Political Science (POL)

POL 101 Intro Amer Govt & Pol (Fr Sem) (3 credits)

POL 103 Intro:Comparative Pol (Fr Sem) (3 credits)

POL 105 Intro:Internatnl Pol (Fr Sem) (3 credits)

POL 107 Intro:Polit Thought (Fr Sem) (3 credits)

POL 111 Intro to American Politics (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to American political processes and institutions. The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the theory and practice of American government. Students will learn about the basic structure, function, and dynamics of American government and the political system within the context of the major political issues of our time. Beyond studying the institutional structures and activities of government, we will also evaluate the relationships between individuals, groups, and institutions in terms of influence, process, and outputs in various domains. Depending on instructor, satisfies the Diversity overlay requirement.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 113 Intro to Comparative Politics (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of comparative political systems, this course focuses attention on the institutions and political cultures of select countries from different world regions. While exploring the varieties of democracy and authoritarianisms, as well as the complexity of democratizing today, this course also introduces students to the comparative method. Satisfies the Globalization overlay requirement.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 115 Introduction to Global Politcs (3 credits)

This course is an introductory survey of the major approaches (Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism), interpretations and problems in the field of Global Politics, with a heavy emphasis on current events. Topics include security (war, peace, terrorism), international political economy (hegemony, development, globalization), and trans boundary issues (migration, human rights). Satisfies the Globalization overlay requirement.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 117 Intro to Political Thought (3 credits)

When is it justified to overthrow a tyrant? Do men and women have different virtues? Are markets just? Political theorists ask questions about justice, equality, law, property, community, and duty. This course examines questions that affect today’s political world by examining the foundations of political thought - Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Adam Smith, Madison, Rousseau, Marx – as well as contemporary theorists such as Foucault, and feminist Wendy Brown.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 122 Law and Public Policy (3 credits)

POL 150 First-Year Seminar (3 credits)

POL 170 Special Topics: Political Sci (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, this courses will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., The Presidential Election, The Arab Spring, Guns and the Supreme Court). Does not count for major credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 191 Washington Leadership Seminar (3 credits)

Students who attend The Washington Center (TWC) take a leadership seminar through TWC. This course is an elective; it does not count for POL major or minor credit.

POL 192 Washington Internship (3 credits)

Students who attend The Washington Center (TWC) for a normal academic semester (fall or spring) perform a 30-35 hour a week internship. The Department grants students two upper division courses (6 credits) for the internship (see POL 411-412 below) and also this third elective course for these internship hours. This course is an elective; it does not count for POL major or minor credit.

POL 193 Washington Center Elective (3 credits)

Students who attend The Washington Center (TWC) take one evening course at the Center in addition to performing their internship and participating in the leadership seminar. If this course is in Political Science, we transfer it back as POL 193. This course is an elective; it does not count for major or minor POL credit. Students may take a course in another discipline to count for minor or double major credit, according to that Department’s/Program’s rules.

POL 201 Soph Sem:Law and Social Change (3 credits)

What are the advantages and limits of using the law to affect social change? We use cases and case studies to examine the relationship between law and society. This course focuses on problems of implementation, the actual benefits received by affected parties, and the relationship between the federal government, the states, and public opinion. Case studies include: school integration, abortion, pay equity, death penalty, and single-sex unions. This course features a moot court and is for POL majors only (with special exceptions for minors). Majors typically take this class (or its sibling – POL 231) during their spring sophomore semester. Pre- or concurrent requisites: POL 111 or 117. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement and is an approved American Studies and Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Prerequisites: POL 111 (may be taken concurrently) and ENG 101

Restrictions: Students cannot enroll who have a major in International Relations.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 231 Soph Sem: 1989/2011 (3 credits)

Students will study two years of enormous upheaval – 1989 and 2011 with a focus on their aftermaths – to understand political transformation as a process. In addition to this substantive focus, students will also learn about the logic and methods of social science inquiry and how to write a research paper for Political Science (and International Relations). Pre- or concurrent requisites: POL 113. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and (POL 111 and POL 113) or (POL 111 and POL 115) or (POL 111 and POL 117) or (POL 113 and POL 115) or (POL 113 and POL 117) or (POL 115 and POL 117)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 270 Special Topics (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, this courses will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., The Presidential Election, The Arab Spring, Guns and the Supreme Court). Students may count only two POLs 270 and/or 370 courses for major or minor credit.

Attributes: GEP Social Science

POL 301 Law and Social Change (3 credits)

Brown v. Board of Education is heralded as a great success. A disenfranchised minority turned to the courts when the legislature and executive failed to respond. To what extent has this approach been successful? Since Brown, other, groups have turned to the courts as an authority when they believe they are disadvantaged by the larger political system. Should the courts play a role in social change? What should it look like? Case studies will include: school integration in the 1960s, birth control and abortion, gun rights, capital punishment or juvenile life without parole, and marriage equality. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement. This is an American Studies and an approved Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 302 Democratic Theory (3 credits)

Machiavelli – the first political realist – challenged the world to look at politics "as it is" rather than "as it ought to be." He asserted that rulers needed virtue – literally "manliness" – rather than Christian virtue or morality. This course investigates how Machiavelli’s ideas challenged (and threatened!) those of the Reformation and the Jesuits – and affected democratic and liberal theorists as they sought to reinvent the world. The course examines the political thought of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau Wollstonecraft, Mill, Marx, and Rawls – as well as 20th and 21st century writers who continue to debate the nature of politics, gender, and political leadership. It includes a simulation of Rousseau’s General Will and Rawls’s Original position.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 303 American Political Thought (3 credits)

Why did Ben Franklin say that the Swedes were “blackening” the colonies? Why did Lincoln change his mind about slavery? The course examines classic texts (for example, the American Revolution, the constitutional convention, Lincoln-Douglas debates) by linking them to other important intellectual and political movements in American thought (for example, white —women’s suffrage, the 20th century civil rights movements). The course examines the changing political vocabulary in American politics – and the expansion of rights to men, laborers, women, racial minorities, and LGBT people. This is an American Studies course.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 305 Politics, Ideology, & Film (3 credits)

How do ideologies -- bodies of thought -- affect individuals, social movements, nations, institutions, and groups? This course examines ideologies like fascism, communism, racism, colonialism, capitalism. We use films and primary documents from Europe, Asia, Latin America, Russia, and the United States to place each ideology in historical, political, and/or economic context. Students are expected to master the complexities of the ideologies in historical context as well as evaluate ideologies that have shaped national and international politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Classic articles in the social sciences and humanities help students explore popular responsibility for the actions of a leader (are the German people responsible for Hitler’s atrocities?), torture (is it ever ethical to torture someone for information?), and capital punishment (are there conditions when it is acceptable for the state to end a life?). Pre-requisite: PHL 154. Satisfies the Ethics Intensive overlay requirement. This is a Political Science and an International Relations course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 308 American Political Institution (3 credits)

In this course, students will study some of the most important claims, findings, and readings in the field of American political institutions, policy, and politics. Paying particular attention to the key scholarly questions, debates, and research on the major institutional actors in American politics, students will study a range of topics and analyze specific institutions in American politics such as the branches of government, the bureaucracy, political parties, the media, and interest groups. Along with learning about the important theoretical and empirical questions that guide the study of American institutions, students will also examine the ways in which the public exerts influence on, and is influenced by, these institutions. The overall goal of the course is to provide insight into how the study of political institutions broadens our understanding of politics, power, and democracy.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 309 Advising the Presidency (3 credits)

What makes a president “great?” What is leadership? Why do some presidents succeed and others fail? This course offers an analysis of the contemporary American Presidency with emphasis on the use of power, the role of personality, the nature of decision-making, and the relationship with the media, interest groups, and public opinion. We will investigate how presidents decide their policy priorities; what factors affect presidents’ public standing; what conditions shape the president’s relationship with Congress; and so on. Having carefully studied the presidency from the above perspectives, we will bring our informed insights to bear on two important questions confronting current and future presidents: race and gender. While the topic of the course is the presidency in general, the secondary goal of the class is to introduce and critically analyze how race and gender shape the ideas we have about our nation’s highest office. This is traditionally offered as a Winter Intersession course and is a Gender Studies course.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 310 Constitutional Politics (3 credits)

From the time the Constitution was ratified, the three branches of American government (legislative, executive, and judiciary) have competed for control over American policy and law. The Supreme Court is – on the one hand – extremely powerful because it can declare an act of either the legislature or executive unconstitutional (judicial review). Yet the Court lacks any power to enforce its decisions and it relies on the other branches to enforce its decisions (for example, President Eisenhower bringing in the military to uphold the desegregation of schools). Through the reading of cases and the viewing of documentaries, this course explores how the Supreme Court has shaped American politics for over two centuries. Topics include free speech in wartime, internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, desegregation, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage. This is an approved American Studies and Justice and Ethics in the Law course. Not for major credit.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 311 Const Law:Rights & Civil Lib (3 credits)

A study of contemporary issues of civil rights and liberties in the United States through classic Supreme Court decisions. Issues addressed include freedom of speech, press, and association, racial and gender discrimination and the issue of fundamental rights, including the right of privacy. Students read cases and learn to brief cases. The course highlight is a simulation of two Supreme Court cases. Students read and research to portray justices and attorneys in the two moot court simulations. This is an approved American Studies and Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 312 Social Controversy & Sup Court (3 credits)

Americans look to the Supreme Court to rule on moral and social issues like capital punishment and abortion. Why do citizens rely on nine unelected judges to define their rights in a democracy? This class analyzes how the Supreme Court has, over time, changed American law in two controversial rights: gun ownership and marriage equality. The class begins by considering the judiciary in our constitutional democracy then turns to the two case studies. The Supreme Court decided four marriage cases in June of 2015 and the course integrates these new rulings. Students will examine documents from the Founding (e.g. the Federalist Papers), read modern accounts of both gun and marriage cases, and learn to read and brief Supreme Court decisions. This is an approved American Studies and Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 313 Public Policy (3 credits)

This course investigates public policymaking within the United States with an emphasis on the social construction of public policy. Students will assess the significance of social, economic, and political factors that influence policymaking and implementation; how problems become a part of the political agenda; and the major political ideological perspectives in the U.S. that impact policy process and content. The course is a study of policy in practice, as students will evaluate current social problems along with empirical social science research to determine the strengths and weaknesses as well as the intended and unintended effects of a particular social policy at the state and/or national level.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 314 Public Administration (3 credits)

Essentially a survey of the principles and problems of modern governmental administration, this course concentrates on the theory of administration; the making and execution of public policy; relationships among the executive, legislature, bureaucracy, and public; structure and functions of sound administrative organization; personnel, budgeting, and other special problems; controversial issues of administration in a democratic society; as well as current trends in the theory and practice of American public Administration.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 315 Government and Business (3 credits)

POL 316 State and Local Government (3 credits)

This course focuses on gaining an understanding of the state and local tiers in our nation's three-tiered federal system. The organization of the course will explore the key elements of the federal system along with important characteristics of the institutional components that make up state and local government, e.g. the executive, legislative and judicial branches. The course will also examine the political forces that energize state and local governments such as voters, parties, and interest groups. The very important matter of budgeting will be addressed as well. Finally, public policy issues of particular concern to state and local governments will be assessed. To assist in understanding state and local government issues, several guest speakers will address the class and add their insights. We will conduct several focus groups during the semester to discuss relevant issues and devote some attention to polling in the current political atmosphere.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 317 Urban Politics (3 credits)

This course will explore urban politics in the U.S., first through an examination of the history of U.S. urban governance structures, namely machine politics and Progressive Era reform politics. As a bridge between the early era of city governance and contemporary urban life, we will examine the impact of suburbanization on the city. Our second segment will study and critique different ways of understanding urban power and governance, namely regime theory, privatism, managerialism, populism and progressivism. The third segment of the course will examine contemporary elements of the “urban crisis”, among them class, race and inequality. To highlight some of these issues, the final two weeks will be spent examining urban, public education as a policy arena where all three parts of the course will be placed in conversation.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 318 Pennsylvania Politics (3 credits)

This course is a study of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, its recent history, its politics, and the way its government is conducted. The course will have distinct, but overlapping emphases: The Political Environment: What are the political forces driving the agenda in this state? The issues: What are the issues that actually matter in this state? The Structure: How do the Governor's Office, the General Assembly, other statewide offices, and other departments of state government actually work? To assist in learning about these matters, several experienced and knowledgeable guest speakers will address the class. In addition, at various points in the semester, the class will be formed into a focus group to discuss various issues confronting the state.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 319 Media & Politics (3 credits)

News media has a profound influence on U.S. politics and policy, and this course investigates the interaction among the media, politicians, and citizens, with an emphasis on the ways in which news media shape everything we “know” about politics. Through an examination of a variety of media platforms—newspapers, television, campaign advertising, and social media—we will examine the media’s roles and responsibilities in American politics and learn how citizens respond to the media’s coverage of politics, politicians, and public policy. Do the media help us fulfill our obligation to be ‘good citizens’ within our democratic community? Do politicians, the media, and our political institutions promote or obstruct our efforts to be good citizens? In this course, we will address these questions with the goal of developing a thorough understanding of the relationship between citizens, the media, and politicians in a rapidly changing media age.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 320 Injustice & the Law (3 credits)

Fifty years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which eliminated most forms of de jure discrimination, we are still witnessing the lingering effects of de facto inequality within American society. To be sure, the CRA of 1964 and its subsequent amendments eliminated the use of discriminatory practices in housing, employment, business, and education. But overcoming de facto inequality has been harder to accomplish. What explains the gap between established legal doctrine and the reality of many Americans of color? The goal of the course is for students to study the potential and limits of law as a tool for social justice, as well as the role of law in the creation and maintenance of systems of racial injustice. Primarily through the lens of race, students will examine the empirical realities of laws and policies that were ostensibly passed to overcome injustice, broadly defined, as well as the sociopolitical causes and consequences of de facto racial segregation in American society. This is an approved Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Honors Course, Undergraduate

POL 321 Religion and American Politics (3 credits)

What is the relationship between religion and political life in the United States? How does religion influence major dimensions of politics, public policy, and mass participation? Should citizens and policymakers in the U.S. base their political opinions on their religious beliefs? In this course, students will investigate the place of religion in American political life and discuss how religion informs contemporary politics. The principal aim is for students to understand how religion affects politics, and vice versa, and to develop a greater understanding of the vitality and variability of religion as a factor in American public life.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Undergraduate

POL 322 Campaigns & Elections (3 credits)

The Campaigns and Elections course is an examination of modern American political campaigns, with a focus on the dramatic changes that have occurred in electoral politics in recent years. The course will have three distinct, but overlapping emphases: 1. The Strategic Campaign: How are campaigns carried on and managed? How should they be? What are the new technologies that have so drastically changed the nature of political campaigns? 2. Voting Behavior; what are the deep and fundamental changes that have occurred in voting behaviors and attitudes in recent years? What are the implications of these changes for the electoral process? 3. The Media and Campaigns: How do the media influence campaigns and electoral outcomes? What are the implications of the pervasive relationship between politics and the mass media? To assist in learning about the real world of politics, several guest speakers with considerable experience in political campaigns will address the class. In addition, at various points during the semester, the class will be formed into a focus group to discuss various campaign-related issues.

POL 323 Women and American Politics (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a critical examination of women as political actors in the United States. We will analyze various forms of women's political participation, both in the traditional spheres of what is considered politics -- women as voters and politicians -- and also in more "non-traditional" spheres of political activism. We will examine how women are mobilized to participate in politics, focusing keenly on the differences among women in their political activism in an effort to understand how the intersection of gender, race, class, sexuality, age, and ability influence women's political activism. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in the women and politics scholarship, mainly from a U.S. perspective. Students will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts scholars have developed as tools for thinking about the gendered political experience. In this course you will learn to "read" and analyze gender politically, exploring how it impacts our understanding of the political world. Satisfies the Diversity overlay requirement and is a Gender Studies course.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Gender Studies Course, GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 324 Race & Ethnic Politics in U.S. (3 credits)

From its first days, the United States has faced the dilemma of how to incorporate populations different from the majority population into the polity. This dilemma continues today and appears in discussions of such issues as affirmative action, immigration and naturalization, language policy, and social welfare policy. In this course, we will examine the major theories that attempt to explain the roles of race and ethnicity in U.S. politics and the ways in which individuals use race and ethnicity as resources for political organization. We will examine the phenomenon of ethnicity and race in the political development of the United States. Finally, we will look at the political attitudes and behaviors of ethnic and racial populations in order to measure their contemporary political influence. Among the topics to be covered include the meaning of race and ethnicity, the history of racial and immigration politics, prejudice, group participation and mobilization, political representation, and public opinion. Satisfies the Diversity overlay requirement.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, Diversity Course (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 325 Contemp Am Social Movements (3 credits)

Social movements are considered as one of the motivating forces behind political, social, and cultural change and are often credited for fundamentally reshaping societal institutions. This course examines the contemporary social movements that have occurred since the mid-1960s, commonly defined as the “New Social Movements” (NSMs). This course will explore several of these movements and examine where, when, why, and how the movements emerged. Students will also analyze what made certain movements more successful than others.

POL 326 Protesting Inequality (3 credits)

Through the lens of political science, this course examines the political causes and consequences of inequality in the United States and how citizens have responded to the empirical realities of unequal circumstances. While inequality is an economically, politically, socially, and morally complex phenomenon, this course emphasizes that inequality does not “just happen” but rather is a result of the way our society is structured. Nevertheless, citizens—agents—have protested inequality on various occasions and in many different ways. It is on these citizen protest movements that we will focus most of our attention, including, but not limited to, the “Poor People’s Movements” of the 1960s, the Welfare Rights Movement in the 1990s, and the Occupy Movement of the 2010s. This is an approved Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 327 Environmental Politics in Am (3 credits)

In order to understand today’s controversies over fracking and global warming, this course examines the rise of environmentalism in America, moving from the progressive conservationism of Teddy Roosevelt through the environmentalism of Earth Day and the 1970’s to the present era. The course uses recent works in political science to establish the actors in environmental decision-making and implementation as we consider federalism and state environmental policy, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, markets and free trade, the Presidency, Congress, the Bureaucracy, and the Courts. The focus of all student work is current – unresolved – policy problems at the local, state, and national levels. One of the course highlights is a policy simulation.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 328 Politics of U.S. Immigration (3 credits)

In this course, students will critically engage with the politics of immigration in the United States. While the national narrative broadly celebrates the arrival and incorporation of newcomers, these processes have been highly contested and problematic both in popular discourse and public policy since the country’s founding. The question of ‘who immigrates’ has been, and continues to be, shaped by decisions on how to manage geopolitical and geoeconomic forces, domestic political, economic and social preferences, popular sentiment and humanitarian considerations. Furthermore, understanding how immigrants integrate in society necessarily involves examining ‘difference’ on a number of axes, including race and ethnicity, language and culture, religion, gender, socioeconomic and educational levels, and legal status. This course provides students with the opportunity to explore key aspects of the discourse and reality of immigration to the U.S., including the American Dream, assimilation, ethnic neighborhoods, transnationalism, borders and security by considering the values, interests and roles of actors at all levels, including civil society organizations, national and sub-national governments, communities, households and individuals in the continuous re-making of the U.S. as a nation of immigrants.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 329 Suburban Govt & Problems (3 credits)

POL 331 Latin American Politics (3 credits)

This course addresses the political, economic and social development of modern Latin America. It examines the transformation of traditional authority structures, efforts to promote economic development, and concerns for the consolidation of democracy, adjustment to globalization, and U.S.-Latin American relations. Satisfies the Non-Western overlay requirement and is a Latin American Studies Course.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, International Relations Course, Latin American Studies Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 332 Politics of Japan (3 credits)

POL 333 Asian Democ at the Crossroads (3 credits)

This course will examine and discuss the political dynamics and policy behaviors of three successful democracies in Northeast Asia: Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. While all three countries are successful democracies with economic power, each country also faces a series of critical challenges in their politics, economy, and society. The global implications of their struggles are never trivial and the examination of three countries will provide us with the better grasp of contemporary global issues. The thematic focus of the course lies in the comparative analysis of each country in terms of political system, political economy, state-society relations, and foreign relations. To this end, the course will also explore the intricacies of the cultural, historical, and psychological contexts in which behavioral and policy motivations may be explained. Satisfies the Non-Western overlay requirement and is an Asian Studies course.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 334 Russian Politics (3 credits)

In 1917, the USSR was born out of the ashes of the Russian empire, and in 1991, it died. Since the Soviet Union disintegrated, Russia has struggled to develop a new national identity, a healthy economy, a well-functioning polity, an efficacious state, and a new orientation in world affairs. This course investigates the significance of the Soviet legacy for the contemporary political situation in Russia and evaluates the impact of new forces unleashed since the end of the communist era. In learning about the USSR and developments in today’s Russia, the class applies some of comparative politics’ “big concepts:” revolution, the state, the nation, federalism, totalitarianism, authoritarianism, and democracy.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 335 Comp Pols of MENA (3 credits)

This course serves as an introduction to the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. This region comprises 24 countries (or more depending on who is counting!) and spans three continents. Historically it has produced all three of the world's major monotheistic faiths and served as the battleground of kings and crusaders. Currently it is home to nation states, transnational movements, and several on-going conflicts. This course will explore the political system, political economy, and societal components of several countries in the region as a starting point to challenge broader themes of nationalism, territoriality, and political power.

Attributes: Africana Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 336 The EU and European Politics (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a hands-on opportunity for learning about the politics of the European Union and its member states. As an organization that is both supranational and intergovernmental in nature, the EU’s actions are subject to the actions within its institutions and the decisions of its members. Therefore European politics has a great impact on what the Union does. The key and (unique) learning tools in this course are three simulations of EU institutions –the EU Parliament, the Councils of the EU, and the European Council. Students will take on roles of actual EU politicians and engage in policy making. The simulations will require students to perform extensive outside research to prepare to play their roles and will give participants an excellent understanding of these institutions and how they work. Class members will also become expert in the politics of “their” countries (the countries from which their alter egos are from) as well as on the issue under consideration (which will vary depending on pressing European and world events).

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 337 Contemp Cuban Politi, Std Tour (3 credits)

The Cuban revolution is one of the seminal events of Latin American twentieth century history. This course provides the tools to understand the forces that gave rise to the revolution, how 'the Revolution' has evolved over the more than five and a half decades since the Castro government has been in power, and how Cuban society has transformed – politically, economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus is placed on Cuba since the demise of the Soviet Union, the so called "Special Period," in which Cuba transitioned from a 2nd World client state into an isolated underdeveloped country. Political reforms since then have contributed to an aperture toward the outside world, as well as to steps towards greater economic freedom for Cubans. Many other topics, including race, gender, the arts, Cuba's foreign relations with the U.S. and the rest of the world, citizenship, religion, health care and Cuba's future, will be discussed as well. This course satisfies the Non- Western overlay requirement and is a Latin American Studies and Africana Studies course.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP)

POL 338 Democracy:Perspect. from Rome (3 credits)

This class offers is an introduction to democratic political processes and institutions by using Rome as a case study. Students will learn about politics and political change in modern Italy; about the structure, function, and dynamics of government and the political system; about the political theories and events that affect the current political climate; and about how citizens participate through these structures. We will first read a few classics on democracy and the democratic tradition to establish a foundation of theoretical reasoning before moving on to an examination of the empirical evidence of how the system of politics functions in Italy. An added, comparative function of this course will be a correlation of political institutions in the United States, urging students to reflect upon their own political environment.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP)

POL 339 Dictatorship, Asian Style (3 credits)

This course will examine and discuss the political dynamics and policy behaviors of two authoritarian communist regimes in East Asia: China and North Korea. What are the natures of Chinese and North Korean societies? What are the guiding principles and norms in their political systems? What are the historical as well as contemporary implications of their economic systems? To this end, this course will explore the intricacies of the cultural, historical, and psychological contexts in which behavioral and policy motivations could be explained. Along with the comparative analysis of each country (political system, political economy, state-society relations, and foreign relations), major contemporary issues and challenges will be also examined. Can Chinese Communist Party keep its authoritarian grip on its people forever? Will China ever be democratized? Has China’s long economic boom ended? What are the mechanisms behind North Korea’s tight and cruel control of its citizens and their devotion to the Kim dynasty? Can North Korea enter and survive the global economy? More fundamentally, where is China heading? What does North Korea want? Satisfies the Non-Western overlay requirement and is an Asian Studies course.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 340 Political Geography (3 credits)

Political Geography is a course of political and spatial inquiry; it helps students compare and contrast people, places, and processes around the world. This course explores how spatial phenomena including physical geography, borders, and nation-states affect social and political phenomena including domestic, regional and global governance, differences and dynamics of power, and identity, and vice versa. Furthermore, Political Geography focuses on 'scale' - personal, local, regional, national, and global - to understand and explain patterns and processes, as well as conflict and cooperation in international affairs.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 341 Revolts and Revolutions (3 credits)

Why do revolts against governments deemed illegitimate occur and when do they become full-fledged revolutions? This course explores both the causes of uprisings and the conditions under which they succeed in bringing about new political and social orders by examining (1) what happened in the “great” revolutions, (2) how scholars have accounted for them, and (3)examining more recent instances of revolts which have sometimes failed and others succeeded. In this study, students will develop their writing and research skills, having the opportunity to find various types of information, write different forms of essays, and appropriately cite and present their materials. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 342 Nationalism (3 credits)

POL 350 Memory & Recon. in Global Soci (3 credits)

War apologies abound. Since the end of the Cold War, what we have been witnessing is a world-wide surge in memory. We are living in the era where collective apologies have become more and more common, and, as in Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka, to reconcile with the past has become critical part of contemporary politics of memory and regret. More concretely, this course will explore the following questions: Can a state apologize? Can the current generations apologize for the past wrongs and /or feel responsible? Or, should they? How do individuals articulate the link between identification with the state (and national pride) and sense of individual responsibility? How do individuals get their information about past wrongs? How much confidence do they have in the various sources (textbooks, mass media, internet, friends and family, etc.) at their disposal? Is reconciliation possible? Can memories go beyond national borders? Can it be something universal? The course will start with the introduction and examination of the role of history and memory in the (re-) formation of communal identity and explores for the possibility of communal reconciliation with past wrongs. Along with the examination of conceptual frameworks such as engagement and denial/avoidance, the ethical dimensions of political reconciliation will be discussed in terms of (1) retributive justice and (2) restorative justice. Satisfies the Diversity and Ethics Intensive overlay requirements and is an Asian Studies course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 351 International Human Rights (3 credits)

The tension between sovereignty and the promotion and protection of human rights remains one of the primary issues in contemporary global politics. This course focuses upon human rights, their status as international law, and the major issues in the implementation and enforcement of that law. The course will open with an overview of the philosophy of human rights, followed by discussion of the history of human rights, the international law of human rights, and the role of human rights in foreign policy. Throughout, students will study various mechanisms for the promotion, protection, and implementation of international human rights, including those of international organizations such as the United Nations, and those of non- governmental organizations such as Amnesty International. Whenever possible, the discussion of legal issues will relate to contemporary developments in human rights, and to issues of US foreign policy involving considerations of human rights. An additional focus will be on the human rights implications of globalization.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 352 Global Political Economy (3 credits)

Global economic relations are international, political and complex; they involve cross border flows of goods, money, services and people, and they reflect and create power. This course focuses on the nature and impact of the movement of goods (trade), capital (money, foreign direct investment, bailouts), services (call centers), people (migration), and even "bads" (pollution and disease) to understand the challenges of and opportunities for development, globalization and international cooperation in today's world. It emphasizes the analysis of historic booms and busts in various national economies as well as current global events and trends. Prerequisite: POL 115. Satisfies the Globalization overlay requirement and is a Latin American Studies course.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 353 Global Security (3 credits)

This course examines the weapons- and state-centric approach to security that was dominant during the Cold War and investigates how conceptions have changed since that era. While arms and militarization continue to be security concerns with the added threat of terrorism, economic strength and development, resource scarcity, environmental degradation, and human rights are all on the post-Cold War security agenda. The course contrasts a "national security" perspective with a "global" or "human security" one. Satisfies the Globalization overlay requirement and is a Faith-Justice course.

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 354 War and Peace (3 credits)

Why do wars occur and how does peace "break out" and become habituated in the relationships and politics among states and within nations? Traditionally, students of international relations have focused on wars and war prevention while assuming that peace was simply the absence of interstate violence. This course will investigate the major theories explaining the outbreak of conflict, and it will also explore definitions of peace and theories accounting for the building peace among states that were enemies and rivals, as well as the transformation of previously war-torn societies into places where normal political conflict is resolved through negotiation and institutional channels instead of with violence.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 356 American Foreign Policy (3 credits)

This course explores US foreign policy since the end of World War II. After a conceptual introduction (Part I) which explores the utility of interests, institutions, and ideas for accounting for American policy, the course examines the US-Soviet competition and the ways that that “cold” conflict affected U.S. behavior not only toward the USSR, but also toward other regions (Part II). Part III investigates the early post-Cold War period and the attempts and failures in constructing some kind of “New World Order,” and Part IV explores how the US has been responding to the twin challenges of terrorism and globalization.

Attributes: American Studies Course, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 357 America & the World Economy (3 credits)

POL 359 Contemporary Intil Migration (3 credits)

Migration has profound and transformative impacts on many aspects of politics, by its effects on labor markets, culture, gender, racial and ethnic relations, religion, and families and kinship ties. This course draws on social science literature to examine the causes and consequences of migration and the effects on both sending and destination countries in various regions of the world. It explores how various types of migrants - refugees, immigrants, guest workers, trafficked persons, and undocumented workers - have shaped and continue to reshape politics and society through their interactions and relationships with regimes of power and authority, established communities, and each other. This course also addresses the incorporation of migrants into political and economic life in their destination countries and how this reverberates in their home countries, the role of international organizations in global migration, and analysis of current migratory trends and polemics. Satisfies the Globalization overlay requirement.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

POL 361 Theories of Internat Relations (3 credits)

Central to the study of international relations is a solid understanding of the theoretical literature. While the introductory course gives students a taste of the field, serious students must spend more time exploring the arguments and implications of realism, liberalism, constructivism, Marxism,feminism and the various ontological and epistemological debates that underlie the intellectual competition and scholarly endeavors within and between the advocates of the various paradigms. This course provides that solid foundation, allows students to understand the state of the field today and gives them opportunity to evaluate these theoretical traditions and their ability to account for global politics. Any student considering graduate study in global affairs, regardless of major (e.g. Economics, English, History, International Relations, Political Science, Sociology, etc.) should take this class.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 364 Interntnl Relatns of East Asia (3 credits)

The course will examine and discuss the most intriguing dynamics of international relations in East Asia. Along with the historical analysis of international relation in the region since the mid-19th century, the course will engage in the discussion of pressing issues that characterize contemporary international politics in the region, including (1) regional economic development and interactions, (2) Sino-Taiwanese tension and the U.S. involvement, (3) North Korean nuclear crisis, (4) Japan and its post-Cold War security profile, and (5) regional tension over Japan’s militaristic past. Satisfies the Non-Western overlay requirement.

Attributes: Asian Studies Course, GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

POL 367 Ethics in Interntionl Affairs (3 credits)

What is morality in international politics? Is ethical reasoning and action possible in international affairs? If possible, when and how? Proponents of Realism often claim that there is virtually no room for morality in international affairs, and states and state actors are rational thinkers interacting in anarchy. For them, ethics are simply luxury and irrelevant. On the other hand, thinkers under the tradition of IR liberalism/idealism emphasize the ethical dimension of state decision making and state behaviors. On what moral ground or ethical reasoning, are the moral behaviors taking place and observed/unobserved? The primary objective of the course is to help students enhance their analytical ability for the study of international ethics. To this end, the course will explore the main traditions and theories of international ethics with a focus on such topical areas as just war and use of force, universal human rights and humanitarian intervention, and national collective memory and post-conflict reconciliation. Satisfies the Ethics Intensive overlay requirement.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 368 Women, Gender & World Politics (3 credits)

To some scholars and policy makers, the idea that conditions in which women and girls live is important to global politics is almost ridiculous, but others stress that until we understand how “gender makes the world go around” (Cynthia Enloe), we will fail to (1) see accurately the nature of power, (2) achieve just outcomes for all people, and (3) understand how masculinity and femininity affect the political and social world. This course exposes students to the development of feminism (a body of thought that advocates for female, and more recently, gender, equality) and examines the extent to which women have become empowered in politics in their own countries, as well as globally. Moreover, many feminist scholars and activists have become sensitive to the ways that elements of a person’s identity (race, class, gender, national origin, ethnicity, etc.) intersect in complex ways to provide her with elements of privilege and/or disadvantage. A central contention of this course is that empowerment is more than simply achieving the vote or becoming an elected official, and traditionally, some people (based on identity) have had an easier time achieving access and opportunities than have others. Empowerment means that all persons, regardless of gender, have influence over decisions that matter to them, security (both at home and in the global arena), economic opportunities, and are treated justly (are believed to possess inalienable human rights that are not somehow forfeited because of their gender). Satisfies the Globalization overlay requirement, and is also a Gender Studies course.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 370 Special Topics (3 credits)

Depending on the instructor, these courses will focus on a particular topic of interest in Political Science and Politics (e.g., The Presidential Election, The Arab Spring, Guns and the Supreme Court). Students may count only two POLs 270 and/or 370 courses for major or minor credit.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 401 Seminar on Freedom of Religion (3 credits)

POL 402 Contentious Politics in the US (3 credits)

Contentious politics consists of many “non-traditional” forms of political action, including social movements, protests, riots, and even political violence. This capstone political science seminar examines contentious politics in the U.S. through the lens of 1960/70s radical social movements, a key moment in U.S. politics in which the New Left imagined, theorized, negotiated, and contested the meaning of democracy and power. Students will examine and analyze the origins, ideologies, claims/grievances, goals, and strategies of radical political groups that roughly fall under the banner of the New Left: anti-war, feminism, black liberation, American Indian Movement, Chicano Movement, and Gay Liberation. We will study the politics of the struggle over rights, democracy, power, and the use/nonuse of violence within the New Left through a careful study of the primary texts (statements, agendas, etc.) produced by these groups. Students will investigate what the New Left helps us understand about power, politics, and violence in a modern democracy and evaluate the effectiveness of protest as a means to forward a political agenda, broadly defined. Prerequisite: POL 111 and POL 117 or permission of instructor. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement. This is an approved Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Prerequisites: POL 111 or POL 201 or POL 231 and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Political Science.

Attributes: GEP Social Science

POL 403 Nations and Nationalism (3 credits)

The primary objective of this seminar is to help students enhance their analytical abilities for the study of contemporary national problematique. In the rapidly changing contemporary global world, why are people still attracted, swayed, and annoyed by what is national? What is so important about being a part of nation? What drives people to develop specific allegiance toward a nation? And, how? More fundamentally, what is a nation? Prerequisite: POL 113 and POL 115 or permission of instructor. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement.

Prerequisites: POL 113 and (POL 115 or POL 105) and (POL 201 or POL 231 or IRT 250) and ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 404 Contemporary Peacebuilding (3 credits)

The end of the Cold War brought widespread hope for world peace. Long simmering civil strife and interstate confrontations abated in Latin America, the Korean peninsula, Southern Africa and the Middle East. War and destruction, however, were far from over, as places where conflict appeared mostly resolved in the 1990s—the Middle East and Chechnya—reignited at the turn of the century and new ones emerged. Then, after 9/11, state military campaigns inspired insurgencies in places like Afghanistan and Iraq that seemed to add a new dimension to the problem of restoring order and civility to war-torn societies. So, just what is peace and under what conditions is it made? How can a settlement be established and ultimately lead to peace in places devastated by internal conflict? This seminar investigates theoretical frameworks of peacemaking and peacebuilding and asks students to apply these perspectives to contemporary cases. Prerequisite: POL 113 and POL 115 or permission of instructor. Satisfies the Writing Intensive overlay requirement.

Prerequisites: POL 201 or POL 231 or IRT 250

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 407 Theories of Justice (3 credits)

What is political justice? We begin with an in-depth reading of the work that has defined justice in the 20th and 21st centuries: John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice. We will also read selections from Rawls’ Political Liberalism and his work on international justice, The Law of Peoples. In order to consider alternative theories of justice and criticisms of Rawls, we will read classic critical commentaries in the form of articles and book chapters from Michael Walzer, Michael Sandel, Alistair MacIntyre, Ronald Dworkin, Susan Okin, Robert Nozick, Brian Barry, Amartya Sen, and James Fishkin. Course requires in-depth reading of major political theorists of justice and encourages a sophisticated understanding of political justice through the weekly writing of critical, interpretive, and comparative essays. Students are encouraged to compare and contrast theories in order to develop a vocabulary of political ideology (liberalism, communitarianism, conservatism, feminism, legalism, utilitarianism, and post- modernism) as well as an understanding of different types of justice (e.g., distributive v. restorative). Prerequisite: POL 111 and POL 117 or permission of instructor. Satisfies the Writing Intensive and Ethics overlay requirements. This is an approved Justice and Ethics in the Law course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in International Relations or Political Science.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 409 Contemporary Internt Migration (3 credits)

Migration has become a topic of increasing focus and concern in the 21st century, with some arguing that it will be one of the defining issues of our time. This is certainly the case for those tens of millions of individuals who are currently on the move, for the sending communities and societies from which them emigrate and the destinations that receive them, and the nation-states that control their entrance and exit. In this seminar, we will cover the “big” issues of migration in a comparative format through engagement with some of the most important examples of the extensive body of literature in Migration Studies. Concretely, we will critically examine: the demographics of migration in key regions of the world; theories that explain mobility; host-immigrant relations and integration; the role of gender, race, and ethnicity in migration; the growth of transnational ties as an aspect of globalization; security; and the analysis of immigration policies and citizenship. Throughout the course of the semester, we will question continually challenge ourselves to question the approach to migration as a problem to be solves versus as a process to manage. As a capstone seminar, Global Migration as Problem and Process includes reading requirements that are extensive and challenging and approaches learning through a collective approach as we share our individual insights and understandings. We will learn from each other. Students must come to class having read the assignment materials critically so that we can grapple with ideas and engage in debate. Avid participation is required. There will be minimal formal lecturing and most seminar time will consist of open discussion. Furthermore, this capstone will draw upon the knowledge students have gained from many of their other Political Science classes. The course materials will draw heavily from empirical evidence (qualitative and quantitative) to explore the topics discussed above, while applying major theoretical concepts in Political Science. Students should come prepared to integrate the knowledge they have gained over the past four years. Prerequisite: POL 113 and POL 115 or permission of instructor. Satisfies the Writing-Intensive overlay requirement.

Prerequisites: POL 113 and POL 115

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

POL 411 Washington Internship I (3 credits)

At The Washington Center (see Special Academic Programs and Services for more information), students are placed in an internship where they work 30-35 hours in an office making substantive contributions to its work in politics, public policy, law, advocacy, or other related fields. For these activities, students earn two courses worth of upper division credit. Please note: the other courses at the Washington Center do not count for POL major or minor credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 412 Washington Internship II (3 credits)

At The Washington Center (see Special Academic Programs and Services for more information), students are placed in an internship where they work 30-35 hours in an office making substantive contributions to its work in politics, public policy, law, advocacy, or other related fields. For these activities, students earn two courses worth of upper division credit. Please note: the other courses at the Washington Center do not count for POL major or minor credit.

Attributes: Undergraduate

POL 413 International Internship I (3 credits)

Some study abroad programs offer internship credit for one or two classes. Please note: subject to administrative approval, students may earn two courses of UD POL credit if their internship is in the 32- hour/week range.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 414 International Internship II (3 credits)

Some study abroad programs offer internship credit for one or two classes. Please note: subject to administrative approval, students may earn two courses of UD POL credit if their internship is in the 32- hour/week range.

Attributes: International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 417 Urban Politics (3 credits)

POL 470 Independent Study (3 credits)

POL 491 Philadelphia-Area Internship (3 credits)

Supervised internships in the Philadelphia area provide students an opportunity to intern with elected officials, public interest organizations, party organizations, and many other groups involved with politics and policy including the Philadelphia DA’s office, CBS, or Senator Casey’s office. The course helps student: (1) develop tools for a job search; (2) professional writing skills (e.g. resume and cover letter); and (3) integrate academic skills into professional life. In fall, the course allows students to choose any organization related to politics, policy, or law. In spring, most students serve as Global Smarts mentors for the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia. Course credit available for International Relations and/or Justice and Ethics in the Law – with permission of the internship coordinator and the program director. Course counts for POL or IR credit once. With permission of the internship coordinator and POL department chair, course can be taken by POL and IR majors a second time as an elective. Course is open to ALL majors.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: GEP Social Science, International Relations Course, Undergraduate

POL 493 Honors Research in Pol Sci I (3 credits)

Majors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in Political Science courses may apply to the Honors Program to earn College Honors. Applications are due in Spring of the junior year for the right to perform a year-long research project under the supervision of a Political Science Department member. To succeed in the application, the student should be in conversation with that faculty member early on in the junior year. Then, the student works closely with her/his mentor over the course of the senior year to prepare and present a thesis that passes the scrutiny of the mentor, an outside faculty reader with complementary expertise, and a member of the Honors Committee. Specific requirements for the College Honors thesis may be found under “Honors Program”. Prior approval from the Honors Program and Department is necessary. Students who complete Departmental Honors are not required to take a POL Capstone Course. One semester of HON research counts for the Capstone Course and the other for an upper division POL course.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate

POL 494 Honors Research in Pol Sci II (3 credits)

Majors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in Political Science courses may apply to the Honors Program to earn College Honors. Applications are due in Spring of the junior year for the right to perform a year-long research project under the supervision of a Political Science Department member. To succeed in the application, the student should be in conversation with that faculty member early on in the junior year. Then, the student works closely with her/his mentor over the course of the senior year to prepare and present a thesis that passes the scrutiny of the mentor, an outside faculty reader with complementary expertise, and a member of the Honors Committee. Specific requirements for the College Honors thesis may be found under “Honors Program”. Prior approval from the Honors Program and Department is necessary. Students who complete Departmental Honors are not required to take a POL Capstone Course. One semester of HON research counts for the Capstone Course and the other for an upper division POL course.

Attributes: GEP Social Science, Undergraduate