sports journalism, from reporting and telling stories in print and broadcast media as well as in blogs, podcasts and social media. In addition to learning how to break news across multiple platforms, students will practice the kind of in-depth reporting and compelling storytelling that leads to profiles and full-length features. Students should have taken ENG 261 or have prior journalism experience before enrolling in this course. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track, Undergraduate

ENG 364 History of Journalism (3 credits)

This course surveys the history of journalism and mass media in the United States (from the colonial press to contemporary news media). Topics include the Revolutionary period; the emergence of the penny press; yellow journalism; women’s stunt journalism; the African American Press; muckraking; and the evolution of “modern” mainstream journalism. Students will gain an understanding of the role of journalism in the U.S., while also becoming critical consumers of news media. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 365 Multimedia Reporting (3 credits)

This course examines the defining place of writing in the directing, the editing and the scripting of texts for video and cinema. To learn the many kinds of composition involved in this process, students will work to construct documentary, advertising and dramatic film productions. In this process, students will become knowledgeable of the digital cameras and editorial computer technologies involved in filmmaking; however, the writing of prose and dialogue will be the main concentration of the course.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track, Undergraduate

ENG 370 Independent Study:Jr. Level (3 credits)

The chief purpose of the junior-level independent study project is for the student to acquire knowledge in a particular area of literature (reading and research project) or to produce a substantial piece of writing, either creative or discursive (writing project). For the reading and research project, the student will develop a course of study with the project director that may utilize audiovisual as well as printed material. In addition to a reading program, the student will write a substantial paper that develops from that reading program; the paper should use primary texts and have a textual perspective—historical, critical, aesthetic, or mythic. For the writing project, the student will develop a program of reading and writing with the project director. Minimum GPA of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field).

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 381 History of the Eng Language (3 credits)

A survey of the outer and inner history of the English language, from its Indo-European origins to its present American and worldwide use, including dialectal variations in modern American English. This course fulfills requirements within the Linguistics Major and Minor. See LIN 381.

Attributes: English Early Lit, Undergraduate

ENG 382 Lit Theo:Plato to Poststructur (3 credits)

Examination of some of the major issues in literary theory from the time of Plato to the present, including, but not limited to, the rhetorical effect of literature, the relationship between the text and the world, notions of the expressive power of literature, the formal qualities of the literary text, and poststructuralist notions of language. The course provides students with the opportunity to draw upon theory for their own literary analyses and prompts them to formulate their own theories about what literature is and does. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Literary Theory, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 383 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

Focused examination of some key factors in rhetoric over the ages: for example, invention strategies, the ethics of writing, methods of delivery. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 384 The Essay (3 credits)

A comprehensive study of the essay form through time, with special concern for identifying forces of change upon the style and function of the essay within selected cultural contexts. Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 401 Chaucer & the Medieval World (3 credits)

An examination of the development of various medieval narrative forms, including the romance, and the climax of their development in the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer. The major historical focus will be on work written in England from 1300 to 1485; there will be some continental material included.

Attributes: English Area 2 - Medieval/Ren, English Area 4- British/Irish, English Early Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 402 Shakespeare: Early Works (3 credits)

Shakespeare’s early plays and poems before 1601, primarily the histories and comedies. Close attention will be given to the dramatic structure in Shakespeare’s plays with special emphasis on the poetic.

Attributes: English Area 2 - Medieval/Ren, English Area 3 - Shakespeare, English Area 4- British/Irish, European Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 403 Shakespeare: Later Works (3 credits)

A reading of Shakespeare’s plays from Hamlet to The Tempest. Close attention will be given to the dramatic structure in Shakespeare’s plays with special emphasis on the poetic. A special study of the problem plays and the tragedies.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Early Lit, European Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 404 Eng,Irish,Anglophone Authors (3 credits)

An in-depth study of one to two significant authors of a particular period, the choice to be made by the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: European Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 405 Henry VIII n Life & Literature (3 credits)

A study of writings from and about Henry VIII and his court, with a particular focus on the controversial personalities of Thomas Wolsey, Thomas More, Thomas Cromwell, Anne Boleyn, Katherine of Aragon, and Henry himself. May include poems by Wyatt and Surrey, Cavendish’s Life of Wolsey, Shakespeare and Fletcher’s play Henry VIII, More’s Utopia and other of his works, the second novel in Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall series (Bring up the Bodies), and selected writings about Henry’s firs divorce. Ethics Intensive overlay

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and PHL 154

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, European Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 407 20thCenturyBritish/Irish Novel (3 credits)

A study of major developments in British and Irish fiction from World War I to the present, including Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Beckett. Depending on the instructor, this course may also explore works by Bowen, Ford, Fowles, Greene, Lewis, Moore, O'Brien, or other authors.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 410 Irish Gothic Fiction (3 credits)

Interrogating issues of genre and historical context, this course traces the evolution of Irish gothic and ghost stories from the early nineteenth century to the present.

Attributes: English Area 4- British/Irish, English Literary Theory, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 411 Black British Literature (3 credits)

This course focuses on narrative and criticism by Black British writers since the 1948 arrival of the Empire Windrush. We examine the way “Blackness” in Britain has been called upon to both unite and exclude while exploring the contested perception that Black experience in Britain should be examined solely in terms of race and identity. Likely authors include: Sam Selvon, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Jackie Kay, Andrea Levy, Caryl Phillips, and Zadie Smith. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western overlay. Africana Studies.

ENG 415 Postcolonial Studies (3 credits)

An examination of diverse literary texts, films and theoretical essays that engage the idea of "post colonialism," the circumstances and effects of one nation having sovereign power over another. We will emphasize works with a relationship to the British Empire (e.g., Forster, Conrad, Rushdie, Collins, Dickens, Joyce, Winterson), but we will not be limited to this particular historical context. . Diversity/Globalization/Non-western overlay

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 416 Rebellious Women Writers (3 credits)

This course explores how British and American women of the late seventeenth to early twentieth centuries used writing to rebel against the status quo. We will examine both the historical circumstances in which women found themselves and the literary production that resulted. We will examine a wide variety of women’s texts–– narrative fictions, poetry, political polemics, conduct books, letters, autobiographies, social theories, sermons, and protest leaflets––and we will discuss the effects of these different responses to women’s plight. We will look closely at the influences that British and American writers exerted upon one another. Diversity

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 4- British/Irish, English Early Lit, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 417 Post-Soul Black Literature (3 credits)

ENG 420 American Authors (3 credits)

An in-depth study of one or two significant American authors, the choice to be made by the instructor.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 421 American Novel, 19th 20th Cent (3 credits)

A study of the evolution of the novel in America; may include novels by Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Chesnutt, Wharton, James, Hemingway, Pyncheon, Bellow, Updike, Kesey, Tan, Silko, or others depending on the instructor.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 423 Amer.Poetry, 19th & 20th Cent. (3 credits)

An analytical study of poetic development, with emphasis on Romantic and modern theory and practice. Among those studied: Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, and Frost.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 424 Contemporary American Poetry (3 credits)

An exploration of the American poetry scene, from the 1950s to the present, including representative works from a number of movements: the Beats, the Confessionals, the Black Arts movement, women’s poetry, the New York School, deep image poetry, and most recently, Language Poetry and New Formalism. The course is writing-intensive, with a student response journal and various assignments—including creative imitations, an explication, an analytical essay, and a review of a poetry collection.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 425 American Drama (3 credits)

A critical study of selected plays. The emphasis will be on the works of O’Neill, Wilder, Williams, Miller, MacLeish, and Albee. Acceptable for Theatre/Drama track.

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, English Theatre/Drama, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 426 Nature Writing in America (3 credits)

Examination of the literary treatment of nature in American culture, from Thoreau’s Walden through the environmentalist writers of the contemporary period.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Area 5 - American Lit, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 427 The Harlem Renaissance (3 credits)

Black artists in Harlem (and other densely populated urban areas) produced a significant collection of work remarkable for its breadth and complexity during the anachronistically named Harlem Renaissance (1922-1941). This course explores that creative explosion in an attempt to develop a comprehensive understanding of what compelled the movement and why the Harlem Renaissance continues to be so influential in Black literature and culture today. ENG 215, 328, or 329 recommended. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western overlay. Africana Studies.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 428 The Beat Rebellion (3 credits)

A study of writers in the 1950s and early 1960s whose work reflected rebellion with regard to social and cultural norms.

Attributes: American Studies Course, English Area 5 - American Lit, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 429 ReadingWritingCivil Right Move (3 credits)

Consideration of how writing—speeches, poetry, fiction, and autobiography—both responded to and documented the Civil Rights movement and how writing was used to shape a social change agenda—with a close look at the rhetorical strategies involved in a wide range of texts; authors will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Taylor Branch, John Steinbeck, Alice Walker, and Eudora Welty. Diversity/Globalization/Non-western overlay.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 1 - Writing, English Area 5 - American Lit, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 431 Special Topics in Theater (3 credits)

Course content to be determined by instructor.

Attributes: English Theatre/Drama, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 432 Theater Performance Practicum (3 credits)

Rehearsal and performance of a campus production (produced by the Cap and Bells Dramatic Society and directed by a faculty director) with the student in the role of actor or stage manager. Comprehensive study of the rehearsal and performance processes which culminates in the writing of a final research paper of ten pages in length. In order to register for this course, the production must be the third campus production in which the student has served as cast member or stage manager. Instructor approval required.

Attributes: English Theatre/Drama, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 433 Writing and Environmt Justice (3 credits)

ENG 441 Literacy as a Social Practice (3 credits)

An investigation of literacy as a social practice, using composition theory, ethnography, fiction, autobiography, and popular culture to define literacy and ask questions about it. With concern for the defining forces of race, class, and gender, the course explores different uses of literacy and considers the concept of a literacy "crisis." Students will compose narratives of their own literacy practices and pursue independent research on some aspect of literacy and its applications to schools, society, and quality of life. Diversity. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 443 Special Topics in Writing (3 credits)

In this course, students will engage in writing projects based on a specialized area of study (e.g., Writing and Faith, Running to Write).

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 444 Writing throughRaceClassGender (3 credits)

Through critical readings in autobiography and creative writing exercises, an exploration of the forces brought to bear on production of texts by race and gender experience. Diversity. Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement. Writing Intensive overlay

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 1 - Writing, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 445 Gender & Narrative (3 credits)

A writing course designed to explore alternative and experimental genres that combat sexism and do social and political work, with particular focus on narratives developed to challenge dominant cultural structures and practices. Diversity. Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Diversity, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 446 Writing the Grant Proposal (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the grant-making process from initial research to the submission of a final proposal. Students will first work together to consult for a single non-profit, while learning about the components of a strong grant proposal and the grant-making process overall. Then, each student will be paired with a local nonprofit organization, as volunteer consultants for that organization. Students will work with their nonprofit organization to identify a new or existing project that needs funding. They will then take what they learn in class about the grant-making process and apply it to meet the needs of their nonprofit “client,” with the ultimate goal of producing a complete grant proposal that can be submitted to funders

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate

ENG 450 Hospital Stories (3 credits)

In this course, students explore how race, class, gender, and sexuality are depicted through the writing of caregivers, medical professionals, and patients in essays, memoirs, and creative nonfiction. The course focuses on how cultural difference affects access to medical care and perceptions of the female body. Other possible topics include mental illness and AIDS/HIV. Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), English Area 1 - Writing, English Diversity, GER Art/Literature, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 452 Writing and Reading Animals (3 credits)

This hybrid literature and writing course considers the representation of animals in a range of texts and explores how the depiction of animals as companions, gods, guides, objects, heroes, or monsters reflects changes in relationships between humans and nature. Students will also use the literary forms we study (fiction, nonfiction, and poetry) to reflect on their own experiences with animals (pets, animals in captivity or in the wild, and in books and films). Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement, Writing Intensive overlay

ENG 460 Magazine Writing (3 credits)

In this course, students gain practice developing story ideas, pitching articles, writing to word-count, and abiding by AP style. The course also examines a variety of glossies plus online magazines in order for students to stay current with changing journalistic practices. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 461 Food Writing (3 credits)

This class explores the political, spiritual, and economic aspects of eating and offers students the chance to practice writing about food in different modes, from restaurant reviews to blog posts to personal essays. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 462 Travel Writing (3 credits)

This course explores the elements of crafting narratives about journeys. Using students’ previous experiences of travel (and current experiences when applicable), students explore the elements of creative nonfiction writing. Students complete a variety of writing exercises, including a detailed travel journal, and other exercises on detail and description. After the exercises, students will write longer narratives that may include a profile of a person or place, a reflective memoir, and an essay about some aspect of another culture’s cuisine or cultural differences. Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 2041 or ENG 261

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track, Undergraduate

ENG 463 Literary Journalism (3 credits)

This reading-intensive course provides an historical overview of a genre most often referred to as "literary journalism," once called "new journalism," and now sometimes dubbed "new journalism" or "immersion journalism." Students may read works by writers such as Nellie Bly, Stephen Crane, John Hersey, Joan Didion, Truman Capote, Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, Ted Konover, Sonia Nazario, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, and Susan Orlean, among others. In addition to their literary consumption and interrogation of the field, students will produce several short exercises in the style of the genre and one final project. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 465 Special Topics in Journalism (3 credits)

Focus on a particular issue in journalism, examination of some trend, of consideration of selected columnists/distinctive voices in journalism. Prerequisite: ENG 261: Introduction to Reporting & Writing, or permission of instructor. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 111

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track, Undergraduate

ENG 466 Journalism & Entrepreneurship (3 credits)

This course prepares and inspires students to approach journalism from the start-up perspective. The theories and practices of entrepreneurial journalism will be studied and simulated, with a special emphasis on new venture creation, cutting-edge business strategy and state-of-the-art storytelling techniques. Students should have taken ENG 261 or have prior journalism experience before enrolling in this course. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 467 Ethics in Journalism (3 credits)

At a time when the news media’s role in society, its accepted practices and its storytelling tools and platforms are all undergoing radical transformations, adhering to ethical standards is more important than ever for veteran and aspiring journalists. This course examines and challenges those ethics, their significance in the public sphere and the principles and theories serving as their foundation. Students should have taken ENG 261 or have prior journalism experience before enrolling in this course. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 468 Global Journalism (3 credits)

This course explores the growing influence and impact of international journalism from native and non-native perspectives. The history and current state of foreign correspondence and war reporting will also be studied, along with the challenges and opportunities of practicing journalism in various parts of the world. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

ENG 469 The Art of Editing (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to three basic levels of editing: substantive editing, copyediting, and proofreading. The course may include guest editor presentations as well as intensive review of grammar and writing skills and an introduction to copyediting marks. Finally, students will try on the multi-faceted roles of an editor––and experience the challenges of balancing aesthetic and pragmatic concerns––through several major writing and editing projects, including one multi-media project. Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 470 Independent Study:Senior Level (3 credits)

The senior-level independent study is for students to engage in faculty mentored research and writing. Students will develop a course of study with the faculty mentor that results in a substantial piece of scholarship, creative writing, or journalism. Minimum GPA of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field).

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 481 Literary Forms & Styles (3 credits)

Specific focus of the course will depend on the instructor. Approaches to the study of genres may be The Satiric Mode, The Lyric, The Short Story in America, Autobiography, The Sonnet, Science Fiction, and Books That Cook.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Literary Theory, GEP Art/Literature, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 482 Literature & Culture (3 credits)

This course focuses on how literature engages readers in thinking through complex cultural problems. Specific focus of the course will depend on the instructor.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 483 Seminar in Narrative Form (3 credits)

Drawing on both fictional and theoretical texts, the course explores how narrative attempts to give meaning and coherence to experience and how readers process narrative. Literary texts include linear and non-linear narratives and range from early modern to postmodern texts. Theoretical perspectives include structuralist, poststructuralist, and feminist. Acceptable for GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Literary Theory, GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 484 Spec Topics in Critical Theory (3 credits)

This course provides an intense focus on a particular area of contemporary literary theory. Depending on the instructor, the course may cover major theoretical movements (e.g., feminist theory, deconstruction, new historicism) or concentrate on certain major figures (e.g., Bakhtin, Derrida, Cixous, Foucault). Does not fulfill GEP Art/Lit requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: English Literary Theory, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

ENG 485 Nature Writing in America (3 credits)

ENG 490 Journalism Internship (3 credits)

The primary purpose of this internship is to introduce a student to journalism experience at a media outlet. In addition to helping students enhance their journalism skills, that experience should also help them to develop their understanding of the journalist’s role in society. Students will normally work from ten to fifteen hours per week at an appropriate site and will meet with their English-department mentor regularly during the semester. Students will maintain a portfolio of work completed, keep a journal or field notes of their working experience, secure an assessment of their work performance from a supervisor, and submit a final reflection essay and an updated resume that includes the internship experience. Restricted to English majors and journalism minors.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, English Journalism Track

ENG 491 IndependentStudy:Community Svc (3 credits)

The primary purpose of this independent study is to introduce a junior or senior to professional writing, editorial, and related skills in a community-service setting. Students will normally work from ten to twenty hours per week at an appropriate site and will meet with their English-department mentors regularly during the semester. Acceptable venues include nonprofit organizations, private and public schools, and other suitable sites. Students will maintain a portfolio of work completed, keep a journal or field notes of their work experiences, secure assessment from a supervisor of their work performance, and submit a final reflection and updated resume that includes the internship experience. Restricted to English majors and minors. Minimum GPA of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field), or permission of mentor and chair.

Attributes: Undergraduate

ENG 492 English Internship (3 credits)

The primary purpose of this independent study is to introduce a student to professional writing, editorial, social media management or related skills in a particular communications area. Students normally work from ten to twenty hours per week at an appropriate site and will meet with their English department mentor regularly during the semester. Acceptable venues include magazines, academic journals, publishing companies, television stations, radio stations, public relations firms and departments, advertising agencies, governmental and university departments, and other suitable sites. Students will maintain a portfolio of work completed, keep a journal or field notes of their working experience, secure assessment from a supervisor of their work performance, and submit a final reflection and updated resume that includes the internship experience. Restricted to English majors and minors. Minimum GPA of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field), or permission of mentor and chair.

Attributes: English Area 1 - Writing, Undergraduate

ENG 493 Indep Research Project (Fall) (3,6 credits)

Includes College Honors theses. Requirements for college honors are listed above and under ‘Honors Program’.

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 494 Indep Research Project (SPR) (3 credits)

Includes College Honors theses. Requirements for college honors are listed above and under ‘Honors Program’

Attributes: GEP Art/Literature, Undergraduate

ENG 550 The Practice of Writing (3 credits)

An overview of the work of a practicing writer, with explorations of particular genres of interest to individual students in the course. Assignments may include a writer’s history (autobiographical account of interest in writing) and a writer’s apprenticeship (in-depth examination of a writer admired by the student).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 560 Rhetoric Then & Now (3 credits)

Consideration of the history of rhetoric, from the Sophists to the present day, with particular concern both for the ethical considerations involved in persuasive uses of language and for the stylistic choices in developing written work.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 600 Poetry Today (3 credits)

Exploration of the current poetry scene, particularly in America, reading collections from a wide variety of poetic schools and from the theoretical positions that inform the poems. Movements covered may include feminist and identity poetics, the New York School, poetry of witness, neo-confessional, Language Poetry, and the New Formalism. Use of imitation to experiment with difference poetic stances and styles.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 605 Readers/Writers inVictorianAge (3 credits)

ENG 610 What is an Author? (3 credits)

ENG 612 Writing from the Borders (3 credits)

This course will focus on reading and critiquing a number of important biographies, in order to see how various professional biographers have approached their task. Concomitantly, each student will be asked to choose a contemporary subject worthy of a biography (not a relative), who lives within a 50-mile radius of Philadelphia. Students will search out publications that often include biographical essays/profiles, gather detailed information about their subjects from various sources they determine to be important, and do the necessary interviews, with the aim of writing a biographical essay/profile.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 614 Lit Imagin:Arthurian Legend (3 credits)

This course focuses on reading and writing short stories with a particular focus on single-author contemporary and classic short story collections and their significance. Authors that maybe considered include Atwood, Diaz, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Lahiri, Munro, Millhauser, Poe, and Twain.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 615 Road to Revolution in 1960s (3 credits)

A study of the American cultural scene during the 1960s including how racial discrimination, gender discrimination, sexual repression and anti-war activism appeared in writing and culture. Writers may include: Jack Kerouac, Nikki Giovanni, Eldridge Cleaver, Kurt Vonnegut, Joseph Heller, Betty Freidan, and some Beat poets. Films were also consequential both in propelling and in reflecting revolutionary changes in American life through the 1960s. Several key films that may be considered include In the Heat of the Night, Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate, Easy Rider.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 616 Writing and Inciting (3 credits)

This course will explore how Irish novelists and short-story writers have represented "the Troubles"—a protracted period of politically motivated violence in Northern Ireland, Great Britain, and the Republic of Ireland, which began in the late 1960s and has not fully ended today. Key questions include the following: What is the role of the artist in representing politically motivated and other types of violence? Should artists offer solutions or only pose problems? What are the moral and aesthetical stakes involved in making art out of atrocity? How might studying the fiction of the Northern Irish "Troubles" provide students in the M.A. in Writing Studies with thematic, technical and ethical insights for their own artistic investigations of the many forms of violence within their own societies?

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 617 Writing and the Other Arts (3 credits)

Study of relationship between the work of writers and that produced by other kinds of creative people (in music, in architecture, in painting and drawing, in film) in order to get a full sense of any particular cultural moment (the Renaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, the Roaring 20’s, the Rebellious 60’s).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 618 Idea oftheBook:Codex-Hypertext (3 credits)

ENG 619 YngAdultLit ComingAgeNarrative (3 credits)

In this course we immerse ourselves in a range of contemporary literary texts written for, read by, assigned to, or kept from young adults (ages 12-18). Our goals will be to become both more familiar with the wide variety of texts geared toward adolescents and more attuned to our own experiences as readers and writers of young adult literature. At the same time, we will be attempting to think through the multiple ways in which adults (particularly parents and teachers) and adolescent readers interact with these texts and with each other.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 620 Special Topics in Lit/Culture (3 credits)

This course will consider a particular aspect of literature and culture relevant to contemporary writers. Content will vary according to the instructor. Course can be repeated when content varies.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 630 Composition Theory (3 credits)

Exploration of theories of composition, with particular emphasis on contributions to the field in the past half century.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 635 The Writing Teacher Writing (3 credits)

Consideration of the writing that teachers can do in order to develop their approach to the teaching of writing.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 636 Writing & Empowerment (3 credits)

ENG 638 Pedagogies Old & New (3 credits)

ENG 639 Writing & Cultural Conflict (3 credits)

ENG 640 Experiments in Narrative (3 credits)

Through examination of fictional and nonfiction narratives and narrative theories, this course considers such issues as the shift from oral to print to hypertext narratives, linear and nonlinear structure, writing "taboo" subjects, and the impact of social-cultural-historical circumstances upon narrative form and function. Content varies with instructor.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 641 RhetoricalTheory:SpecialTopics (3 credits)

Study of select issues in the domain of rhetoric, to be determined by the instructor.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 642 Style (3 credits)

ENG 643 Special Topics in Essay (3 credits)

An exploration of a particular topic related to the essay. Topics may include women essayists, personal essays, writing and memory, or other topics.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 646 Multi-Media Writing (3 credits)

The objective of this course is to widen our conceptions of storytelling to include sounds and images as well as words and broaden our understanding of how stories strengthen community. We will spend part of the class learning to use digital storytelling tools that the university will supply, but most of the course will be spent finding, making and critically evaluating stories. These stories will come from American Radioworks, The Moth, The BBC and other sources from around the world. wide range of considerations relative to the work of the writer presenting work through the World Wide Web.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

Attributes: English Area 2 - Medieval/Ren

ENG 665 Autobiography (3 credits)

Consideration of the writing that comes directly from life experience and development of an autobiographical narrative that reflects past achievements in this genre. Can satisfy Area I.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 668 Creative Nonfiction Workshop (3 credits)

Workshop course in creative nonfiction; several pieces of nonfiction will be prepared for submission. Can be repeated with the permission of the graduate director.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 669 Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

In-depth look into the concerns of a publishing poet. Students will hone their own work, putting together a final portfolio of polished writing, and will explore publication options including chapbooks and literary magazines. Toward this end, the class will include workshopping and one-on-one conferences with the instructor, as well as reading and responding to contemporary poetry, with attention to the practical concerns of the poet. Can be repeated with the permission of the graduate director.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 670 Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Workshop method of critique, with students expected to put together a portfolio of polished short stories. Published short stories will be read as models, and there will be discussion of strategies of getting fiction published. Content varies with the instructor. Fiction-writing workshop I can be taken either before or after Fiction writing workshop II. Can be repeated with the permission of the graduate director.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 671 Fiction Writing Workshop II (3 credits)

Workshop method of critique, with students expected to put together a portfolio of polished short stories or a short section of a novel or novella. Published short stories and novels will be read as models, and there will be discussion of strategies of getting fiction published in a variety of locations. Content varies with the instructor. Fiction-writing workshop II can be taken either before or after Fiction writing workshop I. Can be repeated with the permission of the graduate director.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 673 Screenwriting Workshop (3 credits)

Exploration of screenwriting in a workshop format with consideration of the whole process involved in development of screen projects.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 675 Special Topics Writing Wkshop (3 credits)

Exploration of a particular topic not covered in other writing workshops. Examples include "Playwriting," "Writing and Memory," "Writing through Race, Class, and Gender," "Food Writing," and "Nature Writing." Content varies according to instructor. Course may be repeated with permission of the graduate director.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 676 Writing for Publication (3 credits)

Successful freelance publishing begins with an awareness of what editors and their readers want. It demands knowledge of the manuscript market and familiarity with the requirements of specific publications: subject, length, organization, style. Unpublished writers can perfect their skills by analysis and imitation of authors who already write for the publications in which learners wish to appear. The course requires that assignments be composed—from the beginning—for specific publications and that completed work will be submitted for publication. Content can be fiction, nonfiction, or journalism and varies with the instructor. Can be repeated with the permission of the graduate director.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 677 Case Study:Public Relations (3 credits)

Comparative analysis of several public relations campaigns, with consideration of the rhetorical principles involved in the effort to sway public opinion.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 678 Case Study: MagazinePublishing (3 credits)

Exploration of magazine publishing, and the study of several magazines—their histories and editorial styles— with consideration for changing demographics and the practical considerations of achieving success in the magazine market. Consideration of the state of magazine publishing in both print and the web, and the development of articles from pitch to publication.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 679 Special Topics in Journalism (3 credits)

Exploration of a particular topic in journalism. May include sports journalism, literary journalism, or other topics as determined by the instructor.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 680 Writing the Grant Proposal (3 credits)

The course will explore various rhetorical strategies used to develop grant proposals and related writing such as the letter of inquiry, letter of intent, and mini-proposal. Students will examine and critique samples of actual grant-related submissions and practice developing relevant writing skills. Project budgeting will also be discussed and practiced. For their final project, students will be guided through selecting a non-profit organization; researching the organization's history, mission, needs and other background; and creating a professional-quality grant proposal that the non-profit could choose to submit.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 682 New Media (3 credits)

Exploration of new communications media as the hypertext world expands and technology continues to make possible increased broadcast media opportunities.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 683 Editing Practicum (3 credits)

Assignment to a specific, actual editing project, with expectation that the student will engage in several editorial functions in preparing manuscripts for publication.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 684 Health Writing (3 credits)

Are pharmaceutical makers influencing scientific research? What emerging infectious disease is likely to be the next big scare? What are the pros and cons of universal healthcare? Is chocolate really good for the heart? This course will teach students how to report and write on some of the pressing health issues of the day and encourage them to become more discerning consumers of medical news. Students will learn how to analyze research studies, conduct interviews of doctors, scientists and patients, and translate findings into lively and informative stories for the lay reader. The course will explore the connection between the environment and disease and examine trends in medicine as technology advances and funding shrinks. Students will get the latest information from guest speakers who are leaders in the fields of medical research, public relations and the media. This course will help prepare students for a career in health-related writing or sharpen their communication skills for whatever field they are pursuing.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 770 Directed Readings (3 credits)

ENG 771 Directed Research (3 credits)

ENG 772 Directed Writing (3 credits)

ENG 773 Directed Fieldwork (3 credits)

ENG 791 Graduate Internship (3 credits)

Students have workplace internship assignments in areas of career interest that involve writing (research, editing, writing). A component of the course will be research in the internship field, in addition to writing of various kinds about the actual internship activity, some of it done with an eye to publication. Each placement involves approximately 200 hours of work over the course of the internship, a letter from a supervisor upon completion of the internship, and a journal documenting the work of the internship

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in English or Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 793 Thesis Project I (3,6 credits)

The thesis project can involve either an analytical study in some area covered by the program or a collection of original creative material. Each project will have a faculty director, selected by the student in consultation with the Writing Studies Program Director. For a project to be completed in one registration period, register for ENG 793 and ENG 794, 3 credits each, for a total of 6 credits. For a project to be completed in two separate registration periods, register first for ENG 793 for 3 credits, then later, for ENG 794 for the remaining 3 credits. It is recommended that each project also be read by a second reader, who will be chosen by the student and thesis director, and approved by the graduate director. At the completion of the thesis project, students will make a formal presentation of it in one of three ways: (1) A public reading of a selected portion of the project, (2) A formal defense whereby the thesis will be explained and questions about it entertained, or (3) A public reading coupled with a formal defense. The method of public presentation would be agreed upon by the student and the thesis director. The English Department will host opportunities for public readings two or three times a year (in September, December, and May) close to expected completion of degree requirements and the thesis project. Once complete, thesis projects will receive a P (pass). In progress thesis projects will be graded as Incomplete. Nota Bene: The Writing Studies diploma will not be conferred until the candidate has successfully completed the above steps, as well as submitted the thesis project in the correct format for binding. Details about the procedure for binding the thesis can be found on the Writing Studies website.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Writing Studies. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENG 794 Thesis Project II (3 credits)