General Information

The provisions of this catalog describe programs and policies of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Erivan K. Haub School of Business and Professional and Liberal Studies and the Haub Degree Completion Program within Saint Joseph’s University as of time of publication. They are regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the University. The University reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time.

Saint Joseph’s University, a private liberal arts institution for men and women, founded by members of the Society of Jesus in 1851 and chartered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the following year, has been conducted ever since by the Jesuits as a Catholic educational institution in the Ignatian tradition.

Saint Joseph’s was recognized as a university by the Secretary of Education of the State of Pennsylvania on July 24, 1978. The corporate charter was formally changed to reflect university status on December 27, 1978.

Location

Situated on the western boundary of Philadelphia, Saint Joseph’s one hundred and fourteen acre campus combines accessibility to the city with the proximity to the Main Line. In this urban-suburban environment, students share in the educational, cultural, and entertainment resources of a great metropolitan area. Students, faculty and staff alike enjoy the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Pennsylvania Ballet, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Barnes Foundation, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Franklin Institute, the University Museum, the Free Library, theatre, world class dining and major league baseball, football, basketball, and hockey. The city itself is at once a museum of American history and culture and a laboratory for contemporary economics, sociology, politics and religion.

History

On the morning of September 15, 1851, some thirty young men gathered in the courtyard outside Saint Joseph’s Church, located in Willing’s Alley off Walnut and Fourth Streets and one block from Independence Hall. After attending High Mass and reciting the Veni Creator in the church, these young men were assigned to their classes in a building adjacent to the church. That September morning marked the beginning of a rich and exciting history for Saint Joseph’s University.

As far back as 1741, a Jesuit College in Philadelphia had been proposed and planned by Rev. Joseph Greaton, S.J., the first resident pastor of Saint Joseph’s Church. The suppression of the Jesuits (1773-1814) and lack of human and financial resources delayed for over a hundred years the realization of Fr. Greaton’s plans for a college. Credit for founding the college is given to Rev. Felix Barbelin, S.J., who served as its first president. He, along with four other Jesuits, formed the first faculty of Saint Joseph’s College. Before the end of the first academic year, the enrollment rose from fewer than forty to ninety-seven students. In the following year (1852), when the college received its charter of incorporation from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the enrollment grew to 126 students.

In January, 1856, Saint Joseph’s College moved to a more spacious site on the fashionable Filbert Street. Due to financial difficulties and the serious illness of the college’s second president, the college returned to its Willing’s Alley location in 1860. Shortly thereafter, the civil strife between the North and South became the first of many wars that would greatly diminish the college’s enrollment. Through the Civil War and post-bellum years, Saint Joseph’s College struggled to remain in existence.

With the purchase in 1866 of a city block between Seventeenth and Eighteenth Streets fronting on Stiles Street as a new site for the college, its future began to look brighter. Rev. Burchard Villiger, S.J., one of the original members of the college faculty, became its president in 1866. It was during his tenure that new college buildings, made possible largely through a generous bequest from the estate of Francis Anthony Drexel, were constructed on the Stiles Street location.

A sporadic but continuing growth, both in student enrollment and academic excellence, is recorded for the new life of Saint Joseph’s College from September 2, 1889, when the college moved from Willing’s Alley to Stiles street, until 1927, when a still larger campus was judged necessary.

In November 1922, an ambitious building fund campaign to raise $1,000,000 was organized by Rev. Matthew Fortier, S.J. His work in this difficult undertaking was successful and the pledges did exceed that goal, but the actual contributions did not. Subsequently, Saint Joseph’s College was able to purchase twenty-three acres in a beautiful residential area at the western edge of the city. Construction of a handsome building in modern Collegiate Gothic architectural style was begun in November 1925. Its dedication took place on November 14, 1927. From that time to the present, the location of Saint Joseph’s has been 54th and City Avenue.

During the Second World War, the college’s enrollment was again greatly reduced. Following the war, aided by the "G.I. Bill of Rights," enrollment grew rapidly. In 1943, an Evening College was founded. It was also after the war that Saint Joseph’s acquired several spacious homes adjacent to the campus, which were converted to its first residences for students.

Through the decade of the sixties, Saint Joseph’s experienced unprecedented physical growth. Five more properties were added to the campus including the nine-acre estate of Margaret Gest, a Jesuit faculty residence, the Post classroom building, a science center, the Drexel Library building, a six-story student dormitory and expansion of the Student Center. All enhanced the modern facilities of the campus.  In the fall of 1970, the undergraduate day college opened its doors to women, bringing to an end its tradition as an all-male institution. Saint Joseph’s was recognized as a university by the Secretary of Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on July 24, 1978. The corporate charter was formally changed to reflect university status on December 27, 1978. Shortly thereafter the University added a College of Business and Administration to complement the College of Arts and Sciences, and it also expanded graduate programs. At the same time, Saint Joseph’s built a new Student/Sports Recreation Complex. The need for a larger library prompted the expansion of the University’s Drexel Library into a Library/Learning Resources Center. The campus was enlarged to 49 acres with the purchase of Saint Mary’s and Bronstein halls.

The last decade has marked an era of significant change in student enrollment; development of new undergraduate and graduate programs in all three colleges; integration of state-of-the-art technology of every kind, in the classroom and throughout the campus; upgrading of science laboratories; hiring of new faculty; and new campus construction.

Among the most important building projects undertaken are the following:

  • the Chapel of St. Joseph;
  • the McShain Student Residence and its footbridge traversing City Avenue and linking the city and suburban campuses;
  • Mandeville Hall, home of the Erivan K. Haub School of Business;
  • three large new student residence halls and a parking garage;
  • and a new boathouse on Philadelphia’s famed Kelly Drive.

In the summer of 2005, the University agreed to purchase the Merion campus of neighboring Episcopal Academy. The acquisition added 38 acres containing 52 classrooms, eight laboratories, 113 offices, and 14.5 acres of playing fields. Subsequent to the announcement of the agreement, alumnus James J. Maguire ‘58 donated $10 million to help fund the purchase, and this section of the university is known as the Maguire Campus. Maguire’s gift was later matched by a donation of the same amount by Brian Duperreault ‘69; the two donations are the largest alumni gifts in Saint Joseph’s history.

External and peer review are also indicators of institutional progress and the awarding of a Phi Beta Kappa chapter to the university and AACSB accreditation in both business and accounting for the Haub School of Business augur well for the future of Saint Joseph’s.

Mission Statement

As Philadelphia’s Jesuit Catholic University, Saint Joseph’s University provides a rigorous, student-centered education rooted in the liberal arts. We prepare students for personal excellence, professional success, and engaged citizenship. Striving to be an inclusive and diverse community that educates and cares for the whole person, we encourage and model lifelong commitment to thinking critically, making ethical decisions, pursuing social justice, and finding God in all things.

Colleges and Schools

The University is organized as follows:

The College of Arts and Sciences which offers the traditional undergraduate programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a flexibly- structured program in Professional and Liberal Studies in the Arts and Sciences leading to bachelor and associate degrees, and graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science and Doctor of Education.

The Erivan K. Haub School of Business, which offers traditional undergraduate programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, a flexibly-structured Haub Degree Completion program leading to a bachelor degree or associate degree, and graduate programs leading to the degrees Master of Business Administration and Master of Science.

Accreditations, Approvals, and Memberships

Saint Joseph’s University is approved by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education:

Middle States Commission on Higher Education
3624 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
267-284-5000

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. The Haub School of Business and its Accounting program are accredited by the AACSB—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The Chemistry Department is on the approved list of the American Chemical Society. The Teacher Education program was granted Program Approved Status by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and is recognized by the New Jersey Department of Education for issuance of certificates.

The University is also a member of the American Council on Education, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, the National Catholic Educational Association, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, the Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities, the American Library Association, the Association of Liberal Arts Colleges of Pennsylvania for the Advancement of Teaching, the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, and the Middle Atlantic Association of Colleges of Business Administration. The Haub School of Business is also a member of Beta Gamma Sigma, the honor society of business programs accredited by AACSB International.

Student Disability Services

In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the Office of Student Disability Services coordinates support services and recommends reasonable academic adjustments based on appropriate documentation and the needs of the student. The Office is responsible for promoting access to facilities and programs, ensuring equal educational opportunities, acting as an information and referral source, and serving as a liaison between faculty and student.

The office of Student Disability Services is located in:

Bellarmine G10
610-660-1339
TTY 610-660-1620
sds@sju.edu
Visit the website: sju.edu/sds

Veterans Services

The SJU Office of Veterans Services is dedicated to serving the unique needs of our veterans, spouses and dependents. We are a nationally recognized “veteran friendly” university, as well as a full participant in the Post-9/11 GI Bill and Yellow Ribbon programs. Our mission is to create a welcoming environment for veterans and their families, and to ensure veterans gain access to all eligible federal, state and local programs and services. We are located in Mandeville Hall, Suite 206. Additional information is available on our website at www.sju.edu/veterans.

Non-Discrimination Policy

In compliance with applicable law and its own policy, Saint Joseph’s University is committed to recruiting and retaining a diverse student and employee population and does not discriminate in its admission of students, hiring of employees, or in the provision of its employment benefits to its employees and its educational programs, activities, benefits and services to its students, including but not limited to scholarship and loan programs, on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex/gender, marital status, ancestry, sexual orientation, medical condition, physical or mental disability, veteran status or any other basis prohibited by applicable law.

Questions or concerns regarding the University’s equal opportunity policies and programs should be directed to the University’s Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Officer, (610) 660-3336.

Notification with Regard to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998, and the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act.

As provided by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998, Saint Joseph’s University through its Department of Public Safety, annually provides notice and makes available copies of the Annual Security Report, to the campus community, prospective students, employees and the public. Each Security Report includes statistics for the past three years concerning crimes and incidents (whether they occurred on campus, in off-campus building and property owned or controlled by the University, or on public property adjacent to campus) reported to campus security authorities. Each Security Report also provides campus policies and practices concerning security – how to report sexual assaults and other crimes, crime prevention efforts, policies/laws governing alcohol and drugs, victims’ assistance programs, student discipline, university resources, and other matters. The Security Report, which also includes information about the Department of Public Safety and Security, is publicly available electronically or by hard copy in the following ways:

In addition, as provided by the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, the Philadelphia and Lower Merion Sheriffs’ Offices maintain a Megan’s Law database of sex crime offenders: http://www.pameganslaw.state.pa.us/

Confidentiality of Student Records

The University’s policy with respect to the confidentiality of and access to student records is in conformity with the relevant state and federal regulations.

The Family Right and Privacy Act of 1974 grants eligible students the right to inspect and review certain education records, and safeguards the student against improper or unauthorized disclosure of such education records or personally identifiable information contained therein.

A detailed statement of Saint Joseph’s policy, including a description of education records kept and the administrative officers responsible for them, a procedure for initiating inspection and review, and a procedure for challenging information in such records, is available from the Registrar’s Office.

Complaints with respect to this policy or its administration may be registered with:

Family Policy Compliance Office
United States Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-5901

Student Life

Committed to our Catholic Jesuit tradition and guided by our Ignatian values, we empower our students to create a supportive and transformative educational experience. We provide challenging opportunities for the holistic development of students so that they may become servant leaders who discern goals, focus on social justice, appreciate diversity and lead lives of faith and purpose. http://www.sju.edu/studentlife

Undergraduate Level Grades

The following system of grades, with their grade point equivalent in parenthesis, is used in all courses offered by the University:

A 4.0 Excellent performance in all or most aspects of the course
A- 3.7 Excellent performance in many aspects of the course
B+ 3.3 Very good performance in all or most aspects of the course
B 3.0 Good performance in all or most aspects of the course
B- 2.7 Good performance in many aspects of the course
C+ 2.3 Acceptable performance; more than adequate performance in some aspects of the course
C 2.0 Acceptable performance in all or most aspects of the course
C- 1.7 While acceptable overall, course performance is inadequate in one or more areas
D+ 1.3 While acceptable, course performance is inadequate in several areas
D 1.0 Meets minimal performance standards required for passing
F 0.0 Failure; overall performance has not met the basic standards of the course
P Pass No grade points. Credit. The grade P carries credit but is not included in the calculation of the grade point average.
NP No Penalty No grade points. No credit. The non-passing grade NP carries no credit and does not affect the calculation of the grade point average.
NG No Grade A grade that is only used by the University Registrar to indicate that no grade has been submitted by the instructor. Just as with an I or incomplete grade, this grade will automatically turn to an F grade, if it is not resolved within four weeks from the last day of the final examination period for the semester in question.
IP In Progress A temporary grade assigned to all students of a given course that extends meeting requirements beyond the grading period for a traditional semester. Other grades on the scale will be assigned by the appropriate faculty member at the conclusion of the given course or within 180 days from the initial issuance of the IP grade. At that point, the University Registrar is instructed to change all outstanding IP grades to F. Extensions may only be granted by the Dean of the college through which the course is offered.
W W Withdrawal
WA Administrative Withdrawal equivalent to W; given by the Dean of the college to which the student belongs in consultation with the University Registrar or with the Vice-President/Associate Provost of Student Life in selected involuntary cases, or both, following consideration of exceptional situations where a standard withdrawal from all courses is or was not possible. Students who must withdraw from the university after the end of the last day to withdraw should consult with their academic advisors for appropriate procedures, justification, and documentation to request an administrative withdrawal. Further, Administrative withdrawals are approved only in circumstances with sufficient documentation of impacted academic performance because of medical illness, death or critical illness of an immediate family member, or military service, or when it is deemed that the University can no longer provide education services to a given student (involuntary withdrawal). Administrative withdrawal petitions based upon extraordinary circumstances are only considered for all courses in a semester (not selected courses) and are only considered for courses in the calendar year immediately preceding the date of the petition. Petitions for withdrawal from a second successive semester based on the same circumstances will not be approved.
I Incomplete A temporary grade which may be assigned when a student has permission of the instructor to complete requirements within a short time after the end of the course. (This grade is not used when a student’s work is qualitatively deficient.) The I grade must normally be resolved within four weeks of the last day of the final examination period for the semester in question. I grades may not appear on a final record. At the end of the stated period unresolved incomplete grades become Failures. Extensions may be granted only by the Dean of the appropriate college.
X Audit No grade points. No credit.

Graduate Level Grades

The following system of grades, with their grade point equivalent in parenthesis, is used in all courses offered by the University:

A 4.0 Distinguished; exceptional performance in all aspects of the course
A- 3.7 Exceptional performance, but somewhat less than that rated as A
B+ 3.3 Very good; meritorious work; exceptional performance in several aspects of the course; notably above average expected of students
B 3.0 Good; sound performance in all aspects of a course; completely fulfilling and satisfying the requirements of the course
B- 2.7 Good performance in many aspects of the course
C+ 2.3 Acceptable performance; more than adequate performance in some aspects of the course
C 2.0 Passing; marginal work, acceptable, sound performance in some aspects of the course, but below the level of expected competence in other areas
F 0.0 Failure; not evidencing significant grasp of subject matter or techniques; failure remains on record even if course is repeated and the original grade still affects the cumulative average. No grade points. No credit. Failure remains on record and as part of GPA even if course is repeated
P Pass No grade points. Credit. The grade P carries credit but is not included in the calculation of the grade point average.
NP No Penalty No grade points. No credit. The non-passing grade NP carries no credit and does not affect the calculation of the grade point average.
NG No Grade A grade that is only used by the University Registrar to indicate that no grade has been submitted by the instructor. Just as with an I or incomplete grade, this grade will automatically turn to an F grade, if it is not resolved within four weeks from the last day of the final examination period for the semester in question.
IP In Progress A temporary grade assigned to all students of a given course that extends meeting requirements beyond the grading period for a traditional semester. Other grades on the scale will be assigned by the appropriate faculty member at the conclusion of the given course or within 180 days from the initial issuance of the IP grade. At that point, the University Registrar is instructed to change all outstanding IP grades to F. Extensions may only be granted by the Dean of the college through which the course is offered.
W W Withdrawal
WA Administrative Withdrawal equivalent to W; given by the Dean of the college to which the student belongs in consultation with the University Registrar or with the Vice-President/Associate Provost of Student Life in selected involuntary cases, or both, following consideration of exceptional situations where a standard withdrawal from all courses is or was not possible. Students who must withdraw from the university after the end of the last day to withdraw should consult with their academic advisors for appropriate procedures, justification, and documentation to request an administrative withdrawal. Further, Administrative withdrawals are approved only in circumstances with sufficient documentation of impacted academic performance because of medical illness, death or critical illness of an immediate family member, or military service, or when it is deemed that the University can no longer provide education services to a given student (involuntary withdrawal). Administrative withdrawal petitions based upon extraordinary circumstances are only considered for all courses in a semester (not selected courses) and are only considered for courses in the calendar year immediately preceding the date of the petition. Petitions for withdrawal from a second successive semester based on the same circumstances will not be approved.
I Incomplete A temporary grade which may be assigned when a student has permission of the instructor to complete requirements within a short time after the end of the course. (This grade is not used when a student’s work is qualitatively deficient.) The I grade must normally be resolved within four weeks of the last day of the final examination period for the semester in question. I grades may not appear on a final record. At the end of the stated period unresolved incomplete grades become Failures. Extensions may be granted only by the Dean of the appropriate college.
X Audit audit; see Audit Students

Pass/No Penalty

Certain courses, particularly those requiring completion of a specified assignment or attainment of a specified level of skill, may be designated as Pass/No Penalty courses. The grading basis must be established and publicized no later than the beginning of the registration period and must apply to all students in the course.  All such courses require the approval of the relevant department chair and the appropriate Dean.

Pass/No Penalty Course Grade Option (Undergraduate Level)

In order to encourage students to challenge their interests and limitations in areas outside their chosen field of study, the University has a Pass/No Penalty grade option for students. This provision allows students the ability to select certain courses in which they are registered to be taken on a Pass/No Penalty basis for grading. When a student opts for this basis in accord with established stipulations, the final grade will result in no effect on the student’s grade point average (GPA). However, credits earned will be awarded if a passing grade is attained. Also, a standard passing grade submitted by an instructor for such students will be converted to the grade of P on the student’s transcript and a failing grade will be converted to NP by the Registrar’s Office upon review of the final grades for the course in question. The description of these grades and their meaning and usage are described in the appropriate section.

Students may opt to take a course on this basis as long as the following conditions are met:

  • The course selected is a free elective, not counting in any way toward the student’s general education requirement (GER)/program (GEP), or prescribed major or minor program requirements.

  • Students are only permitted to take 2 (two) such courses under this option during their career at Saint Joseph’s, and no more than 1 (one) such course in a given semester.

  • The student and the course selected are on the undergraduate level and the student has attained junior or senior status at the university.

In addition to the above stipulations, students are required to submit their request to the Registrar’s Office (BL 106) by the conclusion of the add/drop period for that term. Once accepted by Registrar’s Office personnel, the student accepts responsibility for the course meeting the stated eligibility requirements. Upon submission of the request, the Pass/No Penalty option cannot be reversed. Questions regarding this option may be directed to the Registrar’s Office.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The grade point average is the ratio of the total grade points (sum of products of course credits and grade points for each course) earned at Saint Joseph’s University to the total credits attempted at Saint Joseph’s University (including grades of F but excluding grades of P, NP, I, IP, NG, X, and W). Only courses taken at Saint Joseph’s after matriculation are included in this calculation, even if transfer credit has been given.

Key to Course Codes

The following list identifies the abbreviations used for course areas. Where the area does not coincide with the name of the department or program, the department or program name is indicated in parentheses.

Code Description
ABA Applied Behavioral Analysis
ACC Accounting
ADM Public Administration (Political Science)
AER Aerospace Studies
ART Art
ASC Actuarial Science (Mathematics)
ASL American Sign Language (Modern and Classical Languages)
BIO Biology
BUS Business (Management/Marketing)
CHM Chemistry
CHN Chinese (Modern and Classical Languages)
CLA Classics (Modern and Classical Languages)
COM Communications Studies
CRJ Criminal Justice (Sociology)
CSC Computer Science
DSS Decision and System Sciences
ECE Early Childhood Education (Teacher Education)
ECN Economics
EDL Education Leadership
EDU Education
ENG English
ENV Environmental Science
ESL English as a Second Language (Modern and Classical Languages)
FBE Family Business Entrepreneurship
FIN Finance
FMK Food Marketing
FPL Financial Planning (Finance)
FRE French (Modern and Classical Language)
GEN Gender Studies
GRA Nurse Anesthesia (Graduate Health Services)
GRG Graduate Gerontology
GRK Greek (Modern and Classical Languages)
GRM German (Modern and Classical Languages)
HAD Health Administration (Health Services)
HCE Health Care Ethics
HED Health Education (Health Services)
HIS History
HON Honors Program
HSV Health Services
IBU International Business
IHS Interdisciplinary Health Services (Health Services)
INT Interdisciplinary Courses
IRT International Relations
IST Italian Studies (Modern and Classical Languages )
ITA Italian (Modern and Classical Languages)
ITS Instructional Technology (Teacher Education)
JPN Japanese (Modern and Classical Languages)
LAT Latin (Modern and Classical Languages)
LAW Legal Studies
LEO Leadership, Ethics & Organizational Sustainability
LIN Linguistics (Modern and Classical Languages)
LRN Learning Institute
LTT Literature in Translation (Modern and Classical Languages)
MAT Mathematics
MCC Modern and Classical Cultures (Modern and Classical Languages)
MED Mathematics Education (Mathematics)
MGT Management
MHC Managing Human Capital
MKT Marketing
MPE Pharmaceutical Marketing (Executive Program)
MTF Music, Theatre, & Film
ODL Organization Development & Leadership
PHL Philosophy
PHY Physics
PMK Pharmaceutical Marketing
POL Political Science
PSE Public Safety & Environmental Protection
PSY Psychology
PUR Purchasing/Acquisitions (Economics)
PWS Professional Writing and Speaking
REF Real Estate Finance
REL Religious Studies (Theology & Religious Studies)
RMI Risk Management & Insurance (Finance)
RUS Russian (Modern and Classical Languages)
SNL Sign Language (Modern and Classical Languages)
SOC Sociology
SPA Spanish (Modern and Classical Languages)
SPE Special Education
THE Theology (Theology & Religious Studies)

Course Numbering System

In 2009 the university governance system approved a mandate that alters the course catalog numbering system. The new coding structure calls for the following general outline for course numbering:

  • 100s: Courses that that are designed primarily for but not limited to first-year students or that otherwise are the first undergraduate courses in a sequence in a field of study.
  • 200s: Courses designed primarily for but not limited to sophomores.

  • 300s: Courses designed primarily for but not limited to juniors.

  • 400s: Courses designed primarily for but not limited to seniors.

  • 500s: Lower-level graduate courses.

  • 600s & 700s: Upper-level graduate courses.

  • 800s: Courses open only to doctoral students.

Undergraduate Course Numbers

At the undergraduate level, the following types of course offerings are available across many disciplines and the numbers across from them classify each group appropriately:

Freshmen Seminar (New GEP) 150 (satisfies GEP FYS requirement; special topics will be presented in most academic departments offering this course)
Cooperative Education 488, 489 & 490
Internship 490, 491
Special Topics 170, 270, 370 or 470 (can be repeated for credit, topic will vary when offered)
Independent Research 493, 494
Lab Courses Add an "L" to the end of the number of the course to which the lab corresponds wherever possible (e.g. CHM 101 & CHM 101L)
Capstone (only as required by some) 495
Transfer Courses without SJU equivalent 196 to 199, 296 to 299, 396 to 399, 496 to 499 (used for transfer articulation where course transferring in is not part of the SJU catalog of offerings)

Course numbers for remaining courses are left to the department’s discretion. Some additional notes about certain undergraduate course types and offerings:

Independent Study: Special topic independent study courses can be offered using the Special Topics numbers outlined above. An independent study for an existing course can use the existing number. There is no need for special independent study numbers.

Graduate (Masters Coursework)

Due to the large numbers of graduate catalog entries in certain areas of the university, it has been determined that graduate course numbers will follow this convention which is a modification of that approved by academic governance:

  1. 500s: Lower-level graduate courses.

  2. 600s & 700s: Upper-level graduate courses.

  3. 800s: Courses open only to doctoral students.

Curriculum at the graduate level is typically divided along the lines of foundation, core, and major or specialization coursework. Some programs have a thesis/research course, some do not. Some programs have a capstone course, some do not. These items are defined as follows:

Foundation: that part of a graduate program that may be waived given a student’s prior undergraduate or graduate education. Waivers are granted at the time of admission to a given program. Transfer credit is not awarded for Foundation courses. Foundation courses cover fundamental concepts to the specific discipline. Foundation courses are not counted in the minimum credits needed to graduate.

Core: that part of a graduate program required of all students pursuing the degree. Core courses provide additional depth beyond foundation work for fundamental concepts in the specific discipline.

Major/Specialization: that part of a graduate program that allows the development of expertise in a specific area of interest.

Thesis/Research: a course designed to allow the student to pursue independent research with a faculty member in a specific area of interest within the discipline. Often, it serves as a prelude to doctoral study.

Capstone: a course that serves as the culmination of the academic program, pulling together concepts from across the entire discipline.

At the graduate level, the following numbers are proposed to classify each group and selected other course types appropriately:

Foundation 500 to 549
Core 550 to 599
Major/Specialization 600 to 785
Special Topics 770
Internship 791 & 792
Thesis/Research 793 & 794
Capstone 795
Lab Courses Add an "L" to the end of the number of the course to which the lab corresponds wherever possible (e.g. BIO 500L)
Transfer Courses without SJU equivalent 796 to 799 (graduate programs have transfer credit limitations; numbers are not used for regular SJU offerings)

Some additional notes about certain course types and offerings:

Independent Study: Special topic independent study courses can be offered using the Special Topics numbers outlined above. An independent study for an existing course can use the existing number. There is no need for special independent study numbers.

Graduation Requirement: Pennsylvania Department of Education regulations stipulate that a master’s degree must be comprised of a minimum of 30 credits. Certain SJU programs have a minimum of more than 30. Commonly accepted academic protocol indicates that Foundation courses are not part of the announced minimum number of credits required to graduate. Foundation courses, if required, add to the student’s number of credits required to graduate.

Section Naming Conventions

In order to readily identify different types of offerings, the following conventions be used when naming certain sections.

Section Type Naming Convention Example
Undergrad Day Program starts with "D" "D01", "D02", etc.
Prof. & Liberal Studies starts with "P" "P01", "P02", etc.
Graduate/Doctoral Programs starts with "G" "G01", "G02", etc.
Off-Campus Sections starts with "X" "XUR" - Ursinus, ”XEN" - Einstein, ”XSD" - Southeast Delco, N. B - Additional site abbreviations will be made by Registrar personnel as the schedule develops -- the codes will be on our website
Independent Study Sections starts with "IS" "IS1", "IS2", etc.
Honors starts with "HN" "HN1", "HN2", etc.
On-Line starts with "OL" as above
Hybrid starts with "HY" as above
Service Learning starts with "SL" as above

N.B. -- Additional abbreviations will be made as the schedule develops and will be posted comprehensively on the Registrar's Office webpage.