Health Services

Department Overview

Health care is one of the most rapidly growing career fields in the United States. Aging baby boomers, new medical technology and interest in maintaining healthy lifestyles created demand for committed and compassionate professionals with a strong understanding of the bio psychosocial aspects of health and wellness. The B.S. in Interdisciplinary Health Services (IHS) prepares students for health care positions in hospitals, public health departments, human service agencies, clinical research and the healthcare industry. The majority of IHS graduates proceed to clinical or graduate school to study allied health fields, such as nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, physician assistants, pharmacy, or public health. Of the graduates who seek employment immediately after graduation, 61% work in health/medicine/biotechnology, 17% in human and community service, 11% in insurance and 11% in education or government. Careers include health administrators, managed care analysts, health educators, program coordinators, patient representatives, and patient care technicians.

The IHS program offers comprehensive education in the natural sciences, public health, health care systems, and social sciences. Students are introduced to a broad array of medical issues such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, addictions, injuries, violence, autism, and adverse childhood experiences. Courses address the socio-cultural influences of health, health behaviors, health care systems, legal and ethical concerns, nutrition, mental health, integrative medicine, epidemiology and health promotion. The IHS major provides flexibility so that students may tailor coursework based upon interests and career goals. The health services faculty represent many years of experience in health care and are able to guide students in developing their own unique career paths. Students are encouraged to complete prerequisites needed for graduate programs, study abroad or minor in biology, chemistry, psychology, sociology or business. Consistent with our Jesuit mission of cura personalis and social justice, the department encourages majors to learn inside and outside of the classroom. Volunteering with local service agencies interning in a local hospital, or participating in summer scholars, allows students to experience different healthcare careers and to build professional portfolios. The Department models interdisciplinary, collaborative approaches, encouraging students learn to partner with patients, family members, community organizations and colleagues in other disciplines to face the challenges of emerging and re-emerging diseases.

Mission Statement

Consistent with our Jesuit roots and Ignatian goals of education, the graduate programs in Health Services  are built on a liberal arts foundation with an emphasis on ethics,  social justice, and professional competency. By enhancing skills in verbal communication, writing, critical thinking, quantitative analysis, globalization, and diversity, health services graduate programs prepare graduates to confront current and emerging issues in healthcare.

Professor: Ajoa A. Abrokwa; Frank Bernt, Ph.D.; Lucia Paccione, M.B.A.; M. Michelle Rowe, Ph.D.; Sally Kuykendall, PhD
Assistant: Anne Fetherston, Ph.D., BCBA-D; Eileen L. Sullivan, Pharm.D.; Nene Okunna, Ph.D.; Thomas Robert Martin, PhD
Visiting: Elizabeth B. Fong; Thomas L. Heron, MBA, FHFMA
Louis D. Horvath, M.A., FACHE; Sheila Mitchell-Green MHA, LSSGB

Chair:  Frank Bernt, Ph.D.

HAD 101 Intro to Health Administration (3 credits)

An introduction to health care services focusing on current components, practices, issues, and trends in the health delivery system. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, economic, legal, and technological forces that affect health care.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 110 Prin Publ Hlth & Epiderm (3 credits)

A survey of environmental, communicable, chronic, and genetic health problems and the public health and epidemiological responses to them. Basic epidemiological concepts, strategies, research, methodologies, and statistical tools will be introduced.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 115 Research Methods in HAD (3 credits)

Health Services Research explores the history of health research, basic principles and types of research in order that health administrators will be able to critically evaluate research in healthcare. This course is a combination of lecture, discussion and experiential learning designed to instill a critical understanding of the research process for application to professional practice.

HAD 120 Fin Mgt Hlth Care Organization (3 credits)

An advanced application of the current issues and techniques affecting financial management in the health care system. Topics include cost accounting, cost benefit analysis, accountability in not-for-profit/non-profit institutions, prospective and third party payments, management information systems for operational and fiscal control, and cost containment. Prerequisite: HAD 101.

Prerequisites: HAD 2605 or HAD 100 or HAD 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 200 Health Care Law & Ethics (3 credits)

An overview of the legal and ethical issues central to the health care delivery system and their impact on individual institutions and professionals. The relationships among biomedical and research technology, societal changes, court rulings, and governmental legislation within the context of the health care system will be examined. Prerequisite: HAD 101.

Prerequisites: HAD 2605 or HAD 100 or HAD 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 210 Plan & Mktg Health Care Org (3 credits)

An introduction to general strategic planning and marketing for health care systems with particular emphasis on the evolution from a provider-controlled environment to a consumer market. Review of key factors such as rising costs, increasing competition, legislation/regulation, technological advancements, and increased consumer sophistication.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 220 Health Policy (3 credits)

An overview of how health care policy is enacted in the U.S. Analysis of how the expansion of government programs and regulations since 1965 have influenced health care delivery. Emphasis will be placed on current policy questions and important health care policy debates.

Prerequisites: HAD 2605 or (HAD 100 or HAD 101)

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 301 Health Info Mgmt Systems (3 credits)

A critical skill for health administrators is to be able to gather, organize, analyze and safely store important health information. This course provides an overview of healthcare information management and applications within healthcare organizations. Pre-requisite: HAD 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

HAD 310 Seminar in Hlth Administration (3 credits)

Taken with the Practicum, this course is the capstone for integration between theory and practice of health administration. Each student will be responsible for the preparation of a research paper on a topic in health administration. Topics of emphasis will include health services research, administration in health settings, organizational development, human resource development, and current issues relevant to student field practicums. Students must have permission before enrolling. Prerequisite: HAD 101, 110, 120, 200, 210, and 220..

Prerequisites: (HAD 101 and (HAD 110 and (HAD 200 and (HAD 120 or HAD 210 or HAD 220

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 346 Admin Health Care Organization (3 credits)

HAD 551 Managed Health Care (3 credits)

HAD 552 Health Administration (3 credits)

An introduction to the principles of administration within health and human services organizations and the basic concepts of leadership and organizational theories relevant to effective administration of healthcare institutions. Organizations are viewed as open systems requiring constant interactions with the environment. Considerable emphasis is placed on quality improvement and organizational change.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 553 Health Care Organization (3 credits)

An overview of the organization, structure, and financing of the healthcare delivery system in the United States. The various elements comprising the system will be presented, along with an exploration of the basic concepts and measures of health, disease, needs, quality, and utilization. Issues in healthcare resourcing, institutions, and system organization will be examined.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 554 Health Care Law (3 credits)

An examination of the major legal issues encountered in the health care field by administrators and practitioners. Among the topics to be included are principles of liability, legal aspects of medical ethics, and legislative and regulatory factors in health care delivery.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 555 Acc for Health Care Organiztns (3 credits)

An introduction to basic accounting techniques used in the healthcare industry. Prerequisites: three core courses – HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, or HSV 551.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 556 Fin Manag of Health Care Org. (3 credits)

An introduction to the basic theories and practices of financial management as they relate to healthcare organizations. Course includes budgeting principles. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, and HSV 551.

Prerequisites: HAD 555

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 557 Health Care Strat Plan & Mktg (3 credits)

An introductory course that examines the foundations, principles, and basic applications of this field. Internal and external forces that shape marketing policies and planning are explored. Topics include the development of marketing strategies and programs, as well as marketing mix variables and general healthcare planning. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, and HSV 551.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 558 Hospital Administration (3 credits)

In depth study of hospital operations with emphasis on not-for profit/nonprofit settings; focus on departmental operations, role of administration, the board, and medical staff. Includes legal and reform trends affecting hospitals, financial mechanisms, budgeting, labor relations and corporate restructuring. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, and HSV 551.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 559 Health Policy (3 credits)

The formulation and analysis of health policy at federal, state, local, and corporate levels. This course presents an overview of the legislative, regulatory, and political processes and their effect on the health care system. This course will provide a conceptual and analytic framework for bioethical policy analysis regarding policy formulation, adoption, implementation, operation, evaluation, and termination. Pragmatic application of policy analysis tools is included.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 560 Health Care Informatics (3 credits)

A survey of the current use of information technology in the clinical and management practice for the healthcare delivery enterprise. Students will become familiar with the basic terminology, strategies, and utilization of IT as a key component in the delivery of patient care. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, and HSV 551.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 561 Health Care and the Internet (3 credits)

Examination of the specific roles that internet technology plays in healthcare. Observations and trends that play a significant role in improving the quality of healthcare delivery will be discussed. Various components such as intranets, extranets, knowledge management and web design concepts will be explored.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 562 Hlth Info Mgt Sys Data & Infra (3 credits)

Analysis and case study of IT networks, internets, data interchange, data access, and data management. Prerequisite: for Healthcare Informatics students only and HAD 560 is preferred.

HAD 563 Hlth Info Mgt Syst Appl (3 credits)

Case study of the foundation and incorporation of the critical IT applications in the modern healthcare delivery enterprise. Specific applications will be explored with an emphasis placed on the practice of Managed Care. Note: This course is available for Healthcare Infomatics students only. It is preferred that students have taken both HAD 560 and HAD 562 before taking this course.

HAD 564 Computer-Based Patient Record (3 credits)

An in-depth analysis of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) standards, requirements, attributes, and benefits of the CPR and its use in the healthcare delivery enterprise. The use of data warehouses, data repositories, and integration technology will be explored relevant to CPR development along with the various issues and strategies for implementation.

HAD 565 Decision Support & Data Analy (3 credits)

HAD 566 Hlth Info Syst Res Mngt (3 credits)

HAD 567 Leadership, Strat & Plan HIMS (3 credits)

HAD 570 Psyc Aspects Chrnc Ill & Disb (3 credits)

A survey of psychological, social, and behavioral theories and principles as they relate to the experiences of chronic illness and disability. The course will emphasize the impact of these experiences on the patient in terms of motivation and life satisfaction, restructuring social support systems, and changes in psychosocial/developmental needs. Attention will be given to the changing role of the health professional as direct care provider, manager, consultant, and advocate. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, and HSV 551.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 600 Ethics of Health Care (3 credits)

A critical examination of the central ethical issues in the healthcare field. Issues to be treated include euthanasia, life-prolonging medical technologies, abortion, screening for genetic defects, experimentation and informed consent, distribution of scarce medical resources, the right to healthcare, and its implications for the healthcare delivery system. Necessary background in moral philosophy will be provided.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 601 Fieldwork in Health Admin (3 credits)

Students who have a GPA of 3.5 or higher may pursue experiential learning through fieldwork or internship in an approved healthcare facility or nonprofit organization. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, HSV 551 plus one administrative course (either HSV 554, HAD 555, HAD 556 or HAD 560).

Prerequisites: HAD 552 and HAD 553 and HAD 554 and HAD 555 and HAD 556 and HAD 560 and HAD 600 and HSV 550 and HSV 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 602 Directed Resrch in Health Serv (3 credits)

The Health Services Department provides opportunities for selected students to conduct independent research under the supervision of department faculty. Students desiring to participate in Directed Research must identify and meet with a faculty mentor, submit a formal research proposal with proposed timeline for completion, and obtain approval for the project from the faculty mentor, program director, department chair and associate dean. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 600, HSV 550, HSV 551 plus one administrative course (either HSV 554, HAD 555, HAD 556 or HAD 560.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HSV 550 Health Services Research (3 credits)

Explores the history of health research, basic principles and types of research in order that health professionals will be able to critically evaluate research in their respective fields. This course is a combination of lecture, discussion and experiential learning designed to instill a critical understanding of the research process for application to clinical practice.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HSV 551 Managed Health Care (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to managed care including current and evolving models, terminology, and differences among insurers and payer types. The course will focus on the use of financial incentives to restrain healthcare costs and the role of utilization review, peer review, provider.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HSV 700 Integ Capstne Crs in Hlth Serv (3 credits)

An integrative capstone course in which the student is expected to integrate and synthesize prior course work and to demonstrate competence in health services through the analysis of complex cases in health services delivery and management and the development of a case of his/her own based on experience and observation. Integrative Capstone should be the final course in the curriculum. Prerequisites: HAD 552, HAD 553, HAD 555, HAD 556, HAD 560, HAD 600, HSV 550, HSV 551, and HSV 554

Prerequisites: HAD 552 and HAD 553 and HAD 555 and HAD 556 and HAD 560 and HAD 600 and HSV 550 and HSV 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

IHS 100 Intro:Autism Spectrum Disorder (3 credits)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD’s), including Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Asperger’s Syndrome, are common, occurring in 1 in 166 individuals. The result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, ASD’s impact social interactions and communication skills. The types of ASD’s range in severity from very low functioning associated with significant cognitive deficits and highly disruptive behaviors, to very high functioning, associated with highly gifted intelligence and "quirky" behaviors. This course introduces students to the neurology, symptoms, diagnostic criteria, causes, biomedical treatments, and behavioral interventions, as well as to the impact on individuals with ASD’s, families, friends, school districts, the economy, and society with regard to functioning, coping, prognosis, and outcomes.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 101 Intro to App Behavior Analysis (3 credits)

This is the first course within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification. This course is designed to introduce the current research-based interventions in the field of applied behavior analysis and autism. Students will gain a general understanding of the philosophical underpinnings, the concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis and how they can be used across multiple environments (home, school, early intervention, clinics) to address the various social, behavioral and communication deficits of individuals with autism. Topics addressed include respondent and operating conditioning, reinforcement, punishment, extinction, generalization, discrimination, matching law, and various contingencies.

IHS 102 Ethics& Professionalism in ABA (3 credits)

This is the second course within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification. This course will explore professional and ethical issues in the field of applied behavior analysis. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  Professional and Ethical Compliance Code will be examined and its relation to the provision of services. Students will explore ethical problem solving and practices, , and societal issues of importance related to culture, human rights, punishment, parenting, education, behavior management, and workplace behavior. Students learn to demonstrate professionalism in the field and practice resolving ethical dilemmas from case studies and their work settings.

Prerequisites: IHS 101

IHS 110 Psyc Aspcts Illness & Disab (3 credits)

A survey of the psychological, social, and behavioral theories as they relate to the experiences of chronic illness and disability with particular emphasis on how bio-psychosocial factors impact motivation, social support, and life satisfaction. Current theories, as they apply to the epidemiology of public health behaviors throughout the life cycle are evaluated. An inquiry into the health needs of women, children, and ethnic minorities is explored, as well as how society perceives and responds to people with illnesses and disabilities.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

This is a first year seminar course designed to introduce non-major students to several major themes of American health care and to a comparison of this country’s health care system in relation to the health care systems of other countries. These macro health care issues include the social, political, and cultural foundations for health care, the economics of health care delivery, the ethical frameworks countries use to establish their interpretation of acceptable performance and behavior, the process by which the United States and other countries develop and implement their health policies, and what are now global trends for health care regardless of historical past, political system, or social cultures. The course requires significant analysis and critical review, application of data mining and literature reviews to study the unique aspects of the American health care system and how this system compares to those of other countries.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 151 Global Health Care (3 credits)

IHS 200 Applied Behav Anlysis & Autism (3 credits)

This is the first course within the Onground 5th Edition Verified Course Sequence toward BCaBA Certification. This course is designed to introduce the gold standard of research-based interventions in the field of autism: applied behavior analysis, a natural science approach to studying behavior. It covers principles of learning and behavior in relation to autism spectrum disorders, from relatively simple concepts such as reinforcement to more complex issues such as the acquisition of human language. Students will gain a general understanding of applied behavior analysis principles and how these principles guide the foundation toward a behavioral treatment approach for individuals with autism.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 201 Skill Assess&Instruc: ABA&Aut (3 credits)

This is the second course within the Onground 5th Edition Verified Course Sequence toward BCaBA Certification. This course is designed to provide research-based interventions in the field of autism for skill assessment and instruction, utilizing applied behavior analysis, a natural science approach to studying behavior. It covers principles of learning and behavior in relation to skill deficits in autism spectrum disorders, from relatively simple concepts such as prompting procedures to more complex treatment such as Discrete Trail Training (DTT). Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the steps necessary to utilize applied behavior analysis principles in skill assessment and intervention, and how these principles guide building an individualized social skills curriculum for children and adolescents with autism (ages 2 – 21 years old).

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 202 Single Single Research in ABA (3 credits)

This is the third course within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification. This course covers assessment of behavior, including all dimensions of behavior and structured observation. Single-case research methods, including reversal, multiple baseline, changing criterion, alternating treatment, and multi-element designs are covered. Students will be expected to understand, interpret, and apply single-subject research methodology through the experience of defining behavior, collecting data, calculating inter-observer agreement, and creating graphical displays of data. Students will have the opportunity to implement basic experiments for evaluating the effectiveness of behavioral interventions.

Prerequisites: IHS 102

IHS 211 HlthCareSystem/ Responsibility (3 credits)

An introduction to public health and the organization and structure of the health care delivery system in the United States. This course will focus upon the various types of health care services, where these services are provided, ways to assess and keep track of diseases and public health care needs, health policies, and administration of these services. Also included will be a discussion of how legal, economic, psychological, cultural, political, ethical, and technological forces affect health care and the people who provide it. An introduction to managed care including current and evolving models, terminology, and differences among insurers and payer types will be included.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 216 Alcohol, Drugs & Society (3 credits)

IHS 217 Mental Health & Society (3 credits)

This course examines the connections between mental health and society. What are the major forms of mental and behavioral health and illness? How widespread are mental disorders and what predicts their occurrence? What impact do they have on society and institutions such as health care and criminal justice? How does mental illness relate to social norms? What roles do psychiatric diagnoses play in society and how do diagnoses affect individuals relative to society?

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 243 HelpHealing:EthicsCommPersonal (3 credits)

IHS 244 Health Care Administration (3 credits)

This course focuses on the fundamental principles and theories of administration in a number of different types of health care and public health organizations. It covers areas of management, supervision, and leadership required in today’s complex health care settings such as hospitals, public health agencies, physician practices, clinical departments, ambulatory and long-term care settings, and health education programs with an emphasis on human resources, finance, budgeting, planning, customer relations, systems design, outcome measures, and program evaluation. It recognizes the unique characteristics of health care organizations and what is needed to operate clinical, educational, and public health programs in this environment. Critical administrative strategies will be presented giving students opportunities to understand their importance and how they may be applied. Through various instructional methodologies such as case studies, team assignments, guest presentations, and role-plays, students will experience the rich, exciting environment of health care administration.

IHS 248 Hlth and the School aged Child (3 credits)

This course introduces students to some of the unique health issues faced by the school-aged child. In contemporary society, schools have become one of the primary avenues of health care; the school is responsible for assuring that a child has received all of his/her required vaccinations and regular health examinations. Schools provide routine health screenings for diseases such as high blood pressure, and often are the first to notice mental health problems such as Depression, ADHD, eating disorders, and addictions. In addition, schools are required to provide regular health education programs relative to prevention of illness, physical fitness, and sex education. Issues such as coping with childhood chronic illnesses including Type I Diabetes and Asthma, what happens when a child is diagnosed with cancer, AIDS, a learning or physical disability, or Depression, as well as the importance of proper nutrition, physical fitness, mental health, and the reduction of risky health behavior will be addressed.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 251 Healthcare Law and Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of legal and ethical issues central to the health care delivery system and their impact on individual institutions and professionals. The relationships among biomedical and technology, societal changes, court rulings, and governmental legislation within the context of the healthcare system will be examined. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP)

IHS 252 Health Care Policy (3 credits)

This course will explore health care policy issues (such as Medicare, Social Security, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, AIDS/HIV programs) and lead to a general understanding of the health care policy process. Focus will be placed on examining the various factors that lead to health care policy at the state and national level, and how health care policy impacts health care professionals’ ability to deliver care and consumers’ ability to utilize care in an ever-changing environment. The role of the political process to address issues revolving around cost of health care, access to and quality of that care will be addressed. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 253 Nutrition:Health & Disease (3 credits)

The number of children who are obese or overweight in the United States has tripled in the past twenty years. Being overweight puts people at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other health related problems. A basic knowledge in the science of food helps people make wise food choices, avoid disease, and to live longer, more productive lives. This course explores fundamentals of nutrition, diet-related diseases and current issues. The content material of IHS 253 Nutrition: Health and Disease overlaps with the content of CHM 110 Food Chemistry I and CHM 111 Food Chemistry II. Students may take either Nutrition or the Food Chemistry courses, not both.

Restrictions: Students cannot enroll who have a major in Food Marketing.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 255 Human Sexuality and Disease (3 credits)

Human Sexuality and Disease explores the biological, psychosocial, behavioral and cultural perspectives of human sexuality. The course has a strong emphasis on sexual anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, and health behaviors.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

IHS 256 HIV/AIDS (3 credits)

This course offers the student the opportunity for an in-depth assessment of one of the most critical public health issues facing the world today. Topics include current HIV/AIDS information as well as exploration of related issues including politics, sexuality, homophobia, ethical Issues, discrimination, international implications, and worldwide economic effects. This class will include site visits to local agencies in the Philadelphia area as well. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 263 Theory:AddictionAddictiveBehav (3 credits)

This course involves the study of the nature and causes of substance abuse and other compulsive behaviors. The historical and socio/cultural/economic trends are evaluated in view of current and new addiction theories and treatment interventions. Emphasis is placed upon the relation of addiction to family and work environments.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 270 ViolenceAggression:Deconstruct (3 credits)

IHS 276 The Continuum of Adult Health (3 credits)

This course will focus on the demographic, political, economic and psychosocial issues of adults along the continuum of health from community-based services to home care, hospice, hospital and nursing home settings. The course will focus on the interventions that health providers can use to maximize safety, function and social stability in the community, deferring or delaying institutionalization. Specific topics will include fall prevention, medication safety, telemedicine applications, HIV transmission prevention, improving cognitive function, improving nutrition the effects of widowhood, increasing longevity, improving the quality of life and the quality of care of adults and the avoidance of hospitalization and nursing home placement.

IHS 280 Global Health Disparities (3 credits)

IHS 285 Med Terminology & Health Comm (3 credits)

Students, within the Interdisciplinary Health Services Major/Minor, are exposed to many courses related to acute illness, disease and prevention. Ongoing advancement in the allied health professions dictates the need for students to understand proper medical and anatomical terminology to include its source language, evolution and application in the field of medicine and allied health. The need to understand proper medical and anatomical terminology is imperative as this language provides proficient communication between members of the same profession, minimizing the potential for misinterpretation in such a highly critical field. This course will introduce and educate students to a substantial medical vocabulary comprised of prefixes (location of an organ, the number of parts, or time involved), word roots (body part) and suffixes (condition,disease process, or procedure) which are utilized by health care practitioners as a devoted language. This course will describe the human body, coupled components, conditions, processes and medical treatments; providing the proper medical vocabulary for each.

IHS 300 Behav Assess&Interv ABA&Aut (4 credits)

This is the third course within the Onground 5th Edition Verified Course Sequence toward BCaBA Certification and connects to the first concentrated supervised experience at the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support. The course content covers the research-based and comprehensive interventions to address behavioral needs in the field of autism through functional behavior assessment and functional analysis within applied behavior analysis, through completing a total of 250 hours of supervised experience. Students will gain a thorough understanding of applied behavior analysis principles related to behavioral assessment and how these principles guide a formal behavior intervention plan process for children, adolescents, and adults with autism. Through this experience, students will apply concepts learned in Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism through a primary assignment of providing direct implementation with individuals with autism. Students will also apply concepts learned in Skill Assessment and Instruction in ABA and Autism through a progress monitoring assignment within a Social Skills program, where the student will select goals based on assessment, determine appropriate data collection materials, complete objective observations, and analyze progress for a group of individuals with autism. To apply concepts learned in Behavioral Assessment, students will complete their first functional behavioral assessment for an individual with autism.

Prerequisites: (IHS 100 or IHS 465) and IHS 200 and IHS 201

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 301 Ethics&Profess: ABA&Aut (4 credits)

This is the fourth course within the Onground 5th Edition Verified Course Sequence toward BCaBA Certification and connects to the second concentrated supervised experience at the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support. This course covers ethical concepts and decision making for behavior analysis professionals through the Behavior Analyst Certification Board Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. Students will learn the depth of the compliance code as well as the ability to analyze and apply the code through real life settings, completing a total of 250 hours of supervised experience. Students will continue to enhance skills gained in Concentrated Field Experience 1, by continuing direct implementation with individuals with autism. Students will expand the progress monitoring assignment to a new age group of individuals with autism within a Social Skills program, where the student will select goals based on assessment, determine appropriate data collection materials, complete objective observations, and analyze progress for a group of individuals with autism. To apply concepts learned in Ethics and Professionalism in Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Treatment, students will complete a second functional behavioral assessment for an individual with autism, as well as following their first functional behavioral assessment utilizing procedural integrity methods.

Prerequisites: (IHS 100 or IHS 465) and IHS 200 and IHS 201 and IHS 300

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 302 Advan.App. Behavior Analysis (3 credits)

This is the fifth course within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification. This course is designed to expand upon the previously learned concepts of behavior analysis and connect it to the practical world. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how to use the principles and practices of applied behavioral. This course behavior change procedures from covers principles of learning and behavior from relatively simple animal studies to more complex issues such as the acquisition of human language. Examples of topics reviewed in depth include operant and respondent conditioning, reinforcement, punishment, extinction, shaping, chaining, stimulus control, and verbal behavior. Multi-disciplinary, real world examples and applications will be introduced.

Prerequisites: IHS 202

IHS 315 The Culture of Addiction (3 credits)

IHS 323 Health and Society (3 credits)

Health and health care are of central concern in a post-industrial society. This course examines sociological issues in health and health care, with special focus on the contemporary United States. How do such factors as race, gender, and social class shape physical and mental illness? How is health care organized, and what professions and organizations make up the health care sector? How have health and health care become major social problems, and what are the prospects for major social change in society’s response to health issues? During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of a diversity, non- western or globalization course.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 325 Theories:Disease Prevent Mgmt (3 credits)

Health theories provide practitioners with tools to understand health-related behaviors and develop effective interventions against disease. This course introduces students to commonly used models and theories, such as the Health Belief Model, Stages of Change, Diffusion of Innovations, Social Cognitive Theory, Health Communications, and Social Marketing. The theoretical foundations apply to the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, heart disease, cancer, and injuries

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 331 Statistics & Research Methods (3 credits)

Statistics and Research Methods introduces students to research methods and data analyses as they apply to research in the health services field. Topics are human participant protections, research designs, instrumentation, validity, reliability, quantitative and qualitative data analyses, and drawing conclusions. Students are responsible for developing a research idea, writing an extensive review of the literature, analyzing data, and discussing the results. This course is approved as a faith justice studies course. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 343 HelpHealing:EthicsCommPersonal (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a hands-on practicum-style learning environment and explores health- related counseling theories and techniques to build the skills necessary for engaging with patients and clients as future health professionals. Using a three-phase approach which merges contemporary health issues (e.g. violence, addiction, overweight/obesity) with skill-building activities, students develop the basic skills needed for effective one-on-one, group, and crisis counseling to support prevention and treatment of disease. Students will gain competencies including but not limited to: interviewing techniques; active listening; decision making; problem-solving; and factors affecting energy, control, and symptoms of patients and clients. The course will also emphasize basic models in counseling (e.g. behavioral counseling; Gestalt, Rational-Emotive and Rogerian therapies; crisis counseling) and proven helping techniques. Upon completion, students will be able to critically assess, discuss, and demonstrate effective counseling and assessment with individuals and groups.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 345 DyingWell:The Hospice Movement (3 credits)

This course examines how people across cultures and throughout history have responded to the challenge of dying. It will examine cultural practices relating to treatment of the death and to care of the dying, as well as the process of confronting one’s own death from a psychological perspective. After describing the limitations of the traditional medical (curative) model’s approach to death, the course will study the hospice movement: its history, philosophy, and practices of caring. In addition to specific models and essential components of hospice care, administrative issues (legal, reimbursement, human resources) will be addressed. This course will include presentations by and interviews with hospice workers, as well as a survey of hospices in the metropolitan area. This course includes a weekly service-learning requirement.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 349 Managed Health Care (3 credits)

IHS 354 Diversity Ldrship in Hlth Care (3 credits)

The impact of valuing diversity and multiculturalism is profound in the healthcare field. Research has long suggested that health outcomes and health services delivery are improved when caregivers and managers integrate genuine valuing of diversity in their operations. This course offers students the means to develop effective awareness, knowledge and sensitivity concerning diversity and multiculturalism. It provides strategies and insights allowing students to build their leadership skills in this critical area and then apply such knowledge and competencies in the field itself.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 357 Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 credits)

IHS 359 PlanningEvaluatingHealthPromo (3 credits)

Community health education programs are a cost effective way to prevent injuries and diseases. The most effective programs are theory based, include an evaluation component, and are tailored to the audience. This course takes students through the process of health promotion planning including theoretical foundations, needs assessment, program development, and evaluation. Development and implementation of a health promotion project is a core component of the course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 360 TherapRolesAnimals in Hlthcare (3 credits)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of animals in formal roles of support within society. Various levels of animal-assisted interventions and their legal implications, including Emotional Support Animals, Animal-Assisted Activities, Animal-Assisted Therapy, and Service Animals will be reviewed. The role of animals providing services to people with autism spectrum disorders, children with cancer, individuals with psychiatric disorders, the elderly, and individuals with physical disabilities will be discussed. The history of Animal-Assisted interventions leading up to their current status will be addressed. Prerequisites: IHS 110, IHS 465, PSY 208, or SOC 217.

Prerequisites: IHS 110 or IHS 465 or PSY 208 or SOC 217

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 368 Just Hlth Care Dev Nations (3 credits)

An investigation of adequate health care as a fundamental human right. The course will proceed from the premise that socially induced needs are a result of historical development of material and social conditions, coupled with a social consensus that some things are necessary for happiness, social life, or some other goal. It will consider the inability of many societies to supply adequate health care as an issue of basic personal dignity, a claim against society, and as a matter of justice. The course will examine the issue of just health care for all peoples from both public health and ethical perspectives. Latin American Studies.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

IHS 370 Special Topics in Health Servi (3 credits)

IHS 400 Appld Resrch Dsgn: ABA&Aut (4 credits)

This is the fifth course within the Onground 5th Edition Verified Course Sequence toward BCaBA Certification and connects to the third concentrated supervised experience at the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support. This course covers research design and how to systematically analyze all dimensions of behavior and structured observation through applied intervention. Single-case research methods, including reversal, multiple baseline, changing criterion, alternating treatment, and multielement designs are covered. Students will be expected to understand, interpret, and apply single-subject research methodology, completing a total of 250 hours of supervised experience. Through this experience, students will apply all prior concepts learned within the first four content classes, through a case management assignment. The case management assignment will include both skill and behavioral assessment, selecting and prioritizing goals and target behaviors based on record review, objective observation, indirect and direct measures. In addition, the case management assignment will include selecting intervention and teaching procedures, in building skill instruction plans and analyzing data through progress reports. To apply concepts learned in Applied Research Design, students will complete a case study within their case management assignment, whether through skill instruction or behavioral intervention.

Prerequisites: (IHS 100 or IHS 465) and IHS 200 and IHS 201 and IHS 300 and IHS 301

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 401 Behav Consult: ABA&Aut (4 credits)

This is the sixth and final course within the Onground 5th Edition Verified Course Sequence toward BCaBA Certification and connects to the fourth and final concentrated supervised experience at the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support. Students will build upon previous knowledge around behavior analytic principles, measurement, data, experimental design, ethics, assessment, selecting and implementing interventions, completing a total of 250 hours of supervised experience. This course takes that foundation and applies it to of data-based decision making to evaluate the effects of interventions for clients and staff, continuing with their case management assignment from Concentrated Field Experience 3, as well as their case study. Students also learn to collaborate while selecting and implementing interventions that integrate behavior analytic concepts and principles into plans and to rely on the best available scientific evidence and to incorporate information about preferences, risks, the environment, and social validity for program planning, via their third and final functional behavioral assessment. This consultation task will require utilizing the conjoint behavior consultation method across all steps of the process with the parents, additional professionals and direct care staff on the case.

Prerequisites: (IHS 100 or IHS 465) and IHS 200 and IHS 201 and IHS 300 and IHS 301 and IHS 400

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 402 Assessment in ABA (3 credits)

This is the sixth course within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification. Assessment is an important part of any behavior analytic intervention. This course is designed to expand upon the previously learned concepts of behavior analysis and will present the student with information on observation, data collection, and data interpretation. Students will learn the methods for obtaining descriptive data and the procedures for conducting systematic manipulations. Functional assessments and analysis of individual behaviors will be a primary focus. Students will review completing record review, determining the need for services, identifying socially significant behavior, identifying client strengths and weaknesses, conducting preference assessments, graphing functions of behaviors, various application of assessment within behavior analysis, and the important of interdisciplinary collaboration, and incorporating client quality of life and happiness. Students will also have the opportunity to complete a functional behavior assessment, and review mock client data.

Prerequisites: IHS 302

IHS 403 Consultation & Supervis in ABA (3 credits)

This is the seventh and final course within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s  (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification. This is the final course in the sequence, where students will build upon previous knowledge around behavior analytic principles, measurement, data, experimental design, ethics, assessment, selecting and implanting interventions. This course takes that foundation and applies it to data-based decision making to evaluate the effects of interventions for clients and staff of organizations. Students also learn to collaborate while selecting and implementing interventions that integrate behavior analytic concepts and principles into plans and to rely on the best available scientific evidence and to incorporate information about preferences, risks, the environment, and social validity for program planning. The course includes team activities and case studies to assess and intervene in collaborative, positive ways that maximize outcomes.

Prerequisites: IHS 302

IHS 404 Concentrated Field Experience1 (3 credits)

This is the first concentrated field experience, within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification.

Prerequisites: IHS 101

IHS 405 Concentrated Field Experience2 (3 credits)

This is the second concentrated field experience, within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification.

Prerequisites: IHS 101 and IHS 404

IHS 406 Concentrated Field Experience3 (3 credits)

This is the third concentrated field experience, within the PLS 5th Edition Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s (BACB) Verified Course Sequence (VCS) BCaBA certification.

Prerequisites: IHS 101 and IHS 404 and IHS 201 and IHS 405

IHS 441 Alt Med/Non TraditionalTherapy (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the history and practice of complementary medicine and non-tradition therapies. Included will be an overview of the debate between eastern and western societal approaches to medicine, the relationship between mind and body in health and illness, how cultural issues affect the way individuals feel about and comply with their medical treatment, some of the non-traditional therapies used in the treatment of physical and psychological illness such as art and music therapy, and the overall emphasis on wellness promotion.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Globalization Course (New GEP), Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 458 Public Health & Epidemiology (3 credits)

This course introduces the basic principles and methodologies used in epidemiology and will demonstrate how these are applied to the field of public health. Topics to be covered will include historical perspectives of epidemiology, measures of disease occurrence and association, clinical epidemiology, disease screening, causal inference, and study design.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 466 ABA and Autism Treatment (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the current research-based interventions in the field of autism that include applied behavior analysis (verbal behavior, discrete trial instruction, picture communication, Pivotal Response Training, Competent Learner Model), TEACCH, and social skills. Students will gain a general understanding of applied behavior analysis principles and how they can be used across multiple environments (home, school, early intervention, clinics) to address the various social, behavioral and communication deficits of individuals with autism. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 467 Social Skills Dev. and Autism (3 credits)

Social skills are learned behaviors that individuals need to successfully navigate social interactions and relationships. This course introduces students to a variety of approaches for assessing and improving the social skills of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders. A variety of empirically validated methodologies will be discussed, including incidental teaching; video modeling; social stories; and using textual cues. Students will learn to apply these methodologies to teach skills such as joint attention, greetings, conversations, social play, self-awareness, perspective-taking, critical thinking, developing friendships, and community and home success. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 468 Resources &Advocacy for Autism (3 credits)

Intervention and therapeutic services are critical to improving the lives of children and adults, and advocating for individuals with autism is an important process in securing these services. This course introduces students to the role that therapists, physicians, families, case workers and community agents serve in advocating for those with autism, where services are provided, how they are funded, what they offer those with autism, and how to advocate for individuals with autism. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 469 Adult/Transition Autism Serv (3 credits)

This course focuses on understanding the issues facing adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Students will learn about issues adults with ASD face including independent living skills, friendships, sexual relationships and marriage, finding and coping with employment, secondary education, post-secondary education, psychiatric disturbances in adulthood, legal issues, and enhancing independence. Students will learn the newest research and intervention techniques to promote a successful transition to adulthood. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course.

IHS 470 Senior Seminar (3 credits)

IHS 471 Special Topics in Autism (3 credits)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), including Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Aspergers Syndrome, are common. The result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, ASD’s impact social interactions and communication skills. The types of ASD range in severity from very low functioning associated with significant cognitive deficits and highly disruptive behaviors, to very high functioning, associated with highly gifted intelligence and “quirky” behaviors. This course is a continuation of Intro to Autism Spectrum Disorder and provides advanced topics in the causes, treatments and implications of autism. The format for this course is seminar style. This will primarily consistent of significant student involvement.

Prerequisites: IHS 465

IHS 472 Seminar in Autism (4 credits)

In this course, important topics on Autism Spectrum Disorders will be discussed in more detail and students will design an individualized behavioral project. This project will help students to focus on the specific needs of children or adults with autism by developing particular types of goals, services, programs, or other relevant activities. This course will also involve designing a plan for working with individuals with autism to help improve the quality of their functioning in meaningful areas of their lives. In addition, this course will serve as the third practicum course for BCaBA certification. This course will also include the third practicum requirement for BCaBA certification. Only open to students completing the BCaBA sequence. Prerequisites: IHS 465; IHS 466; IHS 467; IHS 473; IHS 474 and Senior Status.

Prerequisites: IHS 465 and IHS 466 and IHS 467 and IHS 473 and IHS 474

IHS 473 Advanced Principles of ABA (4 credits)

This course is designed to expand upon the previously learned concepts of behavior analysis and connect it to the practical world for teachers and educators. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how to use the principles and practices of applied behavioral management in the classroom. Classroom-based examples and practices firmly grounded in research will be discussed. This course will address identifying target behavior, collecting and graphing data, functional assessment, experimental design, arranging antecedents and consequences, generalizing behavior change, and the importance of ethical considerations in using applied behavior analysis in the classroom. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze classroom examples that show teachers using applied behavior analysis techniques in different settings. This course will also include the first practicum requirements for BCaBA certification. Prerequisites: IHS 465, IHS 466, and IHS 467.

Prerequisites: IHS 466 and IHS 465 and IHS 467 (may be taken concurrently)

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 474 Functional Analysis and Ethics (4 credits)

This course is designed to expand upon the previously learned concepts of behavior analysis and will present the student with information on observation, data collection, and data interpretation. Students will learn the methods for obtaining descriptive data and the procedures for conducting systematic manipulations. Functional assessments and analysis of individual behaviors will be a primary focus. Specific single subject experimental designs will be discussed. The ethical considerations inherent in behavioral assessment, treatment, and research will be reviewed. This course will also include the second practicum requirements for BCaBA certification. Prerequisites: IHS 465, IHS 466, IHS 467, and IHS 473.

Prerequisites: IHS 465 and IHS 466 and IHS 467 and IHS 473 (may be taken concurrently)

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 475 Coping with Autism (3 credits)

This course explores how families and service providers cope with autism. The impact of autism on parents, siblings, grandparents and others close to the family is discussed, particularly around coping with the behaviors associated with autism and the reactions of others. In addition, how families cope with complex issues such as school placement and support services, respite time, marital relationships, economics of paying for services and other important and difficult issues faced by those who care for children and adults with autism are presented. Finally, the impact on service providers and their strategies for effective coping are explored.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 480 ABA Practicum I (3 credits)

IHS 480F ABA Practicum I supervision (0 credits)

IHS 481 ABA Practicum II (3 credits)

IHS 481F ABA Practicum II supervision (0 credits)

IHS 482 ABA Practicum III (3 credits)

IHS 482F ABA Practicum III supervision (0 credits)

IHS 490 Internship in IHS (3 credits)

Internship in Interdisciplinary Health Services permits students to focus on a particular area of interest within the Health Services Department. Students choose from a range of interesting topics and interests so that students may focus at a deeper level in a particular academic area. Students benefit from both the academic side as well as the practical side while also gaining actual hands-on skills, thereby achieving a variety of topics that will direct students toward skill-based promotion and practical applications for potential employment.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 491 Internship in Autism Studies (3 credits)

The course will provide students with direct, hands-on experience in working with children and/or adults with autism in a highly supervised, instructional setting. Offered in the summer only. Permission of the Director is required.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

IHS 493 Independent Study (3 credits)

Students who have completed four regular semesters with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field) may, with the prior approval of the chairs and Dean's office concerned, register each semester for one upper division course in the major field (or a closely related field) to be taken in the Independent Study/Directed Readings or Research/Tutorial format. Such courses are offered to enrich the student's major program and not as a special arrangement to facilitate a student's fulfillment of course or credit requirements. Additional conditions are described in Guidelines for Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Similar Courses issued by the appropriate Dean's Office.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 494 Independent Study (3 credits)

Students who have completed four regular semesters with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field) may, with the prior approval of the chairs and Dean's office concerned, register each semester for one upper division course in the major field (or a closely related field) to be taken in the Independent Study/Directed Readings or Research/Tutorial format. Such courses are offered to enrich the student's major program and not as a special arrangement to facilitate a student's fulfillment of course or credit requirements. Additional conditions are described in Guidelines for Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Similar Courses issued by the appropriate Dean's Office.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 495 Seminar in Inter Health Svc (3 credits)

This course is offered as one of the final courses in the Interdisciplinary Health Services major to provide students with a solid platform in leadership, professionalism, and career development. Course content is based upon two overarching educational goals. The first major goal is to synthesize key themes and information that constitute the IHS curriculum, allowing students to review critical concepts and material. The second major goal is to help students transition from their undergraduate environment to the world of professional careers in health care; professional education in various clinical fields; or graduate education in health administration, public health, or health education. Prerequisites: IHS 110, 211, 323.

Prerequisites: (IHS 2101 or IHS 110) and (IHS 2231 or IHS 323 or SOC 323) and (IHS 2111 or IHS 211) and (IHS 2311 or IHS 331 (may be taken concurrently))

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate