Health Studies

Department Overview

Saint Joseph's University Department of Health Studies offers programs leading to the Bachelor's degree in Health Studies; Bachelor's degree in Liberal Studies in Health Administration; Master's degree in Health Administration, Master's degree in Health Education, and Master's of Science degree in Health Informatics. The department prepares students to become dedicated health professionals with the goal of advancing individual and population health through evidence-based programs and treatments, health policy, and health administration. Courses are taught by a team of faculty members with many years of experience in a variety of healthcare fields. Our goal is to empower students with knowledge of health and disease, healthcare systems, and health programs and policies in order that they may create their own unique pathway to success.

Mission Statement

Consistent with our Jesuit roots and Ignatian goals of education, the Health Studies program is built on a liberal arts foundation with an emphasis on ethics,  social justice, and professional competency. By enhancing skills in verbal communication, writing, critical thinking, quantitative analysis, globalization, and diversity, health services graduate programs prepare graduates to confront current and emerging issues in healthcare.

Interim Chair:  Sally Kuykendall, PhD, RN, CHES

HAD 101 Intro to Health Administration (3 credits)

An introduction to health care services focusing on current components, practices, issues, and trends in the health delivery system. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, economic, legal, and technological forces that affect health care.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 110 Public Health Epidemiology (3 credits)

This course introduces the basic principles and methods of epidemiology. Topics include historical perspectives of epidemiology, measures of disease occurrence and association, clinical epidemiology, disease screening, causal inference, and study designs. Students will apply epidemiological principles to public health practice using critical thinking and analytical skills.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 115 Research Methods in HAD (3 credits)

Health Services Research explores the history of health research, basic principles and types of research in order that health administrators will be able to critically evaluate research in healthcare. This course is a combination of lecture, discussion and experiential learning designed to instill a critical understanding of the research process for application to professional practice.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 120 Fin Mgt Hlth Care Organization (3 credits)

An advanced application of the current issues and techniques affecting financial management in the health care system. Topics include cost accounting, cost benefit analysis, accountability in not-for-profit/non-profit institutions, prospective and third party payments, management information systems for operational and fiscal control, and cost containment.

Prerequisites: HAD 100 or HAD 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 200 Healthcare Law and Ethics (3 credits)

An overview of the legal and ethical issues central to the health care delivery system and their impact on individual institutions and professionals. The relationships among biomedical and research technology, societal changes, court rulings, and governmental legislation within the context of the health care system will be examined.

Prerequisites: HAD 100 or HAD 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 210 Plan & Mktg Health Care Org (3 credits)

An introduction to general strategic planning and marketing for health care systems with particular emphasis on the evolution from a provider-controlled environment to a consumer market. Review of key factors such as rising costs, increasing competition, legislation/regulation, technological advancements, and increased consumer sophistication.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 220 Health Policy (3 credits)

An overview of how health care policy is enacted in the U.S. Analysis of how the expansion of government programs and regulations since 1965 have influenced health care delivery. Emphasis will be placed on current policy questions and important health care policy debates.

Prerequisites: HAD 100 or HAD 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 301 Health Info Mgmt Systems (3 credits)

A critical skill for health administrators is to be able to gather, organize, analyze and safely store important health information. This course provides an overview of healthcare information management and applications within healthcare organizations.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 310 Seminar in Hlth Administration (3 credits)

Taken with the Practicum, this course is the capstone for integration between theory and practice of health administration. Each student will be responsible for the preparation of a research paper on a topic in health administration. Topics of emphasis will include health services research, administration in health settings, organizational development, human resource development, and current issues relevant to student field practicums. Students must have permission before enrolling.

Prerequisites: (HAD 101 and (HAD 110 and (HAD 200 and (HAD 120 or HAD 210 or HAD 220

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 370 Special Topics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 470 Special Topics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

HAD 552 Health Administration (3 credits)

An introduction to the principles of administration within health and human services organizations and the basic concepts of leadership and organizational theories relevant to effective administration of healthcare institutions. Organizations are viewed as open systems requiring constant interactions with the environment. Considerable emphasis is placed on quality improvement and organizational change.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 553 Health Care Organization (3 credits)

An overview of the organization, structure, and financing of the healthcare delivery system in the United States. The various elements comprising the system will be presented, along with an exploration of the basic concepts and measures of health, disease, needs, quality, and utilization. Issues in healthcare resourcing, institutions, and system organization will be examined.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 554 Health Care Law (3 credits)

An examination of the major legal issues encountered in the health care field by administrators and practitioners. Among the topics to be included are principles of liability, legal aspects of medical ethics, and legislative and regulatory factors in health care delivery.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 555 Acc for Health Care Organiztns (3 credits)

An introduction to basic accounting techniques used in the healthcare industry.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 556 Fin Manag of Health Care Org. (3 credits)

An introduction to the basic theories and practices of financial management as they relate to healthcare organizations. Course includes budgeting principles.

Prerequisites: HAD 555

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 557 Health Care Strat Plan & Mktg (3 credits)

An introductory course that examines the foundations, principles, and basic applications of this field. Internal and external forces that shape marketing policies and planning are explored. Topics include the development of marketing strategies and programs, as well as marketing mix variables and general healthcare planning.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 558 Hospital Administration (3 credits)

In depth study of hospital operations with emphasis on not-for profit/nonprofit settings; focus on departmental operations, role of administration, the board, and medical staff. Includes legal and reform trends affecting hospitals, financial mechanisms, budgeting, labor relations and corporate restructuring.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 559 Health Policy (3 credits)

The formulation and analysis of health policy at federal, state, local, and corporate levels. This course presents an overview of the legislative, regulatory, and political processes and their effect on the health care system. This course will provide a conceptual and analytic framework for bioethical policy analysis regarding policy formulation, adoption, implementation, operation, evaluation, and termination. Pragmatic application of policy analysis tools is included.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 600 Ethics of Health Care (3 credits)

A critical examination of the central ethical issues in the healthcare field. Issues to be treated include euthanasia, life-prolonging medical technologies, abortion, screening for genetic defects, experimentation and informed consent, distribution of scarce medical resources, the right to healthcare, and its implications for the healthcare delivery system. Necessary background in moral philosophy will be provided.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 601 Fieldwork in Health Admin (3 credits)

Students who have a GPA of 3.5 or higher may pursue experiential learning through fieldwork or internship in an approved healthcare facility or nonprofit organization.

Prerequisites: HAD 552 and HAD 553 and HAD 554 and HAD 555 and HAD 556 and (HAD 560 or MHI 560) and HAD 600 and HSV 550 and HSV 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 602 Directed Resrch in Health Serv (3 credits)

The Health Services Department provides opportunities for selected students to conduct independent research under the supervision of department faculty. Students desiring to participate in Directed Research must identify and meet with a faculty mentor, submit a formal research proposal with proposed timeline for completion, and obtain approval for the project from the faculty mentor, program director, department chair and associate dean.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HAD 700 Health Administration Capstone (3 credits)

An integrative capstone course in which the student is expected to integrate and synthesize prior course work and to demonstrate competence in health administration through the analysis of complex cases in health services delivery and management and the development of a case of his/her own based on experience and observation. Integrative Capstone should be taken as the final course in the curriculum.

Prerequisites: HAD 552 and HAD 553 and HAD 555 and HAD 556 and HAD 560 and HAD 600 and HSV 550 and HSV 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 550 Hist & Phil Med & Pub Health (3 credits)

History and Philosophy of Medicine and Public Health traces the evolution of health promotion efforts from early civilizations, the Greco-Roman period, Middle Ages, and the Renaissance to current times. Course content covers infectious and chronic diseases, occupational health, maternal and child health, and the development of healthcare professions and institutions throughout history. Students will explore local treasures, such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Mütter Museum, the Penn Museum, and the African American Museum in Philadelphia, as conditions allow.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 551 Map Hlth Res, Pln, Pol Dev&Mkt (3 credits)

Based on the ARCVIEW Geographic Information Systems (GIS), this course is a practical introduction to the use of computer mapping and spatial analysis. The course uses the most current GIS technology to understand the environment and how it impacts public health. There is a large computer lab component to the course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 552 Epidemiology and Com Health (3 credits)

An introductory course exploring the basic concepts of epidemiology as a public health science, including rates and ratios, risk and association, causation and investigation of outbreak.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 553 Program Planning for Wellness (3 credits)

A foundation course in the development of health education programs for hospitals, work sites, community, and schools. Discusses models for health behavior, assessment of health education needs, design and implementation of interventions, program marketing, and evaluation of efficacy.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 554 Curric Strat for Hlth Educatrs (3 credits)

Techniques combining the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains in individual and group learning are discussed. Leading models for curriculum development and implementation are emphasized. Mechanics for construction of goals, curriculum design, objective writing, and learning behaviors are stressed. Models for evaluation and needs analysis are examined. The role of the trainer in the organization is also explored, along with strategies for maximizing one’s position in the organization. Ethical, legal, and moral questions arising in the health education arena are examined.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 555 Essentials: Population Health (3 credits)

This comprehensive course focuses on preparing health professionals with the foundational skills needed to work in teams to effectively collaborate and coordinate care in population health management. Special emphasis will be on identification and stratification of populations at risk; evidence-based care, care coordination, patient and community engagement, and data analytics and reporting of outcomes. Key themes of multidisciplinary communication, collaboration, leadership, and professionalism will be ingrained throughout content. National standards and initiatives form the foundation to the course.

HED 556 Foundations of Global Health (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health and how health status is measured. Students will also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course will cover key concepts and frameworks but be very practical in orientation. The course will be global in coverage with a focus on low-and middle-income countries and on the health of the poor domestically and abroad.

HED 557 Determinants: Health-Behavior (3 credits)

The focus of the program is on the interaction of biological, behavioral, sociocultural, and environmental variables in the etiology and prevention of health problems and in the promotion of healthy human development. The program is designed to cultivate competence in basic and applied research, in the evaluation of bio-behavioral health intervention strategies, and in university teaching. Graduates are prepared for research, teaching, or policy roles in health care settings, private and public research laboratories, government agencies, and universities including medical schools.

HED 558 Mental Illness and Addictions (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of a range of theories/models of mental health/addiction treatment, with an emphasis placed on psychotherapeutic approaches. The theory of pathology, theory of change, practice of therapy and common therapeutic strategies arising from each approach will be highlighted. The benefits, limitations, efficacy outcomes and contraindications of each approach will also be explored. The course also includes a brief overview of critical assessments of common approaches to addictions/mental health treatment and an introduction to Recovery-oriented practice in mental health treatment.

HED 559 Human Aging and Dying (3 credits)

This course focuses on the field of human aging. The course of study will include a multidisciplinary examination of the way in which human aging is viewed – how we perceive the process of growing older and how society responds to the issues of aging. The course will look at aging from multiple perspectives that include the social, political and biological sciences, arts and humanities, care giving and social services. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these issues will become prominent with the advent of the Baby Boomers.

HED 561 Human Sexuality (3 credits)

Content provides sexual awareness and personal growth in the area of interpersonal sexuality. Through participation in a variety of class activities, students increase comfort level in communicating about sexual attitudes, feelings, and behaviors. Sexually transmitted infections, reproductive inefficiencies, and cultural issues are discussed.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 562 Hlth Care of Childrn in Commun (3 credits)

HED 564 Health Communications (3 credits)

This course focuses on the development of effective health communications. Topics include identifying the health needs and communication channels of the target audience, creating SMART communication objectives, creating messages using communication theories or models, use of current and emerging technologies, message delivery and impact or outcome evaluation. Students will apply their knowledge to a health communication message and pilot the message to one or more small groups.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 571 Employee Asst & Occup Health (3 credits)

An overview course designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to help organize, develop, manage, and evaluate employee assistance programs. Emphasis is placed on the positive role of health promotion as a preventive tool. Course explores the role of addictions, family, financial, and legal issues in the life of the impaired employee or student and codependent.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 573 Women and Health Care (3 credits)

Inquiry into the health needs of women and their treatment by the health care system. Study includes history, role of women as healers, epidemiology, access to and utilization of health care services, health research, and legislation affecting women’s health issues.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 574 Concepts of Nutrition & Health (3 credits)

A comprehensive examination of the principles of good nutrition during the life cycle. Emphasis is placed on practical applications, including the use of food composition theory to evaluate food intakes, regional, cultural, and religious influences on food habits, fads, preventive health promotion, and health restoration through health education.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 575 Stress and Crisis Management (3 credits)

Study of health problems related to stress and exploration of methods to reduce the impact of stressors to improve bio-psychosocial health. Demonstrates how to identify, isolate, and manage a crisis and how to foresee future crises, as well as how to develop contingency plans. Physiology of stress, relaxation, biofeedback, fear control, and cognitive reacting are skills studied in relation to stress management.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 577 Health Education in HIV/AIDS (3 credits)

The retrovirus of AIDS, the people, and the society it infects are the center upon which this course is based. Current public health policy, ethics, and politics of AIDS are examined. Emphasis is placed on skill-building in health education, counseling, and referrals for persons with AIDS, their families, and those individuals who test positive. The school and corporate sectors are explored, as well as high risk groups and global AIDS.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 600 Dir Research in Hlth Ed (3 credits)

An opportunity to conduct a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Note: students may register for a directed research study only after (a) submitting a research proposal to the program director; (b) arranging for a faculty member to serve as mentor; and (c) receiving explicit approval from the department chair.

HED 601 Fieldwork in Health Education (3 credits)

Individually arranged fieldwork in approved health education environment. Students need permission of the program director before registering. The program is designed to meet individual professional goals and may only be taken once during a student’s completions of this degree program. All five core courses must be taken prior to enrolling in this course.

HED 700 Health Education Capstone (3 credits)

Health Education Capstone is the final course in Health Education program. Course content covers professional standards of practice, Certified Health Education Specialist Examination preparation, connection with Saint Joseph’s University Career Development Center services, and completion of a health education program in the community.

Prerequisites: HED 551 and HED 552 and HED 553 and HED 557

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HED 770 Special Topics in Hlth Educatn (3 credits)

The learning objectives of this course will be geared toward a specific topic of current interest in the field of health education. The specific topics and perquisites will be announced in the course schedule.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HSV 550 Health Services Research (3 credits)

Explores the history of health research, basic principles and types of research in order that health professionals will be able to critically evaluate research in their respective fields. This course is a combination of lecture, discussion and experiential learning designed to instill a critical understanding of the research process for application to clinical practice.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HSV 551 Managed Health Care (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to managed care including current and evolving models, terminology, and differences among insurers and payer types. The course will focus on the use of financial incentives to restrain healthcare costs and the role of utilization review, peer review, provider.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

HSV 700 Integ Capstne Crs in Hlth Serv (3 credits)

An integrative capstone course in which the student is expected to integrate and synthesize prior course work and to demonstrate competence in health services through the analysis of complex cases in health services delivery and management and the development of a case of his/her own based on experience and observation. Integrative Capstone should be the final course in the curriculum.

Prerequisites: HAD 552 and HAD 553 and HAD 555 and HAD 556 and HAD 560 and HAD 600 and HSV 550 and HSV 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

IHS 110 Intro Health Prof Practice (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the use of models and theories in the health professions as they apply to evidence-based programs and practices. Students selects and explore an acute or chronic health issue, investigate the problem from an epidemiological perspective, apply a relevant health behavior model or theory, and develop suggestions for practice. Course content includes the medical and public health models, Health Belief Model, Stages of Change, Diffusion of Innovations, Social Cognitive Theory, Health Communications, and ecological theories of health behavior. Staff from the Career Development Center present information on career exploration and internships.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 150 First Year Sem Global Health (3 credits)

This is a first year seminar course designed to introduce non-major students to several major themes of the health care system. It offers a comparative study of the American health care system with health care systems of other countries, providing an assessment of macro health care issues which include the social, political, and cultural foundations for health care, the economics of health care delivery, the ethical frameworks countries use to establish their interpretation of acceptable performance and behavior, the process by which the United States and other countries develop and implement their health policies, and what are now global trends for health care regardless of historical past, political system, or social cultures. The course requires significant analysis and critical review, and literature reviews to study the unique aspects of the American health care system and how this system compares to those of other countries.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Globalization Course, Undergraduate

IHS 211 Health Care Systems (3 credits)

An introduction to public health and the organization and structure of the health care delivery system in the United States. This course will focus upon the various types of health care services, where these services are provided, ways to assess and keep track of diseases and public health care needs, health policies, and administration of these services. Also included will be a discussion of how legal, economic, psychological, cultural, political, ethical, and technological forces affect health care and the people who provide it. An introduction to managed care including current and evolving models, terminology, and differences among insurers and payer types will be included. Staff from the Career Development present information on resume writing, internships, and other experiential learning opportunities.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 216 Alcohol, Drugs and Society (3 credits)

This course explores substance use from the neurological, biological, and social perspectives. Content covers individual and social factors related to substance abuse and evidence-based policies and programs to treat and prevent the disorder. Examples of topics discussed include opioid addiction, adolescent substance abuse, and binge drinking.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 217 Soc Determinants Mental Health (3 credits)

This course examines the connections between mental health and society. What are the major forms of mental and behavioral health and illness? How widespread are mental disorders and what predicts their occurrence? What impact do they have on society and institutions such as health care and criminal justice? How does mental illness relate to social norms? What roles do psychiatric diagnoses play in society and how do diagnoses affect individuals relative to society?

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 244 Health Information Technology (3 credits)

Health care increasingly engages in the use of information technology to collect, maintain, and analyze clinically relevant health data. This course is designed to present students with several real life scenarios with a focus on practical and applied uses of health information technology. Students will utilize a simulated electronic health record (EHR) to enter data, recall clinically relevant information for the purpose of analyzing data, and gain an understanding of how health care is transitioning to a focus on quality and outcomes utilizing information technology. Upon completion of the course, students should understand terminology related to technology commonly used in the health care setting, analyze and evaluate health data to draw conclusions, and apply technology focused solutions to support outcomes focused patient care.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 248 Health of School Aged Children (3 credits)

This course explores the specific health needs of children and opportunities for health promotion and disease prevention in schools and communities. Course content covers the health issues of infectious diseases, chronic illnesses, injuries, and adverse childhood experiences and the use of evidence-based programs and practices in improving children's health.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 251 Healthcare Law and Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of legal and ethical issues central to the health care delivery system and their impact on individual institutions and professionals. The relationships among biomedical and technology, societal changes, court rulings, and governmental legislation within the context of the healthcare system will be examined. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive, Justice Ethics and the Law , Undergraduate

IHS 252 Health Policy (3 credits)

This course will explore health care policy issues (such as Medicare, Social Security, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, AIDS/HIV programs) and lead to a general understanding of the health care policy process. Focus will be placed on examining the various factors that lead to health care policy at the state and national level, and how health care policy impacts health care professionals’ ability to deliver care and consumers’ ability to utilize care in an ever-changing environment. The role of the political process to address issues revolving around cost of health care, access to and quality of that care will be addressed.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 253 Nutrition: Health & Disease (3 credits)

Nutrition: Health & Disease introduces the basic concepts of nutrition, the functions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water in the body, and the role of diet in health and disease. Health topics include heart disease, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, protein energy malnutrition, disordered eating and food safety. The content material of IHS 253 Nutrition: Health and Disease overlaps with the content of CHM 110 Food Chemistry I and CHM 111 Food Chemistry II. Students may take either Nutrition or Food Chemistry, not both.

Restrictions: Students cannot enroll who have a major in Food Marketing.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 256 HIV/AIDS (3 credits)

The HIV/AIDS course offers students the opportunity to explore one of the most critical public health issues facing the world today. Topics include epidemiology of HIV/AIDS, pathogenesis, the social and political history of the disease, modes of transmission, opportunistic infections, ethical issues, and global responses. This class will include site visits to local agencies in the Philadelphia area as well.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive, Undergraduate

IHS 276 Health of the Aging Adult (3 credits)

This course will focus on the demographic, political, economic and biopsychosocial issues of aging adults from community-based services to home care, hospice, hospital and nursing home settings. The course will focus on the interventions that health providers can use to maximize safety, function and social stability in the community, deferring or delaying institutionalization. Specific topics include fall prevention, medication safety, telemedicine applications, HIV prevention, cognitive function, nutrition, quality of life and the quality of care.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 285 Med Terminology & Health Comm (3 credits)

Ongoing advancement in the allied health professions dictates the need for students to understand proper medical and anatomical terminology to include its source language, evolution and application in the field of medicine and allied health. The need to understand proper medical and anatomical terminology is imperative as this language provides proficient communication between members of the same profession, minimizing the potential for misinterpretation in such a highly critical field. This course will introduce and educate students to a substantial medical vocabulary comprised of prefixes (location of an organ, the number of parts, or time involved), word roots (body part) and suffixes (condition, disease process, or procedure) which are utilized by health care practitioners as a devoted language. This course will describe the human body, coupled components, conditions, processes and medical treatments; providing the proper medical vocabulary for each.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 323 Health and Society (3 credits)

Health and health care are of central concern in a post-industrial society. This course examines sociological issues in health and health care, with special focus on the contemporary United States. This course will examine key social factors (known as the social determinants of health) that influence physical and mental health including race, gender, and social class. Also examined are ways in which health and health care become major social problems, and what are the prospects for major social change in society’s response to health issues? During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of a diversity, non-western or globalization course.

Attributes: Diversity Course, Undergraduate

IHS 331 Health Studies Research (3 credits)

This course teaches critical thinking and writing skills by introducing students to research methods in health and medicine. The course covers human participant protections, research designs, instrumentation, quantitative and qualitative data analyses, and communication of study findings. Students are responsible for selecting a health problem of interest, gathering and critiquing current research, writing a literature review and developing a research proposal. Throughout the course, students will review research articles investigating health disparities and other social justice issues. This course fulfills the overlay requirement of a writing intensive course. Students are taught to write in the technical report format.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Autism Studies, Autism Studies, Health Care Ethics, Inter. Health Studies or Linguistics.

Attributes: Faith Justice Course, Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

IHS 345 DyingWell:The Hospice Movement (3 credits)

This course examines how people across cultures and throughout history have responded to the challenge of dying. It will examine cultural practices relating to treatment of the death and to care of the dying, as well as the process of confronting one’s own death from a psychological perspective. After describing the limitations of the traditional medical (curative) model’s approach to death, the course will study the hospice movement: its history, philosophy, and practices of caring. In addition to specific models and essential components of hospice care, administrative issues (legal, reimbursement, human resources) will be addressed. This course will include presentations by and interviews with hospice workers, as well as a survey of hospices in the metropolitan area. This course includes a weekly service-learning requirement.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 348 Foundations of Kinesiology (3 credits)

Foundations of Kinesiology introduces students to the basic physiological, psychological, sociological, and mechanical principles of human movement. Students will explore careers that involve kinesiology, which include physical education, physical therapy, nursing, athletic training, and sports nutrition.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 354 Diversity Ldrship in Hlth Care (3 credits)

The impact of valuing diversity and multiculturalism is profound in the healthcare field. Research has long suggested that health outcomes and health services delivery are improved when caregivers and managers integrate genuine valuing of diversity in their operations. This course offers students the means to develop effective awareness, knowledge and sensitivity concerning diversity and multiculturalism. It provides strategies and insights allowing students to build their leadership skills in this critical area and then apply such knowledge and competencies in the field itself.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 359 Health Program Planning (3 credits)

Community health education programs are a cost effective way to prevent injuries and diseases. This course takes students through the process of health promotion planning including theoretical foundations, needs assessment, program development, and evaluation. Development and implementation of a health promotion project is a core component of the course. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based programs and practices.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 360 Animal Therapy (3 credits)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of animals in formal roles of support within society. Various levels of animal-assisted interventions and their legal implications, including Emotional Support Animals, Animal-Assisted Activities, Animal-Assisted Therapy, and Service Animals will be reviewed. The role of animals providing services to people with autism spectrum disorders, children with cancer, individuals with psychiatric disorders, the elderly, and individuals with physical disabilities will be discussed. The history of Animal-Assisted interventions leading up to their current status will be addressed.

Prerequisites: PSY 208 or SOC 217

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 368 Just Hlth Care Dev Nations (3 credits)

An investigation of adequate health care as a fundamental human right. The course will proceed from the premise that socially induced needs are a result of historical development of material and social conditions, coupled with a social consensus that some things are necessary for happiness, social life, or some other goal. It will consider the inability of many societies to supply adequate health care as an issue of basic personal dignity, a claim against society, and as a matter of justice. The course will examine the issue of just health care for all peoples from both public health and ethical perspectives.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive, Globalization Course, Health Care Ethics Course, Justice Ethics and the Law , Latin American Studies Course, Undergraduate

IHS 370 Special Topics: Health Studies (3 credits)

Special Topics in Health Services explores a specialized area of health care or an emerging or re-emerging health issue. The topic for a given semester will be announced prior to registration. This course may be taken more than once with permission of the Health Studies Chair.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 441 Complementary & Alt Med (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the history and practice of complementary medicine and non-traditional therapies. Included will be an overview of the debate between eastern and western societal approaches to medicine, the relationship between mind and body in health and illness, how cultural issues affect the way individuals feel about and comply with their medical treatment, some of the non-traditional therapies used in the treatment of physical and psychological illness such as art and music therapy, and the overall emphasis on wellness promotion.

Attributes: Diversity Course, Globalization Course, Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 458 Public Health & Epidemiology (3 credits)

This course introduces the basic principles and methods of epidemiology. Topics include historical perspectives of epidemiology, measures of disease occurrence and association, clinical epidemiology, disease screening, causal inference, and study designs. Students will apply epidemiological principles to public health practice using critical thinking and analytical skills.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 490 Internship in Health Studies (3 credits)

Internship in Interdisciplinary Health Studies permits students to focus on a particular area of interest within the Health Studies Department. Students choose from a range of interesting topics and interests to provide a deeper level of understanding. This course requires 112 hours of work at the internship site, regular journal reporting, clear learning objectives, and completion of a final project. Students benefit from both the academic side as well as the practical side by gaining hands-on experience for future employment.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior. Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 493 Independent Study (3 credits)

Students who have completed four regular semesters with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field) may, with the prior approval of the chairs and Dean's office concerned, register each semester for one upper division course in the major field (or a closely related field) to be taken in the Independent Study/Directed Readings or Research/Tutorial format. Such courses are offered to enrich the student's major program and not as a special arrangement to facilitate a student's fulfillment of course or credit requirements. Additional conditions are described in Guidelines for Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Similar Courses issued by the appropriate Dean's Office.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 494 Independent Study (3 credits)

Students who have completed four regular semesters with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field) may, with the prior approval of the chairs and Dean's office concerned, register each semester for one upper division course in the major field (or a closely related field) to be taken in the Independent Study/Directed Readings or Research/Tutorial format. Such courses are offered to enrich the student's major program and not as a special arrangement to facilitate a student's fulfillment of course or credit requirements. Additional conditions are described in Guidelines for Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Similar Courses issued by the appropriate Dean's Office.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 495 Seminar in Health Studies (3 credits)

This course is offered as one of the final courses in the Interdisciplinary Health Studies major to provide students with a solid platform in leadership, professionalism, career development, and community outreach. Course content is based upon two overarching educational goals. The first major goal is to synthesize key themes and information that constitute the IHS curriculum, allowing students to review critical concepts and material. The second major goal is to help students transition from their undergraduate environment to the world of professional careers in health care; professional education in various clinical fields; or graduate education in health administration, public health, or health education. This course partners with Career Development Center staff to offer best practices in resume writing and a panel presentation of IHS alumnae. All students are expected to develop a community-based service/research project for presentation.

Prerequisites: IHS 110 and IHS 211 and (IHS 323 or SOC 323)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Inter. Health Studies.

Attributes: Undergraduate

MHI 560 Health Informatics (3 credits)

A survey of the current use of information technology in the clinical and management practice for the healthcare delivery enterprise. Students will become familiar with the basic terminology, strategies, and utilization of IT as a key component in the delivery of patient care in a simulated environment.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

MHI 561 Digital and Connected Health (3 credits)

A review of how patient centric technologies play a role in health and wellness. Students will become familiar with emerging trends in remote patient monitoring, telehealth, mobile applications (apps) and other novel technologies.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

MHI 562 Database for Health Care (3 credits)

This course provides hands on use of database management tools and structured query language (SQL). Specific applications will be explored with an emphasis placed on the practice of organizing, identifying, and uniting disparate sources of health care data.

Prerequisites: MHI 560 or HAD 560

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

MHI 563 Data Analysis for Health Care (3 credits)

Health care systems increasingly create and capture data necessitating a focus on data analysis for quality improvement. This course builds on data organization skills with an emphasis on analyzing process, outcomes, and relations captured in the health record and across other health related data elements. Students will use data visualization tools paired with quantitative data driven techniques which aid in addressing challenges associated with the Triple Aim in healthcare.

Prerequisites: MHI 560 or HAD 560 or MHI 562 (may be taken concurrently) or HAD 562 (may be taken concurrently)

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

MHI 564 Privacy&Security: Health Care (3 credits)

Regulatory and ethical condensations require healthcare practitioners to protect patient information. This course presents both the regulatory framework, technical requirements, and administrative responsibilities to adhere to established laws governing the collection and use of protected health information (PHI).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

MHI 565 Health Data Standards (3 credits)

Health information requires an understanding of various data standards to allow for the structure and exchange of health data. This course explores the approach and need for standards in the areas of eXtensible Markup Language (XML), laboratory information systems, radiology information systems, and electronic health records. There is a strong focus on the development and implementation of widely recognized clinical documentation formats using HL7 and FHIR based standards.

Prerequisites: MHI 560 or HAD 560

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

MHI 700 Health Informatics Capstone (3 credits)

The capstone course is the final class for students with an interest in the field of health informatics. Students will utilize skills and competencies gained across the curriculum to design strategies and approaches which help to leverage technology to deliver healthcare. Students will evaluate systems and work in coordinated groups based on the persona of senior healthcare executives

Prerequisites: (MHI 560 or HAD 560) and (MHI 561 or HAD 561) and (MHI 563 or HAD 563) and (MHI 562 or DSS 630 or CSC 621) and (MHI 564 or HAD 564)