Education

Educator Preparation Program Mission

Saint Joseph’s University Education Departments are comprised of Teacher Education, Special Education, and Educational Leadership, and are dedicated to preparing exemplary teachers, educational leaders, and educational researchers. The Departments seek to promote a vibrant intellectual community, recognized for preparing reflective teacher educators and leaders committed to social justice and democratic principles; acknowledged for quality undergraduate and graduate teaching, research, and scholarly contributions that enhance educational theory and practice in teacher education, educational leadership, special education, and related disciplines; known for leadership and other educational opportunities; and established as contributing outstanding professional service and outreach.

The Educator Preparation Program at Saint Joseph’s University is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to offer certification or endorsement in 20 areas across undergraduate and graduate levels. The programs are coordinated by and administered through the Dean of the School of Health Studies and Education, the Educator Preparation Committee, and the Departments of Teacher Education, Special Education, and Educational Leadership. The chair of each department coordinates the undergraduate program and each graduate program has a designated faculty program director.

Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework for the Educator Preparation Program is based on the theme, Teaching and Leading With Mind and Heart for the Common Good. This theme is the foundation of program and candidate development and assessment. Encapsulated within each of the three primary ideas of Mind, Heart, and Common Good are learning objectives that address specific kinds of knowledge, skills, and dispositions that will be the focus of development for aspiring teachers and school leaders. 

Teaching and Leading with the Mind (Reason)

Educators with and for others need to be intellectually curious, life-long learners who are knowledgeable about the world and about the theories and practices related to human development, pedagogy, supportive learning environments, assessment, and leaderships (Darling-Hammond, 2010). They must be reflective practitioners who are able to consider a variety of inputs, including their professional knowledge, understandings about particular students, and classroom observations. They must weigh these data and strive for discernment, or the ability to make wise, often immediate decisions. They must be critical thinkers who can read and interpret beyond the page, and who routinely question the status quo. 

Teaching and Leading with the Heart (Compassion)

Teaching and leading are deeply personal acts, engaging educators’ “emotions and identity as well as their intellect.” (p. 699, Feiman-Nemser, 2008). Educating from the heart requires seeing the humanity in the eyes of students and making a positive difference in their lives. As such, teaching and leading are not only compassionate endeavors, but moral ones as well. Compassion for students, caregivers, and colleagues, reflects the Ignatian value of cura personalis (care of the entire person) and the ideal of working “with” others and not “for” others. Passion is required for doing more, being more, and expecting more from self and others (the Magis). Compassion translates to having high expectations for self, students, and stakeholders in the educational process. 

Teaching and Leading for the Common Good (Social Justice)

Teachers and school leaders are agents who can deliver on the democratic promise of educational justice. This means understanding the inequalities that exist in society and schools and that all students do not have equal access to high quality education or the learning opportunities valued by schools. Acting with a sense of purpose means recognizing and offsetting these injustices through teaching and leadership efforts. Educators’ work involves being cultural mediators who validate students’ knowledge traditions while also helping students acclimate to the culture of school. It also means working as student advocates and teacher activists by challenging injustices that undermine students’ and teachers’ learning (Cochran-Smith, 2010). 

Department of Teacher Education

Dr. Suniti Sharma, Chair and Professor

Undergraduate Majors

  • Elementary Education PK-4
  • Middle Years Education: 4-8
  • Art Education PK-12
  • Secondary Education 7-12
  • Foreign Language Education PK-12
  • Childhood Studies

 Adult Undergraduate

  • Early Childhood/Elementary Education PK-4
  • Childhood Studies

Undergraduate Minors

  • Educational Studies

Graduate

  • Master of Science in Education in Early Childhood/Elementary Education PK-4 and Graduate Teacher Certification Program
  • Master of Science in Education in Elementary/Middle Education (4-8) and Graduate Teacher Certification Program
  • Master of Science in Education in Secondary Education 7-12 and Graduate Teacher Certification Program
  • Master of Science in Education in Foreign Language PK-12 and Graduate Teacher Certification Program
  • Master of Science in Art Education PK-12 and Graduate Teacher  Certification Program
  • Master of Education in Professional Education
  • Master of Science with Reading Specialist Certification
  • Program Specialist Certificate in English as a Second Language
  • (Options: Master of Science in Education with certification; Master of Science without certification; and certification only)

Department of Special Education

Dr. Virginia G. Johnson, Chair
Department of Special Education

Graduate Programs 

Dr. James Johnson, Graduate Advisor

Undergraduate Major

  • Special Education: PK-8

Undergraduate Minor

  • Special Education Studies

Graduate

The Master’s in Education degree program is designed for students who already have an undergraduate degree and a valid Pennsylvania Instructional I certification or are working towards a Pennsylvania Instructional PK-8 or 7-12 certification.

This graduate program provides the student with extensive preparation for working students with special needs in the classroom. The program has a dual focus, the preparation of special education teachers and the development of master teachers remaining in the regular education classroom. The required courses are determined during the initial advising conference. Students are required to complete at least 36 graduate credit hours.

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder Specialist Endorsement
  • Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program (with PK-12 Hearing Impaired Certification)
  • Master of Science in Special Education without certification
  • M.S. in Special Education - Teacher Scholar Low Incidence
  • M.S. in Special Education - Teacher Scholar High Incidence
  • Special Education: 7-12 Certification
  • Special Education: PK-8 Certification
  • Supervisor of Special Education Certification

Encarnacion Rodriguez, Chair

The Department of Educational Leadership

 
Guided by the values of discernment, continuous improvement, care of the whole person, social justice, democratic ideals, and service to others, the Educational Leadership Department is dedicated to cultivating future scholar practitioners.
 
Our program graduates as a community of learners aspire to hold key positions in which they can engage in reform and transformational leadership by informing practical experience with theoretical knowledge in a variety of settings, including but not limited to local, national, and international schools and organizations. Our future leaders are committed to leading with mind, hope, and heart. Our mission inspires living our best self in alignment with Jesuit ideals.
 
The Department of Educational Leadership offers programs at the graduate and post-graduate levels only in the following areas:

Interdisciplinary Doctor of Education Program for Educational Leaders (IDEPEL)

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) Program prepares transformational leaders across K-12, higher education, and social sector fields who are committed to equity-oriented change. Grounded in the values of social justice, scholar-practitioner, academic expectations with cura personalis (care of the whole person), and community/cohorts, the 60-credit curriculum emphasizes learning and applying leadership theories to practice, as well as developing critical skills for using and producing research, including a dissertation.
 
Students enrolled in the Ed.D. program can pursue one of the following concentrations: K-12 Education, Higher Education, or Social Sectors (e.g., Healthcare Leadership, Non-profit/Foundation Leadership, Criminal Justice Leadership, etc.). Students in the K-12 concentration can obtain Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) approved certifications in: Principal, Curriculum Supervisor, and Superintendent’s Letter of Eligibility.

M.S. in Educational Leadership and Administration

The M.S. in Educational Leadership and Administration program is a master’s program for aspiring education leaders that can be pursued in conjunction with one or more of the following PA certifications. Through the lens of equity, program participants learn to lead with their mind and heart to solve the complex educational challenges of the 21 st Century. Candidates will understand the role of theory in transforming practice, communicating effectively, fostering school-community collaboration, and understanding schools as professional communities.
 
Students in this program can pursue one of the following four concentrations:
 
  • General (30 credits)
  • Principal and Curriculum and Instruction PA Certification (30 credits)
  • Supervisor of Special Education PA Certification (30 credits)
  • Principal, Curriculum and Instruction and Supervisor of Special Education PA Certification (39 credits)

4+1 Programs (Bachelor’s/Master’s Program) for SJU Undergraduate Students

SJU’s  4+1 programs are accelerated bachelor's/master's programs that allow you to start earning your graduate degree during your senior year. This model enables you to complete your undergraduate and graduate work in just 5 years (hence, 4+1). The 4+1 teacher preparation programs allow undergraduate students at SJU to begin a master's degree as part of their undergraduate program.  Each of the teacher preparation  4+1 programs leads to a master’s degree and teacher certification.  Undergraduate students may take up to three graduate level courses (total of 9 credits) that will “double count” as elective undergraduate credits and as required credits in the graduate program.

The 4+1 programs in teacher preparation are:

  1. Master of Science in Education and Graduate Teacher Certification Program in Early Childhood/Elementary Education PK-4  (36 credits) Open to all Non-Education SJU majors. Courses that will double count are EDU 550, EDU 642, SPE 600
  2. Master of Science in Education and Graduate Teacher Certification Program in Secondary Education 7-12 (30 credits)Open to SJU majors in Biology, Chemistry, Math, English and History. Courses that will double count are EDU 550, EDU 557, SPE 600
  3. Master of Science in Education with Reading Specialist Certification. Open to all SJU majors. Non-Education SJU majors (33 credits) Courses that will double count are EDU 646, EDU 671, EDU 700. Education SJU majors (30 credits) Courses that will double count are EDU 671, EDU 700, and EDU 701 or 702.

Applications for the 4+1 are submitted to the graduate office using the link: www.sju.edu/gradapplynow When you select a qualifying 4+1 teacher preparation program you will have the option to select your concentration/grade.

All candidates must maintain a GPA of 3.0 upon entry and throughout the program and follow clearance guidelines for field experiences. Qualifying score in Praxis tests is required prior to applying to PDE for Instructional I Teaching Certification.

Candidates may elect to add a 16 credit ESL program specialist certificate to their graduate program of study. 

Clinical Experiences

An important component of educator preparation is developmental and sequential field experience, beginning with observation and culminating in student teaching. During clinical experiences candidates develop a sense of professional identity as educators, develop an understanding of the professional culture of schools, adopt professional practices, and conduct themselves in accordance with the policies and procedures of the school and district in which their placements occur.  The Director of Clinical Experiences works with academic departments to place students in schools where SHSE has clinical partnerships for field experiences, pre-student teaching, and student teaching. Students are required to complete clearances before any placements can occur.

Clearances

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires all pre-service teachers participating in clinical experiences (i.e.,  pre-student teaching, student teaching, practicum & internship, field experiences) to obtain clearances prior to beginning their placements in a PK12 school setting. Clearances must be obtained prior to placement and remain valid through the end of the placement. Clearances are valid for one calendar year. Students are responsible for updating their clearances as they progress through the academic program. 

  • All students must obtain PA clearances.  

  • Graduate students who are employed full-time with a school district (not on an emergency certificate), can provide a letter on school letterhead signed by either Human Resources, the Principal, or the Superintendent verifying that their clearances are submitted and in good standing with the school/district. 

  • Students should maintain a copy of clearances documentation for their records.

Required clearances:

  • FBI Criminal History Report

  • PA State Criminal History Record (Act 34)

  • PA Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151)

  • Proof of Tuberculin Skin Test 

Required child abuse training to be completed during clearances process:

  • Protecting Children: Identifying and Reporting Sexual Misconduct (valid for five calendar years)

Pennsylvania State Criminal History Record (Act 34)

To submit an online request for a Pennsylvania State Criminal History Record (Act 34), visit, https://epatch.state.pa.us. You will be able to log-in again within a few days and access your clearance. If you pick 'volunteer' as reason for applying for a clearance, the first clearance should be free of charge. There is a charge for future additional clearances.

Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151)

To complete the Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151) form, visit https://www.compass.state.pa.us/cwis/public/home. You will be able to log-in again within a few days and access your clearance. If you pick 'volunteer' as reason for applying for a clearance, the first clearance should be free of charge. You will have to pay for future additional clearances.

FBI Criminal History Report

To register online for the Federal FBI Criminal History Report, visit https://uenroll.identogo.com/. You must use the Service Code 1KG6RT to apply for the clearance. Applicants must register prior to going to the fingerprinting site location and schedule a fingerprinting session at the selected location. Locations of fingerprinting sites can also be found by clicking the link above. You will be able to log-in again within a few days and access your unofficial clearance. The unofficial clearance will suffice for uploading to Canvas and presenting for field experience clearances. Note: The actual FBI clearance stating any criminal history is required, not a copy of student fingerprints. 

Tuberculin Skin Test

Students can obtain a proof of Tuberculin Skin Test by visiting the Student Health Center in Quirk Hall on the SJU campus.

Protecting Children: Identifying and Reporting Sexual Misconduct

Students are required to complete training in child abuse reporting practices. Instructions and the link to the Protecting Children: Identifying and Reporting Sexual Misconduct  can be found https://learn.ue.org/HH0E1593465/SJUProtectingChildren.  Upon completion of the training, students receive a certificate that should be submitted with additional clearances document.

Field Experiences

Clinical experiences that occur at the beginning of a student’s training are referred to as field experiences. Specific courses within the educator preparation curriculum require students to complete observations and/or participate in microteaching experiences of theory, pedagogy and other relevant topics in school settings as part of the course requirements. In methods courses, candidates apply pedagogical practice in specific content areas under the guidance of school based teachers.

Pre-Student Teaching

Prior to the student teaching semester, students will be evaluated by a university supervisor who will conduct at least two formal observations of their teaching in a field based classroom setting. Students must apply for pre-student teaching and must successfully complete the pre-student teaching experience in order to progress through this gate to student teaching. Eligibility is based on good academic standing as determined by a cumulative 3.0 grade point average and successful completion of all prerequisite courses.

Student Teaching

During the student teaching semester, candidates are fully immersed in a classroom setting with guidance and support from a school based cooperating teacher and a university based supervisor while concurrently enrolled in a university based seminar course. Students will be evaluated by a university supervisor who will conduct at least four formal observations of their teaching in a field based classroom setting. Students must apply for student teaching. Eligibility is based on good academic standing as determined by a cumulative 3.0 grade point average and successful completion of all prerequisite courses, including the pre-student teaching observations.

Dispositional check process for candidates

Students applying for entrance into an educational program leading to certification will be required to complete disposition self reflections and will be assessed at multiple points about dispositions by a supervisor and/or instructor/advisor. Consistent with the conceptual framework, the educator preparation program evaluates dispositions in students in the following domains:

  • Intellectual curiosity and reflection

  • Communication skills

  • Professionalism

  • Collaboration

  • Ethical behavior

  • Social justice orientation

If students are found to need improvement or are demonstrating concerning behaviors in one of these domains, the program will develop a plan of action to address concerns. The plan of action may include additional learning experiences, additional observation and reflection, or in some cases counseling out of the program and into another area of study.

Professional Testing Requirements for Certification and Licensure

In addition to completing the prescribed program of study for certification in their respective areas, candidates are also required to successfully complete standardized tests in order to qualify for professional licenses and certifications. Testing requirements vary from state to state; therefore candidates must be alert to the requirements for any state in which they wish to be certified. Saint Joseph’s University’s educator preparation programs are aligned with Pennsylvania testing requirements.

Applying for Certification and Licensure

Saint Joseph’s University’s educator preparation programs are aligned with Pennsylvania testing requirements. The certification officer for the School of Health Studies and Education reviews, validates and fulfills all requests for certification and licensure. Candidates are encouraged to apply for certification as close to program completion as possible. Candidates applying for certification are required to meet certification requirements set by PDE at the time of their application for certification. Students may be required to complete additional coursework and/or field work to meet certification requirements. Students with coursework older than five years will also be reviewed by the program director for their certification area.

Student Score Reports

Students applying for certification in Pennsylvania must request that all test scores be sent directly from the testing company to the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). This is free of charge at the time of registration. PDE will only accept scores that have been received directly from the testing company. SJU will submit SAT and ACTscores to PDE after candidates provide evidence of their scores to the School of Health Studies and Education, Director of Assessment.

Admission to Candidacy

All students in programs leading to initial educator certification are required to be formally admitted into education programs. This formal admission is in addition to the admission to Saint Joseph’s University. Formal admission is a gateway called Admission to Candidacy. This status is granted by the School of Health Studies and Education after students have met specific program and Pennsylvania Department of Education requirements. Candidacy status is required before eligibility to take specific courses, including student teaching, and these courses are indicated by prerequisites within the course catalog. Students are expected to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of future educators. 

Admission to Candidacy Process

  • Undergraduate students typically apply by January 31 of their sophomore year using an online application. Undergraduate students, including transfer students, should contact their faculty advisor with questions about admission to candidacy. Students are required to meet with their advisors prior to applying for candidacy. A copy of the application form, completed by the student, is provided to the student’s academic advisor. The Director of Assessment notifies students of their application status.

  • Graduate students and students in 4+1 programs are evaluated for candidacy at application to the program. Graduate students should contact the graduate faculty program director with questions about admission to candidacy in graduate programs, including 4+1 programs.

Admission to Candidacy Requirements

Undergraduate Students

  • Complete at least 45 credit hours (including transfer credits)

  • Complete English 101 and English 102

  • Complete 6 credit hours in mathematics (SJU General Education Program (GEP) requires 3 credit hours of mathematics that may apply towards the total 6 credit hours required by the Education Program)

  • Earn a B- average (2.7) or better in all major courses taken

  • Earn a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 3.0

  • Achieve a qualifying score on a Pennsylvania Department of Education approved assessment for the Basic Skills Testing  Requirements in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics or satisfy the requirements through the alternatives policy. Questions about qualifying scores can be directed to the Director of Assessment in the School of Health Studies and Education. PDE approved assessments include:

    • PAPA

    • SAT

    • ACT

    • ETS Academic Core

Graduate Students

  • Complete a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a GPA of at least 3.0 

  • For art education, foreign language education and middle or secondary education students, provide evidence of completion of an undergraduate major, or required prerequisite coursework, in their chosen certification area

  • Graduate students should speak with their program directors regarding the timing of PDE required certification examinations during their programs of study.

Department of Teacher Education

Professor: Althier Lazar Ph.D.; Janine Firmender Ph.D.; Suniti Sharma Ph.D; Frank Bernt, Ph.D
Associate Professor: John Vacca Ph.D.; Stacy Olitsky Ph.D.
Assistant Professor: Kaitlin Moran Ph.D.; Virginia G. Johnson, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor of Practice:  Monica Belfatti Ph.D.

Department of Special Education

Associate Professor: Cheryl L. George Ph.D.
Assistant Professor: Jaclyn Galbally Ph.D.; Mary Erin Sheppard Ed.D.; Samantha Riggleman Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor: James R. Johnson Ed.D.; Julie Tibbitt Ph.D.

Department of Education Leadership

Professor: Aimee LaPointe Terosky Ed.D.; Aubrey Wang Ph.D.; Encarna Rodríguez Ph.D.Ed.D.
Associate Professor: Robert Palestini Ed.D.
Assistant Professor: Chris Heasley Ed.D.; James Coviello Ed.D.
 

EDL 600 Leadership for Social Justice (3 credits)

This course is an important opportunity for reflection, dialogue, and analysis intended to produce leaders who are critically-conscious and focused on making their schools and communities more just. The purpose of this course is to establish a historical, theoretical, and practical basis from which to critically analyze schools and school leadership practices. This course will strive to provide the tools to help leaders create more equitable schools and lead for social justice.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral or Graduate level students.

EDL 605 Critical Contemp Ed Issues (3 credits)

Current educational problems, trends and issues will be identified and addressed, especially as they relate to the different constituencies, organization and structure of both public and private schools, as well as to American society as a whole. Issues include, but are not restricted to: equal educational opportunity, educational choice and multicultural education. Emphasis will be placed on the values associated with the issues treated.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 655 Interpersonal Relations (3 credits)

A study of the dynamics of interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup relations. Emphasis will be placed on the teaching/learning process as well as the counselor/client relationship. A variety of instructional approaches, including lectures, discussions, and group activities will be utilized to develop interpersonal skills.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 660 Data-Informed Assessment (3 credits)

This course provides a detailed examination of the use of a variety of outcome measures and techniques to evaluate school programs and to assess the attainment of instruction/student achievement at several levels of education. Outcome assessment is discussed at the individual and school district level. Particular attention is focused on the leader’s grounding in standards-based reform, 21st Century skills and dispositions, and the ability to serve as a leader for data-informed assessment for decision making in the school. The individual learns how to access and use appropriate data to inform decision-making at all levels of the system through the use of technology and tools, multiple measures of data, and the interpretation and use of data to promote student learning.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 665 Transformational Leadership (3 credits)

This course introduces foundational knowledge about leadership theory and practice relative to organizational systems. Students also gain a research base of organizational theory, strategic planning, and foundations of building level instructional leadership. Content provides a framework for analyzing administrative and organizational structures, allowing for reflection of the theoretical base that informs future practice as school leaders. Cultivating ethical behavior in others through modeling and relationship development, gaining knowledge and comfort in becoming a leader in cultural competency, and demonstrating the capacity to collaboratively evaluate, develop, and communicate mission and vision-driven priorities in alignment with data use, technology, equity, diversity, digital citizenship, and community engagement are outcomes of this course focused on transformational leadership and organizational dynamics.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 670 Human Resources & Prof Growth (3 credits)

This course explores a foundational question related to human resources, the most-costly expenditure for a district/school: How do school leaders facilitate the professional growth of their staff in ways that benefit students? In order to explore this fundamental question, this course is organized around three overarching conceptual areas, including mission/vision, culture of learning, and social capital. This course will provide opportunities for practice aligned to the conceptual areas, including: recruiting, hiring, and retaining staff, designing professional development and evaluating staff, and facilitating teacher leadership and learning communities.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 675 Curriculum Develop & Practice (3 credits)

This course is designed to include the theories of curriculum, instruction, and the design of instructional systems. Emphasis will be placed on the translation of theory into practice. The use of evaluative techniques in the evolution and reform of instructional systems will be examined in detail. Focus on curriculum implementation in public and private schools will be emphasized.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 680 School Law, Policy, and Ethics (3 credits)

This course will focus upon the legal aspects of the school and its environment and on the paramount legal-educational issues currently facing the nation, especially as those related to policy determination and implementation. Particular attention will be given to the issues of contract, negligence, sexual harassment and students with disabilities law, as well as due process, collective bargaining, equal protection and establishment, and the legal rights and duties of administrators, faculty, and students. The ethical implications of school law will also be stressed.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 685 Leading School Curriculum (3 credits)

This course examines theoretical, historical and psychological underpinnings of curriculum development, as well as the practical application of designing, implementing, and assessing curriculum. In order to analyze the role of the school leader in leading curriculum in an equity-minded approach, this course will be structured around three central themes, including: the school leader as the architect of the design of curriculum through an equity-minded leadership lens, the school leader as the catalyst of curricular and instructional change through a data-informed leadership lens, and the school leader as the facilitator of curricular and instructional change through an empowerment and capacity-building lens. Within each theme, this course explores the theoretical foundations and the practical skills needed by school leaders to effectively administer curriculum and instruction in today’s school settings.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 690 Equitable Fiscal Allocation (3 credits)

Investigating economic theory to the study of education and market theory to education, partnerships, equitable allocation of resources, and the examination of educational enterprises are a focus of this course. Content on K-12 school finances including characteristics of revenue procurement, taxation for education, effective budget management, capital outlays, equity and adequacy of school funding, funding and student performance, vouchers, and labor market issues is covered.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 695 Internship I: Leaders/Action (3 credits)

EDL 695 is the first part of a two-semester professional internship that provides the candidate the opportunity to apply the practical skills needed to lead in PK-12 schools as principals and/or curriculum supervisors. Candidates collaborate with a site mentor and faculty advisor to develop these skills in a manner that draws on the candidates’ personal strengths and helps to develop the competencies required of practicing leaders. Particular attention is paid to the meeting of theory and practice as well as the creation of more just and equitable schools that serve the needs of all students.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 696 Internship II: Leaders/Action (3 credits)

EDL 696 is the second part of a two-semester professional internship that provides the candidate the opportunity to apply the practical skills needed to lead in PK-12 schools as principals and/or curriculum supervisors. Candidates collaborate with a site mentor and faculty advisor to develop these skills in a manner that draws on the candidates’ personal strengths and helps to develop the competencies required of practicing leaders. Particular attention is paid to the meeting of theory and practice as well as the creation of more just and equitable schools that serve the needs of all students.

Prerequisites: EDL 695

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDL 700 Edu Ldrship Special Topics (3 credits)

This course will address current issues in the field of Educational Leadership. Course content will be determined by instructor.

EDL 800 Prof Sem: Doctoral Studies (3 credits)

This course serves a multifaceted purpose including: introduction to the doctoral program mission and expectations; community building among students, faculty, and alumni; facilitation of interpersonal skills needed in inclusive cultures; development of organizational and study skills for success in doctoral work; and initial review of academic writing, including the structure of scholarly writing, APA style, and critical consumption of knowledge.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 805 Quantitative Research I (3 credits)

This course provides students with empirical research experience through a variety of quantitative measures and techniques. The first half of the course focuses on functional familiarity with the evaluation of quantitative research reports, research design, methods of data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation of data, and the reporting of research findings. The second portion of the course emphasizes a continuation of instruction on quantitative research and statistical analyses specific to work in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. The course culminates in the complete process of constructing a quantitative research study.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 820 Interdisciplinary Ldsh Theory (3 credits)

This course provides an interdisciplinary space for discussing the concept of leadership and its practical application in organizations. This course is therefore grounded in the “scholar-practitioner” model, whereby theory is applied in practice within a cycle of reflection and action. The purpose of this course is to establish a historical, theoretical, and practical basis for understanding leaders and leadership and will strive to provide various disciplinary lenses to help leaders better understand themselves and their organizations.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 830 Critical Ldsh: Social Justice (3 credits)

This course explores how historical relations of power have shaped current leadership practices in institutions such as schools, universities, health organizations, or non-profits. By engaging students in critical conversations on how social constructions of race, class, ethnicity, and gender have articulated notions of leadership that have further marginalized already disempowered groups, the course will pay particular attention to issues of knowledge, representation and identity. Ultimately, the course offers new analytical tools to create new spaces of possibilities in leadership grounded on the notions of justice, solidarity and allyship.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 835 Qualitative Research I (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of qualitative research approaches, including an examination of foundational research paradigms and a variety of qualitative research methods and techniques. Students will gain a functional familiarity with the evaluation of qualitative research reports, research design, data collection methods, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of research findings.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 840 Mixed Methods Research (3 credits)

This research method course continues the development of students’ understanding of educational research methodology and techniques. The central focus of the course is the opportunity for students to design, implement, and assess mixed methods research within an authentic educational context. Students will develop relevant research skills, including project management, analytical skills, research communication, and writing skills.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 845 Historical, Political, & Legal Contexts of Leadership: K-12 (3 credits)

This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to key historical events and documents shaping American society and education, specifically by overviewing how policy development, laws, and court decisions shape education. The course will highlight tensions around power, particularly between majority and non-majority perspectives on past, current, and present issues facing K-12 education.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 846 Hist/Pol/LegalContxt Ldsh: HE (3 credits)

This course overviews key historical, political, and legal elements that shaped and continue to shape institutions of higher education. The course will highlight tensions around power, particularly between majority and non-majority perspectives on past, current, and present issues facing higher education. Options available for students interested in social sector careers include applicable topics for papers, projects, and readings.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 850 Learning Design&Env: K-12 (3 credits)

This course examines elements of design that shape the learning and working experiences of individuals in schools. Through an overview of learning theories (e.g., pedagogical design, student and adult learning theories, communities of learners), architectural, space, and facilities theories, and legal/policy regulations, this course facilitates the practical application of creatively and effectively designing, creating, and managing learning environments for the growth of all schools and all learners. Across this course’s content, students will study how physical, organizational, and socially constructed environments shape student, adult, and organizational learning.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 851 Learning Design&Env: HE (3 credits)

This course examines elements of design that shape the learning and working experiences of individuals in institutions of higher education and social sector organizations. Through an overview of learning theories (e.g., pedagogical design, student and adult learning theories, sense of community) and architectural, space, and facilities design theory, this course facilitates the practical application of creatively and effectively designing, creating, utilizing, operating, and renovating learning environments and educational facilities. Across this course’s content, students will study how physical, organizational, and socially constructed environments shape student and adult learning and their sense of community.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 855 Scholar-Practitioner Sem: K-12 (3 credits)

The course has a twofold purpose: First, students will engage in culminating assessments that demonstrate their knowledge and practical application of program objectives, content, and skills. Second, students will engage in sessions around effective leadership practices, diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives, career advancement, and other special topics.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 856 Scholar-Practi Sem:Higher Ed (3 credits)

This course has a twofold purpose: First, students will engage in culminating assessments that demonstrate their knowledge and practical application of program objectives, content, and skills. Second, students will engage in sessions around effective leadership practices, diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives, career advancement, and other special topics.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 860 Strat Plan,Eval,Fiscal Resour (3 credits)

This course examines the foundations of educational planning and assessment in a project-oriented course with an emphasis on assessing needs, identifying environmental changes, establishing goals, drafting strategic plans, setting metrics to measure success, identifying resources (i.e., human capital, financial, others), and implementing strategic plans. In addition to strategic planning, this course analyzes the role of assessment and evaluation in terms of institutional effectiveness, achievement of plan goals, and government compliance requirements, as well as funding strategies and fiscal resource allocation. An overarching goal is to explore the role of internal, external, cultural, social, political, and cultural factors in education planning and assessment. This course maintains modules in which students are divided for a portion of the course by area of concentration (e.g., K-12, Higher Education, Other Social Sector Areas).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 865 Comm & Research Dissemination (3 credits)

This course studies effective written and verbal communication for professional settings, as well as the dissemination of research findings to scholarly, practitioner, policymaker, and general audiences. A key focus of the course is to enhance students’ writing and presentation style through various individual and group methods.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 870 Proposal Writing: K-12 (3 credits)

In this course, students will structure and present their dissertation topic by developing complete drafts of Chapters One (Introduction) and Two (Literature Review). Students will learn how to articulate and align their research question, statement of the problem, operational definitions and relevant scholarly works in a professional manner using APA and IDEPEL guidelines. Students will select and secure a dissertation chair by the end of this course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 871 Proposal Writing: Higher Educa (3 credits)

In this course, students will structure and present their dissertation topic by developing complete drafts of Chapters One (Introduction) and Two (Literature Review). Students will learn how to articulate and align their research question, statement of the problem, operational definitions and relevant scholarly works in a professional manner using APA and IDEPEL guidelines. Students will select and secure a dissertation chair by the end of this course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 875 Organizational Theory&Change (3 credits)

This course examines the theoretical foundations of organizations and organizational change, including such topics as structures and power in organizations, organizational culture, approaches to decision-making, the change process, motivation theory, conflict management, effective communication, and ethical leadership.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 880 Community Engaged Leadership (3 credits)

This course serves as a practical opportunity for students to apply the content knowledge from their doctoral coursework to a community-based problem for a regional organization. Combining a practicum format with a social justice orientation, students will work collaboratively with community partners to identify a problem and develop a project for addressing the problem.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 882 Independent Study: Leadership (3 credits)

This course provides individualized instruction and support around a topic of interest or specialized project under the close supervision of a faculty member.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 884 Independent Study: Research (3 credits)

This course provides individualized instruction and support around a topic of interest or specialized project under the close supervision of a faculty member.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 885 Global Perspectives on Ldsh (3 credits)

This course applies theories of leadership and organizational development to the practice of leading schools, higher education institutions, and organizations. Through experiential learning, simulations, and career counseling strategies, students engage with topics such as self-identity and self-care as a leader, group and power dynamics, inclusive cultures, and career advancement.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 886 Special Topics (1-3 credits)

This course examines a special topic in leadership under the close supervision of a faculty member.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 888 Curricular Practical Training (1 credit)

This course examines a special topic in leadership under the close supervision of a faculty member.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 890 Adv Resrch Method: Quant/Mixed (3 credits)

This advanced research methodology course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to design, conduct and report advanced quantitative and or mixed methods research studies related to topics in education and leadership. The expected outcome of this course is the development of a viable Chapter 3 of a dissertation proposal and obtaining a dissertation committee (i.e., content expert, methodologist).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 891 Adv Resrch Method: Qualitative (3 credits)

This advanced research method course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to design, conduct, and report advanced qualitative research studies in education and leadership. The expected outcome of this course is the development of a viable Chapter 3 (Methodology) and obtaining a dissertation committee (i.e., content expert, methodologist).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 893 Dissertation Study I (6 credits)

This course provides individualized support from dissertation committee members as students’ prepare and defend their dissertation proposal, apply for Institutional Review Board approval, collect data, analyze and write findings and discussions, defend their dissertation, and finalize post-defense steps.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 894 Dissertation Study II (6 credits)

This course provides individualized support from dissertation committee members as students’ prepare and defend their dissertation proposal, apply for Institutional Review Board approval, collect data, analyze and write findings and discussions, defend their dissertation, and finalize post-defense steps.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDL 899 Dissertation Study III (0 credits)

This course provides individualized support from dissertation committee members as students prepare and defend their dissertation proposal, apply for Institutional Review Board approval, collect data, analyze and write findings and discussions, defend their dissertation, and finalize post-defense steps. This course includes a charge of 1.00 billable credit.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral level students.

Attributes: Doctoral

EDU 121 Child Development (3 credits)

This course examines the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the child from birth through the childhood years (0-12), including the study of how children learn and acquire knowledge. Special attention will be given to leading theories of development and their implications in the early childhood and elementary classrooms as well as critiques of these theories.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 140 Publ Schls & Soc Eq in Urb Env (3 credits)

This course explores the controversies that the current education reform has created in urban school districts such as the School District of Philadelphia. Particular attention is given to the debate over school funding and the role that charter schools play in this debate. To understand the complexity of this issue, the course will introduce students to some of the main changes experienced by the School District of Philadelphia in recent times and will address how charter schools came to be regarded as “the” solution for public education in this City. Because this course also aims at providing students with an introduction to the process of research and to familiarize them with the conventions of different ways of writing, students will be required to conduct library- based research and to present their conclusions in different academic formats.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to PLS/HDC level students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 150 Schools in Society w/ Field (3 credits)

This course critically examines the system of American education and its function in American society in both historical and contemporary contexts. Drawing on multiple perspectives, including historical, sociological, economic and multicultural, this course provides conceptual frameworks by which to address fundamental questions regarding education for what purpose and in whose interest. It is in addressing these questions that we come to examine our own positions and the ways in which they influence our role as educators.

Attributes: Diversity Course, First-Year Seminar, Undergraduate

EDU 151 Cognition & Learning w/ Field (3 credits)

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply theories of human development to teaching practices. Special attention is directed towards intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, social dynamics in the classroom, tests and measurements, and various instruction models. Enrollment in Field Experience is required with this course.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr or Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr.

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

EDU 155 Found of Early Child w/ Field (3 credits)

This course provides students with a general overview of Early Childhood Education. This overview includes an introduction to the field of early childhood education, an examination of its core competencies, and analysis of developmentally appropriate practices for young children. Students will spend time observing in early childhood programs and will become familiar with key organizations, as well as relevant laws and regulations.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Art Education, Childhood Studies, Education, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr, Foreign Lang Educ PK-12, French - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education or Spanish - Secondary Education.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 157 Adolescent Development w/Field (3 credits)

The course addresses the dynamic complexities of adolescent development, through discussion of classic and emerging theories. The text readings and class assignments make use of research-based, real-world, and cross- cultural examples. The primary aim of the course is to foster the students ability to recognize and apply the connections among developmental domains and of theory and research with application as applied to the ever changing field of human development. The course takes a longer age range approach to adolescence by expanding coverage into the early twenties and giving attention to changes and continuities in development that take place during this period of "emerging adulthood."

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Art Education, Biology - Secondary Education, Chemistry -Secondary Education, Childhood Studies, Educational Studies, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, English - Secondary Education, French - Secondary Education, History - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education, Mathematics - Secondary Educat or Spanish - Secondary Education.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 160 Schools in Society w/ Field (3 credits)

See description for EDU 150. Appropriate for students who did not take EDU 150 in their freshman year.

Attributes: Diversity Course, Undergraduate

EDU 170 Special Topics in Education (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 231 Assessment and Evaluation (3 credits)

This course is designed so that pre-service teachers will understand and use multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making (from INTASC). It assumes that teaching is necessarily an ethical undertaking and that assessment, as an essential element in teaching, is not merely technical but enlaced with ethical issues at its core. Teacher candidates will learn basic assessment and evaluation concepts; examine instruments that reflect constructs of interest (cognitive, affective, and behavioral objectives); develop skill in aligning assessment and instruction to state standards; construct various types of assessments; and analyze and refine teacher-made instruments. Teacher candidates will also learn how to interpret test results and how to communicate and use them in educational decision-making. Throughout the course, they will learn the importance of critical issues in the field, including historical and theoretical perspectives on assessment issues; explore differentiation issues in assessment; and analyze and reflect upon the moral implications of assessment practices and policies.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive, Undergraduate

EDU 232 Literacy/Literature I w/ Field (3 credits)

This course provides students with the opportunity to investigate the various theoretical models of the reading process. Students investigate the various factors which impact upon successful reading performance. Students begin to investigate the use of literature, specifically fiction, nonfiction, poetry, picture books, and fantasy selections in the development of instructional practices in the primary grades. Included in this course is an investigation of the use of Basals as literature. In addition, students study the use of reading strategies to be used for teaching reading in the content areas.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 240 Literacy/Literature II w/Field (3 credits)

The course provides students with the opportunity to continue their investigation of the use of literature as central to the development of successful reading. Students are involved in extensive analysis of a wide range of literature for young people. Students continue to investigate the use of instructional reading models to critique strategies related to the use fiction, nonfiction, poetry, picture books, and fantasy selections . Included in this course is an investigation of multicultural literature and the writing process.

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 241 Soc/Emo Dev/Lrn: Erly Chld (3 credits)

This course focuses on the domain of social and emotional development in early childhood, and it explores the complex ways in which this domain of development changes over time from birth to allow the growing child to react and interact with others around them. An interactional model will serve as the primary theoretical framework that underlies all discussions and assignments in order to allow students to understand the concept that each major area of development in early childhood are interdependent on one another and directly contribute to the adaptability and resilience of the whole child. Students will become familiar with current theories on how the young child develops socially and emotionally from birth and how mastery of development in these areas provides lays the foundation for cognitive, linguistic, and motoric growth in the early years. Special topics include early childhood mental health, parent-child attachment, floor time and early exploration (play), family systems dynamics, resiliency, adversity/risk, policy reform, and promotion/prevention/intervention.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 242 Tech Enhan Curr & Inst w/Field (3 credits)

This is an introductory course designed to develop candidates’ technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and offer an overview of the role of technology, especially web-based tools, in instruction and learning. The course will focus on the application of computers and technology in the learning process and connecting these applications with relevant ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) and PDE standards. The impact of new technology on individuals, society, and educational agencies also will be investigated.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr or Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 246 Language and Culture w/ Field (3 credits)

This course introduces candidates to key theories, critical issues, and research-based practices related to promoting the language and literacy development of culturally and linguistically diverse students (PK-12), with a special focus on English language learners (ELLs). Candidates will learn how to use the Standards for English Language Development and PA academic standards to plan instruction in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Assigned readings, class discussions, video recordings, library and online research, and a field experience in a culturally and linguistically diverse classroom and school will engage candidates in the course topic.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Art Education, Biology - Secondary Education, Chemistry -Secondary Education, Childhood Studies, Educational Studies, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr, English - Secondary Education, French - Secondary Education, History - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education, Mathematics - Secondary Educat or Spanish - Secondary Education.

Attributes: Diversity Course, Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 247 Literacy in Cont Areas w/Field (3 credits)

The focus of this course is the teaching of content area reading and literacy across the curriculum for secondary schools. Topics to be examined include: theory, policy, practice and research in reading in the content area, reading across content areas, disciplinary reading, levels of reading and comprehension, place of reading in school programs, selecting diverse and appropriate curricular materials for enhancing reading that is culturally and linguistically responsive, differentiated reading instruction for diverse learners, general and specific strategies and study skills for content area reading comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and spelling, critical reading of texts including critical media literacy, adjustment of reading instruction to meet individual learning levels and styles in inclusive classrooms, diagnostic, screening, formative, summative and benchmark reading assessment, and interventions for improving reading comprehension in the content areas for challenged and culturally and linguistically diverse readers. This course includes field experience in 7-12 classrooms.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Art Education, Biology - Secondary Education, Chemistry -Secondary Education, Childhood Studies, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, English - Secondary Education, French - Secondary Education, History - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education, Mathematics - Secondary Educat or Spanish - Secondary Education.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 270 Special Topics in Education (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 345 Trauma in Infan & Early Child (3 credits)

The following course provides students with an in-depth study of trauma in infancy and early childhood, including analyses of historical origins, theoretical perspectives, influences on development and learning, and impacts on establishing sustained relationships throughout the lifespan. Throughout course readings and assignments, students will analyze specific levels and intensities of traumatic events and identify how these relate to the continuum of effects that early (chronic) trauma has on young children's internal working models of self-esteem, self-worth, self-competence, and overall self-identity. Various models of intervention and therapeutic approaches will be explored to provide students with pathways to: support children's development and learning, integrate educational and emotional wellness strategies to strengthen resilience, and help children cope with their exposure to trauma. The following course is especially appropriate for pre-professional students in the fields of educator preparation, child studies, psychology, or sociology.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 362 Soc Stud Thru Arts PK4 w/Field (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to connect theory and practice in the teaching of elementary school social studies through the visual and performing arts. Strategies for planning, implementing, and evaluating social studies instruction are designed with a focus on preparing children to be critical thinkers and young citizens in a global, technological and culturally diverse world.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 363 Science Methods PK-4 w/ Field (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to investigate content and pedagogy relevant to science instruction in PreK-4 classrooms. Emphasis is placed upon the philosophy, curriculum planning and organization, skill development, instructional methods, and classroom resources for the natural sciences.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 365 Math & Technology PK4 w/Field (3 credits)

Ultimately, the goal of this course is to prepare teachers or teaching candidates who have the knowledge, skills, and orientation to help young children develop their mathematical foundation. The concept of Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Mathematics provides the theoretical framework for the course structure and orientation. This means that students who successfully complete the course will have a thorough knowledge of the mathematics central to PK-4; an understanding of how children at these stages learn mathematics; and the ability to coordinate content and “best” practices for mathematics instruction, including the integration of technology. As a course in elementary level math teaching methods, it is designed to engage candidates in thinking beyond the facts and tools of mathematics to the level of understanding ideas and concepts. Thinking conceptually about mathematics means thinking in terms of mathematical constructs that have the potential to produce understanding. In addition, the course will address the role that technology tools are playing in children’s mathematics education. The specific mathematical content and instructional practices reflect the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the PA Department of Education standards, and the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M). Throughout the course, candidates will plan, implement, and reflect on lessons; use standards and assessments (formative and summative) in evaluating student progress and teacher effectiveness; apply standards-based assessment data to selection of appropriate instructional materials, technology, and/or recommendation for intervention; and apply standards based, data-driven, decision making procedures to lesson planning or re-teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 370 Special Topics in Education (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 400 Literacy Theories and Models (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with knowledge of the theories and models for understanding literacy acquisition and development. Emphasis will be placed upon various interactive models of the reading process, the psychology of literacy, and their implications for classroom instruction. The role of language, cognition, information processing, affective factors and measurement in reading will be examined to provide a broad understanding literacy acquisition and development.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 401 Literacy Assessment/Instruct (3 credits)

This course provides teacher candidates an in-depth study of students’ literacy instruction and assessment in grades K-3. A range of formal and informal assessments will be used to measure children’s early language and literacy development, including phonemic awareness, concepts of print, word recognition strategies, and comprehension abilities. This information will be used to make informed decisions about literacy instruction.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 410 Instr Techniq English w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces teacher candidates to key theories, philosophies, core concepts, issues, skills, methods of inquiry, application of technology and research-based practices related to teaching ELA at the secondary level. The course has a special focus on pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching ELA and promoting social justice in the ELA classroom. Candidates will learn how to align the PA ELA Content and Proficiency Standards and Assessment for instruction in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Students will draw upon a variety of tools to design, implement, reflect upon and evaluate ELA curriculum for secondary classrooms that is culturally and linguistically responsive to classroom diversity. Candidates will design and implement innovative techniques including new media literacies that address the academic needs of diverse learners. Assigned readings, class lectures and discussions, video and print resources, library and online research, written assignments and presentations, guest speakers, and field trips aim at developing candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching ELA. This course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Art Education, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, English - Secondary Education, Foreign Lang Educ PK-12, French - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education or Spanish - Secondary Education.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 412 Instr Techniq Soc St w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces teacher candidates to key theories, philosophies, core concepts, issues, skills, methods of inquiry, application of technology and research-based practices related to promoting social studies literacy development of secondary students. The course has a special focus on pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching social studies and promoting social justice in the social studies classroom. Candidates will learn how to align the PA Social Studies Proficiency Standards with the PA academic standards to plan instruction in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Students will draw upon a variety of tools to design, implement, reflect upon and evaluate social studies curriculum for secondary classrooms. Teacher candidates will engage in designing and implementing innovative techniques, new literacies, and effective teaching techniques that address the academic needs of culturally diverse learners. Assigned readings, class lectures and discussions, video and print resources, library and online research, written assignments and presentations, guest speakers, and field trips aim at developing teacher candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching social studies.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr or History - Secondary Education. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 414 Instr Techniq Flang w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces the teacher candidate to key theories, philosophies, core concepts, issues, skills, methods of inquiry, application of technology and research-based practices related to the substance and strategies of proficiency oriented second language instruction (K-12). The course has a special focus on pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching foreign languages and promoting social justice in the FL classroom. Candidates will learn how to align the PA FL Content and Proficiency Standards and Assessment (ACTFL) in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Students will draw upon a variety of tools of design, implement, reflect upon, and evaluate FL curriculum for secondary classrooms. In order to develop each candidate’s knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching FLs, candidates will design and implement innovative techniques including new media literacies that address the academic needs of diverse learners. Upon completion of this course, you should be able to: Identify current instructional practices, theories, and paradigms in a Foreign Language Classroom; Demonstrate current instructional practices and theories in a Foreign Language Classroom; Construct Lesson Plans to be implemented in a Foreign Language Classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, Foreign Lang Educ PK-12, French - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education or Spanish - Secondary Education. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 416 Instr Techniq Math w/Field (3 credits)

This course is intended to assist students in the development of their individual approaches to instructional styles and strategies. Students will be placed in a secondary classroom where they will study issues related to teaching pedagogy. Emphasis will be placed upon the current research and the development of techniques useful in the presentation of mathematical concepts at the secondary level. Included in this course is a thorough investigation of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ Standards and examination of Gender Bias in the mathematics classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr or Mathematics - Secondary Educat. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 418 Instr Techniq Science w/Field (3 credits)

This course is intended to assist students in the development of their individual instructional styles and strategies. Well-conceived and effective curriculum and instruction are based upon both an understanding of the adolescent and the nature of science. Instructional techniques ranging from lecture and demonstrations to laboratory and computer simulations will be modeled and analyzed. Issues in classroom management and safety, among other topics, will be explored. Students will be placed in a secondary classroom where they will study issues related to teaching pedagogy. All of these courses in instructional methodology include discussion of and practice in instructional management, student motivation, the implications of learning theory for classrooms, the identification of instructional resources, and procedures for the measurement of student achievement. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in these skills for successful completion of the course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Biology - Secondary Education, Chemistry -Secondary Education or Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 422 Instruct Tech. for Art Edu (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce pre-service teachers of Art to instructional processes, teaching strategies, materials, lesson planning, assessment practices, and classroom management theory that will be of practical value in the classroom. Students will be placed in a K-12 art classroom where they will study issues related to teaching pedagogy.

Prerequisites: EDU 150 and EDU 151 and SPE 160

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Art Education. Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Field Experience, Undergraduate

EDU 430 Linguistics and ESL (3 credits)

This course is will introduce teacher candidates interested in ESL instruction to the study of language and principles of linguistics. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, pragmatics, second language acquisition, pedagogy, and applied linguistics in the learning English as a second language. This course is open to all undergraduate students interested in working with students for whom English is a second language.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 432 Theories & Models in Language (3 credits)

The course introduces teacher candidates interested in ESL to theories and models in language acquisition, processes of language acquisition, especially the process of learning a second or additional language. Emphasis will be given to learning environments, the characteristics of interaction and participation, and contexts that facilitate second language acquisition. The course will also explore linguistic factors and processes in second language acquisition (SLA) and examine how they are influenced by the learner’s home language. This course requires a 15-hour field experience.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 457 Sem ClinApp of Traum in Infanc (3 credits)

The following course provides students with an applied course, which focuses on specific trauma cases in infancy and early childhood. This course is designed as the capstone course for those students who have successfully completed two prior related courses. (i.e., EDU 241/644 & EDU 345/651). A roundtable format will be the primary format for all lectures, discussions, and assignments. Students will investigate specific trauma cases, and they will use prior knowledge and current empirical/best practice evidence to analyze and pose appropriate educational/interventional suggestions. This course is appropriate for students majoring in the following programs such as early care and educator preparation, Childhood Studies, Child Life, and other related allied health professions.

Prerequisites: EDU 241 and EDU 345

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 471 Writing in the Classroom (3 credits)

A practical course in the teaching of writing across the curriculum. Practice in personal, creative, and expository writing. Methods of teaching writing and steps in the writing process (pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, publishing) are emphasized in the course.

Attributes: Undergraduate, Writing Intensive Course- GEP

EDU 474 Special Topics in EDU (3 credits)

Rotating topics in Education.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 475 ESL Internship w/Field (4 credits)

This course introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of the ESL/Bilingual teacher through a school- based internship. Interns spend 30 hours in the company of expert ESL/Bilingual educators in school settings. Students will gain expertise in working with groups of students, interfacing with teachers and caregivers, and examining programs that serve emergent bilingual students in grades PK-12. Emphasis will be on program design and implementation guided by the English language development standards (ELDS), including assessing students’ language capacities, designing programs to fit a variety of language needs, working with teachers and other school professionals to serve emergent bilinguals, and organizing programs to enhance caregiver collaboration. The course requires students to fulfill a 30-hour field requirement working with ESL students.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 476 Pedagogy for ESL Learn w/Field (3 credits)

This course examines various approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching and assessing English Language Learners in bilingual and ESL classrooms, as well as for assisting ELL students’ learning in regular classrooms. This course is also suitable for those interested in teaching in an EFL environment (abroad). Candidates will develop a culturally responsive curriculum and design a variety of research-supported instructional activities to meet the needs of the culturally and linguistically diverse learners. The course requires students to fulfill a 30-hour field requirement for completing course assignments.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 479 Independent Study Education (3 credits)

This course is designed to accommodate those students who have an interest in a research- or internship- worthy topic that can be examined on an independent basis. The student will work closely with a professor on an education-related topic that will require the identification of that topic, a literature review, appropriate methodology/field experience, and analysis.

EDU 491 Secondary Student Teaching (12 credits)

Student teaching is a full-semester, full-time, full-day, 14-week student teaching experience of the teacher preparation program for SJU students seeking initial teacher certification. The Pennsylvania Department of Education (http://www.education.pa.gov/) defines student teaching as a set of organized and carefully planned classroom teaching experiences required of all candidates in a preparation program. Student teachers are assigned to one or more classrooms, closely supervised and apprenticed by a certified teacher who serves as the cooperating teacher, and provides regular feedback to the student on his or her classroom teaching performance. Student teachers are also assigned a university mentor who observes student teachers in their field placement and provides feedback on the six domains of student teacher competencies as outlined by PDE. In conjunction with student teaching placement in the school, all student teachers are required to attend a weekly seminar in student teaching conducted by a university professor. All student teachers are required to abide by PDE Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators. A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should complete the “Application for Student Teaching” (https://sites.sju.edu/education/student-teaching/application-student-intern-teaching/) at least one semester in advance of student teaching.

Prerequisites: EDU 150 and EDU 157 and SPE 160 and SPE 203

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Art Education, Biology - Secondary Education, Chemistry -Secondary Education, English - Secondary Education, French - Secondary Education, History - Secondary Education, Italian - Secondary Education, Latin - Secondary Education, Mathematics - Secondary Educat or Spanish - Secondary Education.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 495 ECE Student Teaching (12 credits)

This experience is designed as the capstone professional course for the PK-4 education major; it is to be the final course taken in the major sequence. The student teaching experience approximates a full-time teaching experience for the semester (14 weeks). In addition, the teacher candidate attends a seminar once each week in which issues related to student teaching are studied. This field-based seminar is designed to provide preservice teachers with an understanding of the diverse needs of their students and their learning environments in early childhood education (as defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Education) for grades pre-k – 4th. At the conclusion of the student teaching experience, the candidate shall have demonstrated proficiencies in instructional management; student motivation; curriculum planning; learning theory, problem solving in the educational setting; the use of technology; use of appropriate pedagogies across content areas, including reading, language, and literacy skills in all classrooms; the identification of appropriate instructional resources; and the assessment of student achievement. Throughout student teaching and the student teaching seminar, candidates will be expected to apply the knowledge, skills, and competencies developed through the Saint Joseph's University Teacher Preparation Program as aligned with the program’s mission to “to cultivate knowledgeable, caring, reflective, and socially conscientious educators who can think critically, inspire a passion for learning, communicate effectively, and advocate intentionally for all PK-12 candidates, including those from culturally nondominant communities and those who have distinct learning needs.” A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should complete the “Application for Student Teaching” (https://sites.sju.edu/education/student-teaching/application-student-intern-teaching/) at least one semester in advance of student teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 496 Student Teaching (4-8) (12 credits)

Student teaching is a full-semester, full-time, full-day, 14-week student teaching experience of the teacher preparation program for SJU students seeking initial teacher certification. The Pennsylvania Department of Education (http://www.education.pa.gov/) defines student teaching as a set of organized and carefully planned classroom teaching experiences required of all candidates in a preparation program. Student teachers are assigned to one or more classrooms, closely supervised and apprenticed by a certified teacher who serves as the cooperating teacher, and provides regular feedback to the student on his or her classroom teaching performance. Student teachers are also assigned a university mentor who observes student teachers in their field placement and provides feedback on the six domains of student teacher competencies as outlined by PDE. In conjunction with student teaching placement in the school, all student teachers are required to attend a weekly seminar in student teaching conducted by a university professor. All student teachers are required to abide by PDE Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators. A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should complete the “Application for Student Teaching” (https://sites.sju.edu/education/student-teaching/application-student-intern-teaching/) at least one semester in advance of student teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr.

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 498 Dual Major Student Teaching (6 credits)

This experience is designed as the capstone professional course for the Double Major (PK-4 / Special Education); it should be taken in conjunction with SPE 495. It is to be the final course taken in the major sequence. The Student Teaching experience approximates a full-time working experience for the semester (fourteen weeks) and includes experiences in both regular and special education classrooms. It includes a seminar class each week in which issues related to student teaching are studied. At the conclusion of the Student Teaching experience, the student shall have demonstrated proficiencies in instructional management, student motivation, curriculum planning, learning theory, solving problems in the education setting, using reading, language and literacy skills in working with exceptional students, identifying instructional resources, using technology, and assessing student achievement. A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should apply to the Office of Student Teaching according to the application deadlines established by the Department. These deadlines are more than one semester in advance of student teaching. See Education Department home page for on-line application and guidelines.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr, Special Education (7 to 12) or Special Education (PK to 8).

Attributes: Undergraduate

EDU 550 His & Contemp Persp Ed w/Field (3 credits)

American education as a dynamic, sometimes cyclic, process. The origins, evolution, and realities of contemporary public and private schools are examined through critical reading original documents. Visits to elementary or secondary classrooms in multicultural setting provide a strong link to the teacher’s world.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 551 Psych Teach Dev Persp w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces theoretical models of instructional design, student motivation, classroom management, and assessment. Attention is directed to instructional objectives; to lesson formats; to motivational strategies; to classroom discipline; to teacher attitudes and expectations; and tests and measurements. Particular attention is given to recent developments in schema theory and to constructivist models.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 557 Adolescent Psychology w/ Field (3 credits)

This course introduces theoretical models of instructional design, student motivation, classroom management, and assessment at the secondary level. Attention is directed to instructional objectives; to lesson formats; to motivational strategies; to classroom discipline; to teacher attitudes and expectations; and tests and measurements. Particular attention is given to recent developments in schema theory and to constructivist models.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 570 Education Independent Study (3 credits)

EDU 600 Educ Lead Research&Refl Pract (3 credits)

EDU 610 Instr Techniq English w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces graduate level teacher candidates to key theories, philosophies, core concepts, issues, skills, methods of inquiry, application of technology and research-based practices related to teaching ELA at the secondary level. The course has a special focus on pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching ELA and promoting social justice in the ELA classroom. Candidates will learn how to align the PA ELA Content and Proficiency Standards and Assessment for instruction in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Students will draw upon a variety of tools to design, implement, reflect upon and evaluate ELA curriculum for secondary classrooms that is culturally and linguistically responsive to classroom diversity. Candidates will design and implement innovative techniques including new media literacies that address the academic needs of diverse learners. Assigned readings, class lectures and discussions, video and print resources, library and online research, written assignments and presentations, guest speakers, and field trips aim at developing candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching ELA. This course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 611 Instruct Techniques - Eng Lab (1 credit)

EDU 612 Instr Techniq Soc St w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces graduate level teacher candidates to key theories, philosophies, core concepts, issues, skills, methods of inquiry, application of technology and research-based practices related to promoting social studies literacy development of secondary students. The course has a special focus on pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching social studies and promoting social justice in the social studies classroom. Candidates will learn how to align the PA Social Studies Proficiency Standards with the PA academic standards to plan instruction in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Students will draw upon a variety of tools to design, implement, reflect upon and evaluate social studies curriculum for secondary classrooms. Teacher candidates will engage in designing and implementing innovative techniques, new literacies, and effective teaching techniques that address the academic needs of culturally diverse learners. Assigned readings, class lectures and discussions, video and print resources, library and online research, written assignments and presentations, guest speakers, and field trips aim at developing teacher candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching social studies. The course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 614 Instr Techniq Flan w/Field (3 credits)

This course introduces the teacher candidate to key theories, philosophies, core concepts, issues, skills, methods of inquiry, application of technology and research-based practices related to the substance and strategies of proficiency oriented second language instruction (K-12). The course has a special focus on pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching foreign languages and promoting social justice in the FL classroom. Candidates will learn how to align the PA FL Content and Proficiency Standards and Assessment (ACTFL) in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Students will draw upon a variety of tools of design, implement, reflect upon, and evaluate FL curriculum for secondary classrooms. In order to develop each candidate’s knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching FLs, candidates will design and implement innovative techniques including new media literacies that address the academic needs of diverse learners. Upon completion of this course, you should be able to identify current instructional practices, theories, and paradigms in a Foreign Language Classroom and demonstrate current instructional practices and theories in a Foreign Language Classroom. The course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 615 Instruct Tech - For Lang Lab (1 credit)

EDU 616 Instr Techniq Math w/Field (3 credits)

Intensive study and practice of teaching modalities and classroom management strategies appropriate for a secondary classroom. The study of curriculum resources in the student’s area of certification is included. Topics in the course include instructional management, student motivation, the implications of learning theory for classrooms, and the procedures for the measurement of student achievement. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in these skills for successful completion of the course. The course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 618 Instr Techniq Science w/Field (3 credits)

Intensive study and practice of teaching modalities and classroom management strategies appropriate for a secondary classroom. The study of curriculum resources in the student’s area of certification is included. Topics in the course include instructional management, student motivation, the implications of learning theory for classrooms, and the procedures for the measurement of student achievement. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in these skills for successful completion of the course. The course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 621 Instruct Techniq: Comp Sci Edu (3 credits)

Candidates will learn subject-specific standards for competencies based upon the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) standards. The CSTA academic standards detail a core set of learning objectives providing the foundation for a rigorous K-12 computer science curriculum. The standards introduce the foundational concepts of computer science making them accessible for all learners. Topics will include the following: Algorithms and Programming, Computing Systems, Data and Analysis, Impacts of Computing, Networks and the Internet and Pedagogy.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 622 Instr Tech Art Ed w/Field (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce pre-service teachers of Art to instructional processes, teaching strategies, materials, lesson planning, assessment practices, and classroom management theory that will be of practical value in the classroom. The course has a mandatory field experience in a 7-12 grade classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 625 Theory & Pr Sec Teach w/Field (3 credits)

This course studies the content and methods for teaching the five PA certification disciplines: English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science, and Citizenship. National, state, and local standards are examined, which students consider in relation to curriculum design and pedagogy. Backward Design, a method for developing lessons and units, provides a common organizing framework that fosters good teaching. For part of the course, students study within their own discipline, interacting with texts that discuss curriculum frameworks, the planning of lessons and units, pedagogical content knowledge, and assessment. Ten models of teaching that are applicable to all disciplines are explored in detail. As students develop units of study, they gain practice in using these models and the Backward Design method.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 627 Theory & Pr Sec Mat/Sc w/Field (3 credits)

This course studies the content and methods for teaching the PA certification disciplines: Mathematics, Science. National, state, and local standards are examined, which students consider in relation to curriculum design and pedagogy. Backward Design, a method for developing lessons and units, provides a common organizing framework that fosters good teaching. For part of the course, students study within their own discipline, interacting with texts that discuss curriculum frameworks, the planning of lessons and units, pedagogical content knowledge, and assessment. Ten models of teaching that are applicable to all disciplines are explored in detail. As students develop units of study, they gain practice in using these models and the Backward Design method.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 631 Assessment & Evaluation (3 credits)

This course is designed so teacher candidates understand and use multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making (from INTASC). Teacher candidates will learn basic assessment and evaluation concepts; examine instruments that reflect constructs of interest (cognitive, affective, and behavioral objectives); develop skill in aligning assessment and instruction to state standards; construct various types of assessments; and analyze and refine teacher-made instruments. Teacher candidates will also learn how to interpret test results and how to communicate and use them in educational decision-making. Throughout the course, they will learn the importance of critical issues in the field, assessment as an ethical practice, historical and theoretical perspectives on assessment issues; differentiation issues in assessment; and will be able to analyze and reflect upon the ethical implications of assessment practices and policies.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 632 Literacy/Literature I w/ Field (3 credits)

This course provides students with the opportunity to investigate the various theoretical models of the reading process. Students investigate the various factors which impact upon successful reading performance. Students begin to investigate the use of literature, specifically fiction, nonfiction, poetry, picture books, and fantasy selections in the development of instructional practices in the primary grades. Included in this course is an investigation of the use of Basals as literature. In addition, students study the use of reading strategies to be used for teaching reading in the content areas.

Prerequisites: EDU 4035 Placement Score with a score of 1 or EDU 551

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 640 Literacy/Literature II w/Field (3 credits)

The course provides students with the opportunity to continue their investigation of the use of literature as central to the development of successful reading. Students are involved in extensive analysis of a wide range of literature for young people. Students continue to investigate the use of instructional reading models to critique strategies related to the use fiction, nonfiction, poetry, picture books, and fantasy selections. Included in this course is an investigation of Multicultural Literature and the Writing Process.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 642 Per in Dev & Child Ed w/Field (3 credits)

This course is designed as an introduction to developmental perspectives in early childhood education (ECE). Topics to be covered include: recognizing the unique roles of early care and education providers; understanding cognitive, social-emotional, adaptive and motor development in childhood; assessing and planning using developmentally appropriate and standards-based curricula; understanding instructional design, student motivation, and classroom management; providing inclusive learning environments; and communicating effectively with families and caregivers. Special attention will be given to contemporary models of ECE in school and other early childhood settings, including constructivist models, as well as the unique needs of early learners, including English Language Learners and students with special needs.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 643 FE: Reading Literature II (1 credit)

EDU 644 Socio-Emotion & Motor Develop (3 credits)

EDU 645 Trauma:Infancy & Early Child (3 credits)

The following course provides students with an in-depth study of trauma in infancy and early childhood, including analyses of historical origins, theoretical perspectives, influences on development and learning, and impacts on establishing sustained relationships throughout the lifespan. Throughout course readings and assignments, students will analyze specific levels and intensities of traumatic events and identify how these relate to the continuum of effects that early (chronic) trauma has on young children's internal working models of self-esteem, self-worth, self-competence, and overall self-identity. Various models of intervention and therapeutic approaches will be explored to provide students with pathways to: support children's development and learning, integrate educational and emotional wellness strategies to strengthen resilience, and help children cope with their exposure to trauma. The following course is especially appropriate for pre-professional students in the fields of educator preparation, child studies, psychology, or sociology.

EDU 646 Language and Culture w/ Field (3 credits)

This course introduces candidates to key theories, issues, and research-based practices related to serving culturally and linguistically diverse students (Pre-K-12), with a special focus on students who are commonly referred to as English language learners (ELLs). Candidates will explore the many dimensions of culture and language. They will also learn how to align the PA Language Proficiency Standards with the PA academic standards to plan instruction in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting. Assigned readings, class discussions, video recordings, library and online research, and a field experience in a culturally and linguistically diverse classroom will engage candidates in the course topics.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 647 Literacy & Lrn Acr Cur w/Field (3 credits)

The focus of this course is the teaching of content area reading and literacy across the curriculum for secondary schools. Topics to be examined include: theory, policy, practice and research in reading in the content area, reading across content areas, disciplinary reading, levels of reading and comprehension, place of reading in school programs, selecting diverse and appropriate curricular materials for enhancing reading that is culturally and linguistically responsive, differentiated reading instruction for diverse learners, general and specific strategies and study skills for content area reading comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and spelling, critical reading of texts including critical media literacy, adjustment of reading instruction to meet individual learning levels and styles in inclusive classrooms, diagnostic, screening, formative, summative and benchmark reading assessment, and interventions for improving reading comprehension in the content areas for challenged and culturally and linguistically diverse readers. This course includes field experience in 7-12 classrooms.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 657 Clin App of Trauma in Infancy (3 credits)

The following course provides students with an applied course, which focuses on specific trauma cases in infancy and early childhood. This course is designed as the capstone course for those students who have successfully completed two prior related courses (i.e., EDU 241/644 & EDU 345/651). A roundtable format will be the primary format for all lectures, discussions, and assignments. Students will investigate specific trauma cases, and they will use prior knowledge and current empirical/best practice evidence to analyze and pose appropriate educational/interventional suggestions. This course is appropriate for students majoring in the following programs such as early care and educator preparation, Childhood Studies, Child Life, and other related allied health professions.

Prerequisites: EDU 641 and EDU 645

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 660 Science Methods ECE (3 credits)

EDU 661 Math & Technology ECE (3 credits)

EDU 662 Science & Math Methods 4-8 (3 credits)

EDU 663 Science Methods PK-4 w/ Field (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to investigate the philosophy, curriculum planning and organization, skill development, content knowledge, and instructional approaches relevant to teaching elementary school science.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 665 Interd Teach Mat/Tech w/Field (3 credits)

Ultimately, the goal of this course is to prepare teachers or teaching candidates who have the knowledge, skills, and orientation to help young children develop their mathematical foundation. The concept of Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Mathematics provides the theoretical framework for the course structure and orientation. This means that students who successfully complete the course will have a thorough knowledge of the mathematics central to pre-K – 4; an understanding of how children at these stages learn mathematics; and the ability to coordinate content and “best” practices for mathematics instruction, including the integration of technology. As a course in elementary level math teaching methods, it is designed to engage candidates in thinking beyond the facts and tools of mathematics to the level of understanding ideas and concepts. Thinking conceptually about mathematics means thinking in terms of mathematical constructs that have the potential to produce understanding. In addition, the course will address the role that technology tools are playing in children’s mathematics education. The specific mathematical content and instruction practices reflect the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the PA Department of Education standards, and the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M). Throughout the course, candidates will plan, implement, and reflect on lessons; use standards and assessments (formative and summative) in evaluating student progress and teacher effectiveness; apply standards based assessment data to selection of appropriate instructional materials, technology, and/or recommendation for intervention; and apply standards based, data-driven, decision making procedures to lesson planning or re-teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 667 Soc St Thru Arts Pk4 w/Field (3 credits)

EDU 667 Teach Soc Stud Thru Arts PK-4 (3 credits) The purpose of this course is to connect theory and practice in the teaching of elementary school social studies. Strategies for planning, implementing, and evaluating social studies instruction are designed with a focus on preparing children to be critical thinkers and young citizens in a global, technological and culturally diverse world.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 671 Writing in the Classroom (3 credits)

This course introduces theories and practices of writing instruction, with a specific emphasis on writing process pedagogy. Candidates will experiment with writing across genres, and will learn how to use mentor texts, develop mini-lessons, create workshop classrooms, and develop assessment tools. Candidates will be able to concentrate on specific student populations based on their certification.

EDU 674 Socio-Emotion Develop (3 credits)

This course focuses on the domain of social and emotional development in early childhood, and it explores the complex ways in which this domain of development changes over time from birth to allow the growing child to react and interact with others around them. An interactional model will serve as the primary theoretical framework that underlies all discussions and assignments in order to allow students to understand the concept that each major area of development in early childhood are interdependent on one another and directly contribute to the adaptability and resilience of the whole child. Students will become familiar with current theories on how the young child develops socially and emotionally from birth and how mastery of development in these areas provides lays the foundation for cognitive, linguistic, and motoric growth in the early years. Special topics include early childhood mental health, parent-child attachment, floor time and early exploration (play), family systems dynamics, resiliency, adversity/risk, policy reform, and promotion/prevention/intervention.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 691 Secondary Student Teaching (6 credits)

Student teaching is a full-semester, full-time, full-day, 14-week student teaching experience of the teacher preparation program for SJU students seeking initial teacher certification. The Pennsylvania Department of Education (http://www.education.pa.gov/) defines student teaching as a set of organized and carefully planned classroom teaching experiences required of all candidates in a preparation program. Student teachers are assigned to one or more classrooms, closely supervised and apprenticed by a certified teacher who serves as the cooperating teacher, and provides regular feedback to the student on his or her classroom teaching performance. Student teachers are also assigned a university mentor who observes student teachers in their field placement and provides feedback on the six domains of student teacher competencies as outlined by PDE. In conjunction with student teaching placement in the school, all student teachers are required to attend a weekly seminar in student teaching conducted by a university professor. All student teachers are required to abide by PDE Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators. A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should complete the “Application for Student Teaching” (https://sites.sju.edu/education/student-teaching/application-student-intern-teaching/) at least one semester in advance of student teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 692 Elem/Sped Student Teaching (6 credits)

EDU 695 PK-4 Student Teaching (6 credits)

This experience is designed as the capstone professional course for the PK-4 education program; it is to be the final course taken. The student teaching experience approximates a full-time teaching experience for the semester (14 weeks). In addition, the teacher candidate attends a seminar once each week in which issues related to student teaching are studied. This field-based seminar is designed to provide teacher candidates with an understanding of the diverse needs of their students and their learning environments in early childhood education (as defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Education) for grades pre-k – 4th. At the conclusion of the student teaching experience, the candidate shall have demonstrated proficiencies in instructional management; student motivation; curriculum planning; learning theory, problem solving in the educational setting; the use of technology; use of appropriate pedagogies across content areas, including reading, language, and literacy skills in all classrooms; the identification of appropriate instructional resources; and the assessment of student achievement. Throughout student teaching and the student teaching seminar, candidates will be expected to apply the knowledge, skills, and competencies developed through the Saint Joseph's University Teacher Preparation Program as aligned with the program’s mission to “to cultivate knowledgeable, caring, reflective, and socially conscientious educators who can think critically, inspire a passion for learning, communicate effectively, and advocate intentionally for all PK-12 candidates, including those from culturally nondominant communities and those who have distinct learning needs.” A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should complete the “Application for Student Teaching” (https://sites.sju.edu/education/student-teaching/application-student-intern-teaching/) at least one semester in advance of student teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 696 Student Teaching 4-8 (6 credits)

Student teaching is a full-semester, full-time, full-day, 14-week student teaching experience of the teacher preparation program for SJU students seeking initial teacher certification. The Pennsylvania Department of Education (http://www.education.pa.gov/) defines student teaching as a set of organized and carefully planned classroom teaching experiences required of all candidates in a preparation program. Student teachers are assigned to one or more classrooms, closely supervised and apprenticed by a certified teacher who serves as the cooperating teacher, and provides regular feedback to the student on his or her classroom teaching performance. Student teachers are also assigned a university mentor who observes student teachers in their field placement and provides feedback on the six domains of student teacher competencies as outlined by PDE. In conjunction with student teaching placement in the school, all student teachers are required to attend a weekly seminar in student teaching conducted by a university professor. All student teachers are required to abide by PDE Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators. A maximum of one additional course may be taken during the student teaching semester. Students should complete the “Application for Student Teaching” (https://sites.sju.edu/education/student-teaching/application-student-intern-teaching/) at least one semester in advance of student teaching.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 697 Secondary Student Teaching (6 credits)

EDU 700 Psychology of Literacy (3 credits)

Designed to provide educators with an understanding of the psychological basis of literacy acquisition and development. Emphasis will be placed upon interactive models of the reading process and their implications for classroom instruction. The role of language, cognition, information processing, affective factors and measurement in reading will be examined in detail.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 701 Assess & Instr in Liter K-3 (3 credits)

This course provides in-depth study of students’ literacy development in grades K-3. A range of formal and informal assessments will be used to examine children’s early language and literacy development, including phonemic awareness, concepts of print, word recognition strategies, and comprehension abilities. This information will be used to make informed decisions about literacy instruction.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 702 Assess & Instr in Liter 4-12 (3 credits)

This course provides in-depth study of student’s literacy development in grades 4-12. A range of formal and informal assessments will be used to examine children’s literacy abilities; a focus of the course is understanding and enhancing growth in areas of selecting and applying comprehension strategies and reading texts critically. Assessments will be used to make informed decisions about literacy instruction.

Prerequisites: EDU 701

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 703 Literacy Research (3 credits)

This course is designed to enable students to read and react critically to current research in the field of literacy. Emphasis will include an examination of the nature of educational research and the use and misuse of statistical analyses and interpretations of data. Students will complete a modified literature review of a specific topic to inform their own research agenda.

Prerequisites: EDU 701

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 704 Plng & Org a Literacy Program (3 credits)

The study of the reading program (K-12) is central to this course which utilizes the concept of communication as a unifying theme. Aspects of the planning and organizing of the literacy curriculum are examined. Emphasis is placed on the role of the reading specialist in developing, coordinating, and administering a literacy program. Students will assess the strengths and needs of a school’s literacy program and make recommendations for improvement. Prerequisites: three reading specialist courses.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 705 Literacy Practicum (6 credits)

During this practical experience, students work intensively with pupils who have reading difficulties in their school setting. Under the guidance of a supervisor, graduate students will conduct assessments and draw from these data to inform their instruction. Each student will be expected to develop a case study on at least one student during the practicum experience.

Prerequisites: EDU 700 and EDU 701 and EDU 702

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 706 Socio Cult Aspects of Literacy (3 credits)

This course is based on theoretical frameworks relating literacy learning to the various contexts which lead learners to socially and culturally different ways of making sense and being in the world. It examines multiple views of language, literacy, and literacy development. Students explore the factors that impact literacy learning across different cultural communities. They also explore issues of race, class, and culture on language and literacy acquisition and development.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 710 English Linguistics (3 credits)

This course aims to meet part of the requirement for PDE’s ESL Program Specialist certification and the course is an introduction to the study of language and principles of linguistics. The objective of this course is to explore the basic components of language mostly from an ESL teacher’s perspective and gain a better understanding of the challenges and strengths ESL students have in learning English as a new language. In particular, students will develop knowledge about the language sound system (phonetics and phonology), the form of words (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), word and sentence meaning (semantics) as well as pragmatics (contextual use of language). Students will also explore other topics and issues related to linguistics, such as how language is applied in social situations in different cultures (Sociolinguistics), how languages change over time (historical linguistics), and how languages are learned (language acquisition) and taught (pedagogy and applied linguistics).

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 712 Topics in Language Acquisition (3 credits)

The course examines the processes of second language acquisition (SLA) and the various factors that influence language learning and teaching from different perspectives. Topics to be explored include age and acquisition, human learning, individual differences, affective factors, learners’ cultural backgrounds, as well as social interactions and learning contexts that facilitate second language acquisition. Additionally, the course will also explore language transfer, interlanguage, and translanguaging. The course requires 15 hours of field to meet PDE’s field requirement.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 713 Method Teach English Sec Lang (3 credits)

This course examines various approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching and assessing English Language Learners in bilingual and ESL classrooms, as well as for assisting ELL students’ learning in regular classrooms. This course is also suitable for those interested in teaching in an EFL environment (abroad). Candidates will develop a culturally responsive curriculum and design a variety of research-supported instructional activities to meet the needs of the culturally and linguistically diverse learners. The course requires students to fulfill a 30-hour field requirement for completing course assignments.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 714 Intnshp ESL/Bilin Prog w/Field (4 credits)

This course introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of the ESL/Bilingual teacher through a school- based internship. Interns spend 30 hours in the company of expert ESL/Bilingual educators in school settings. Students will gain expertise in working with groups of students, interfacing with teachers and caregivers, and examining programs that serve emergent bilingual students in grades PK-12. Emphasis will be on program design and implementation guided by the English language development standards (ELDS), including assessing students’ language capacities, designing programs to fit a variety of language needs, working with teachers and other school professionals to serve emergent bilinguals, and organizing programs to enhance caregiver collaboration. The course has a 30 hour field experience.

Prerequisites: EDU 712 and EDU 713 and EDU 646

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 716 Cultural DiversityinClassrooms (3 credits)

This course is designed to promote the exploration of issues of cultural diversity in American Education in preparation for the changing needs of society. Specific emphasis will be placed upon the role of literature as a springboard for discussion an integration of diversity issues into the curriculum. Students will also investigate current research investigating diversity in schools.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

EDU 769 Advanced Fieldwork in Literacy (6 credits)

SPE 160 Intro to Special Education (3 credits)

This introductory course is designed to provide teachers- in-training with an understanding of the child with a disability in various instructional settings. Students will be provided with an overview of Special Education with emphasis on historical and emerging perspectives. Topics to be examined will include types and natures of exceptionalities; legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers; least restrictive environment; various instructional settings; the inclusion of exceptional children in regular education; services and programs for the exceptional child.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Educational Studies, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr, Secondary Education or Special Education.

Attributes: Ethics Intensive, Undergraduate

SPE 170 Special Topics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 205 Inclusive Classrooms w/ Field (3 credits)

The focus of this course is on the developing of skills for effective inclusive classroom management and creating classroom climates conducive to student achievement in PreK-12 classrooms. It provides coverage of a variety of discipline models to aid candidates in building systems and conceptual models of classroom management based on their underlying theories. This course emphasizes: (a) activities promoting positive behavioral supports, including school wide, classroom, and individual supports, (b) increasing student motivation and academic engagement through effective pedagogical practices, (c) establishing cooperative classroom routines, procedures, and practices, (d) organizing the environment, (e) effective instructional planning, and (f) measuring and reporting progress.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 270 Special Topics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 320 Progress Monitoring w/ Field (3 credits)

This course will provide an in-depth presentation of the complex issues of assessment at all levels of educational settings. The content of this course will provide students with an in-depth review of informal evaluation procedures and classroom-based data collection strategies. Focus will include academic, affective, adaptive, functioning, fine motor, and environmental measures. Content coverage will consist of an overview of assessment models including traditional, informal, dynamic, performance, curriculum-based, and alternative techniques and include an examination of evaluation procedures in the area of transition planning.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 329 Educ Stds w/High Incid Disabil (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive study of theoretical issues and research-based diagnosis, instructional planning and programmatic organization of instruction for children with learning problems. Content will cover curriculum design, development of programs of differential instruction involving evidence-based interventions that meet students’ needs based on formative assessment, developmental and educational information; integrated learning experiences; specialized adaptations and resources; practices and procedures validated for specific characteristics of learners and settings; prevention and intervention strategies from multiple theoretical approaches for individuals at-risk for academic or behavioral failure; systematic implementation of instructional variables; and systems management necessary for effective instruction of children with disabilities. Focus will also be given to the development and implementation of differentiated curriculum and curricular enhancements, and concepts and teaching practices related to the development and implementation of effective instructional programs for students with high incidence disabilities. Candidates will develop effective, evidence-based instructional strategies for all levels of support (PK-8). These will include: lesson plans, unit plans, IEPs, IFSPs, 504 plans, and intervention strategies that employ Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned Systems (http://www.pdesas.org). Candidates will be able to modify and implement curriculum including appropriate adaptations and technology, using the appropriate Academic Standards, Alternate Academic Standards where necessary, Assessment Anchors, and eligible content. In addition, candidates will demonstrate the ability to collaborate and plan for student outcomes and transition at designated times throughout the student's education, including Age 3 transition for Pre K-8, secondary transition procedures (7-12), and transition to post school success. This course of study will include: applying the knowledge of transition-related legislation in fields of special and vocational education, rehabilitation, labor and civil rights; developing and implementing a transition plan that integrates functional, academic, and vocational data aligned to identified post school outcomes; and administering and interpreting formal and informal career and vocational assessment approaches.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Restrictions: Students with the Education Basic Skills attribute may not enroll.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 339 Educ Stds w/Low Incid Disabil (3 credits)

This course addresses the definitions, characteristics, assessment and specific techniques for students needing adaptive and functional curricula. Characteristics are addressed in relation to why and how specialized instruction can meet the learning and developmental needs of these individuals, specifically in the areas of instruction, assistive learning, and language-communication. This includes research validated instructional strategies, adaptive and assistive technologies including augmentative communication systems, and communication and social interaction alternatives for non-speaking individuals. In addition, the course reviews behaviorally-based educational models for students with autism and other moderate and severe disabilities, and presents methods aimed at enhancing functional skill development in major life domains, with emphasis on community-based training and self-determination. Candidates will develop effective, evidence-based instructional strategies for all levels of support (PK-8). These will include: lesson plans, unit plans, IEPs, IFSPs, 504 plans, and intervention strategies that employ Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned Systems (http://www.pdesas.org). Candidates will be able to modify and implement curriculum including appropriate adaptations and technology, using the appropriate Academic Standards, Alternate Academic Standards where necessary, Assessment Anchors, and eligible content. In addition, candidates will demonstrate the ability to collaborate and plan for student outcomes and transition at designated times throughout the student's education, including Age 3 transition for Pre K-8, secondary transition procedures (7-12), and transition to post school success. This course of study will include: applying the knowledge of transition-related legislation in fields of special and vocational education, rehabilitation, labor and civil rights; developing and implementing a transition plan that integrates functional, academic, and vocational data aligned to identified post school outcomes; and administering and interpreting formal and informal career and vocational assessment approaches.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 349 Literacy & Intervention Strat (3 credits)

This course will focus on the development of competency in the implementation of explicit and systematic evidence-based instructional strategies designed to teach accuracy, fluency, comprehension, and monitoring strategies in literacy and content area reading to students with disabilities, including exceptional children in regular classroom, with emphasis on applying findings from research in reading to classroom practices, including children who are linguistically and culturally diverse. Content will include diagnostic-prescriptive techniques for remediation of reading and written language and associated learning disabilities. Candidates will develop lesson plans, unit plans, IEPs, IFSPs, 504 plans and intervention strategies that employ Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System. By using http://www.pdesas.org, candidates will be able to modify and implement curriculum using the appropriate Academic Standards, including Alternate Academic Standards where necessary, Assessment Anchors, and eligible content.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 359 Math & Content Area Interv Str (3 credits)

This course is an intensive and comprehensive study of research practices for the instruction of Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies for students with high incidence disabilities. Content will cover diagnostic planning, curriculum design, progress monitoring, and the development of student-specific programs involving evidence- based interventions. This course centers around the Response to Intervention model and most of the strategies discussed are based on the research which supports multi-sensory instruction, integrated learning experiences, and the multiple intelligences. Focus will also be given to the development of appropriate goals and the implementation of research-based curriculum, concepts, and instructional strategies which are most effective for students with high incidence disabilities. Candidates will develop lesson plans, unit plans, IEPs, IFSPs, 504 plans and intervention strategies that employ Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System. By using, candidates will be able to modify and implement curriculum using the appropriate Academic Standards, including Alternate Academic Standards where necessary, Assessment Anchors, and eligible content.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 369 Ed Stds w/Emot-Social Beh Disb (3 credits)

This course covers social, emotional, and behavioral disorders in an educational setting, as well as the most common types of mental illness that PreK-12 students may experience. In addition, the course covers possible causes, identification, assessment, behavioral data collection and recording, and effective instructional planning for these populations. Teacher candidates will develop skills in classroom management and crisis intervention, trauma-informed care, and creating a safe, inclusive, culturally responsive classroom climate conducive to learning and growth.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with the Education Basic Skills attribute.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 370 Special Topics (3 credits)

Topics will vary according to the semester in which the class is offered.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 379 Fam School & Comm:Diverse Soc (3 credits)

This course focuses on the process of family assessment and intervention, issues of family and professional collaboration and diversity, and methods of promoting adult communication and management strategies. It applies the knowledge of cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of socio-cultural and political contexts as they relate to the family, culture and society. It identifies the members of teams designed to support and optimize children's educational needs and social-emotional development and the network of community services and resources to individuals, families and groups affected by social, environmental, health and related problems.

Prerequisites: SPE 160

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Educational Studies, Elementary Educ 4th - 8th Gr, Elementary Educ Pre K -4th Gr, Secondary Education or Special Education.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 495 Special Ed. Student Teaching (6 credits)

This experience is designed as the capstone professional course in the Special Education major. It is to be the final course in the sequence of Special Education courses for certification. The student teaching experience approximates a full time working experiencefor a fourteen week semester. It includes a supervised teaching experience as well as a weekly seminar class in which issues related to student teaching are studies. Evaluations are conducted by the seminar instructor, the cooperating teacher and a university supervisor

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Elem - Special Education or Elementary Education.

Attributes: Undergraduate

SPE 498 SPE Studnt Teacher - Dual Prog (6 credits)

SPE 570 Special Ed Indpendent Study (3 credits)

SPE 600 Found & Current Issues: Sp Edu (3 credits)

This course is a critical study of the contemporary and controversial issues within the field of special education. Consideration will be given to the philosophical, psychological, and sociological basis of teacher education, including an analytical review of research-based curricula, programmatic innovations, policy issues and their effects, and ethical practices. Discussions will focus on evidence-based core concepts that contribute to effective program planning; investigation of cognitive, academic, behavioral, and psycho-social solutions and implications for those working with exceptional students; and future implications for the advancement of special education diagnostic and instructional services.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Doctoral or Graduate level students.

SPE 603 Thry&InstrPracticeStdntHighInc (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive study of theoretical issues and research-based diagnosis, instructional planning and programmatic organization of instruction for children with learning problems. Content will cover curriculum design, development of programs of differential instruction involving evidence-based interventions that meet students’ needs based on formative assessment, developmental and educational information; integrated learning experiences; specialized adaptations and resources; practices and procedures validated for specific characteristics of learners and settings; prevention and intervention strategies from multiple theoretical approaches for individuals at-risk for academic or behavioral failure; systematic implementation of instructional variables; and systems management necessary for effective instruction of children with disabilities. Focus will also be given to the development and implementation of differentiated curriculum and curricular enhancements, and concepts and teaching practices related to the development and implementation of effective instructional programs for students with high incidence disabilities.

Prerequisites: SPE 600

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 604 RsrchBsedModel:Lit,WritOrlLang (3 credits)

This course will focus on the development of competency in the implementation of explicit and systematic evidence-based instructional strategies designed to teach accuracy, fluency, comprehension, and monitoring strategies in literacy and content area reading to students with disabilities, including exceptional children in regular classroom, with emphasis on applying findings from research in reading to classroom practices, including children who are linguistically and culturally diverse. Content will include diagnostic-prescriptive techniques for remediation of reading and written language and associated learning disabilities.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 605 RsrchBasedModel:MathSciencePro (3 credits)

This course will focus on the development of competency in the implementation of explicit and systematic evidence-based instructional strategies designed to teach mathematics and content area subjects, including science and social studies. A study of theory and practice of effective teaching methodologies, combined with principles of differentiated instruction. Attention will be on teaching models and methods supported by research and emphasis will be placed on development of effective teaching procedures.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 606 ThryInstrPract:Emot/Soc/Behav (3 credits)

This course covers social, emotional, and behavioral disorders in an educational setting, as well as the most common types of mental illness that PreK-12 students may experience. In addition, the course covers possible causes, identification, assessment, behavioral data collection and recording, and effective instructional planning for these populations. Teacher candidates will develop skills in classroom management and crisis intervention, trauma-informed care, and creating a safe, inclusive, culturally responsive classroom climate conducive to learning and growth.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 607 ThryInstrPractStdntsw/LowIncid (3 credits)

This course covers personal, social, and emotional disorders in an educational setting, including methods of identification, assessment, and instructional planning; develops skills in effective classroom management and creating classroom climate conducive to learning and growth. It also provides comprehensive coverage of a variety of models of disciplines and aids students in building systems and conceptual models of total discipline, emphasizing activities promoting pupil motivation and classroom management and organization of the environment, instruction, behavior and record keeping.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 608 FamiliesSchls&Cmnty:CommCollab (3 credits)

This course focuses on the home-school partnerships, issues of family and professional collaboration and diversity, and methods of promoting adult communication and management strategies. It applies the knowledge of cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of socio-cultural and political contexts as they relate to the family, culture and society. It identifies the members of teams designed to support and optimize children’s educational needs and social-emotional development and the network of community services and resources available to individuals, families and groups affected by social, environmental, health and related problems.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 609 SPED Clinical Practicum I (3 credits)

This is a combined seminar/internship experience. This fieldwork experience will provide the candidate with an opportunity for in-depth varied and continuous instruction experiences. The practicum will include a variety of researched based instructional practices, assessment procedures, classroom management strategies and organizational strategies to provide structured opportunities for professional growth and stimulation. These experiences will enable the candidate to (a) apply the knowledge and skills acquired through his/her study and previous experience to actual classroom situations that a teacher will face in a Response to Intervention Classroom; (b) integrate the concepts and skills from different prior learning experiences as well as researched based principles in reading, comprehension and writing for educational programming and apply to individual situations; (c) become involved in the routine functions of a classroom teacher including planning, assessment, progress monitoring and collaboration with peers. Course requirements are designed to meet Departmental and Commonwealth standards.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 610 SPED Clinical Practicum II (3 credits)

This is a combined seminar/internship experience. This fieldwork experience will provide the candidate with an opportunity for in-depth varied and continuous instruction experiences. The practicum will include a variety of researched based instructional practices, assessment procedures, classroom management strategies and organizational strategies to provide structured opportunities for professional growth and stimulation. These experiences will enable the candidate to (a) apply the knowledge and skills acquired through his/her study and previous experience to actual classroom situations that a teacher will face in a Response to Intervention Classroom; (b) integrate the concepts and skills from different prior learning experiences as well as researched based principles in mathematics and content areas for educational programming and apply to individual situations; (c) become involved in the routine functions of a classroom teacher including planning, assessment, progress monitoring and collaboration with peers. Course requirements are designed to meet Departmental and Commonwealth standards.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 611 Mental Health Literacy w/Field (3 credits)

This course will introduce the concept of social, emotional, and behavioral wellness for PK-12 students. Teacher candidates will be able to define and describe social and emotional learning and identify programs that promote social and emotional competence. They will also be able to describe and define Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), trauma, and mental illness, including how such experiences and conditions can impact the growth, development, and learning of children and adolescents. This course also covers the role of schools in reducing risk factors and increasing protective factors, building assets and fostering resilience in students who experienced trauma and/or mental health issues.

Prerequisites: SPE 600 or SPE 602 or SPE 603 or SPE 606 or SPE 607 or SPE 700

SPE 613 Incl. Class Practices w/Field (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive study of theoretical issues and research-based diagnosis, instructional planning, and programmatic organization of instruction for children with disabilities in inclusive environments. Content will cover curriculum design, development of programs of differential instruction involving evidence-based interventions that meet students' needs based on formative assessment, developmental and educational information; integrated learning experiences; specialized adaptations and resources; practices and procedures validated for specific characteristics of learners and settings; prevention and intervention strategies from multiple theoretical approaches for individuals at-risk for academic or behavioral failure; systematic implementation of instructional variables; systems management necessary for effective instruction of children with disabilities; and promote an understanding of the underlying theories, issues and methods for managing classroom environments.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 614 Social, Emot, & Behav Wellness (3 credits)

This course covers the roles of other relevant child-serving systems within communities that can be supportive to addressing matters associated with social, emotional and behavioral wellness of PK-12 students (e.g., children’s mental health, juvenile justice). Confidentiality and professional ethics will be emphasized and required. Teacher candidates will apply skills in communicating and collaborating effectively with children and youth who have experienced trauma and/or mental illness, as well as their families and school and community partners. This course also allows teacher candidates to practice advocating professionally for children and youth and their social, emotional and behavioral wellness.

Prerequisites: SPE 611

SPE 620 Fund SE Prac for School Ldrs (3 credits)

This course is a critical study of the contemporary and controversial issues within the field of special education emphases will be placed on the role of the supervisor or administrator. Consideration will be given to the philosophical, psychological, and sociological basis of teacher education, including an analytical review of research-based curricula, programmatic innovations, policy issues and their effects, and ethical practices. Discussions will focus on evidence-based core concepts that contribute to effective program planning; investigation of cognitive, academic, behavioral, and psycho-social solutions and implications for those working with exceptional students; and future implications for the advancement of special education diagnostic and instructional services.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 621 Law, Pol & Proced for SE Sup (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the legal rights of students and their families in the field of special education, with particular focus on the supervisor’s role in implementing and monitoring policy and procedures in districts’ special education programs. Content covered includes an overview of laws and litigation and the current status of legislation dealing with special education. The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law, and judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. This course will focus on the supervisor’s role in addressing issues of identification, IEP development and implementation, equal protection, extended school year (and day), functional behavioral analysis, teacher assistants, least restrictive environments, transition, procedural due process, complaint resolution, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting students with disabilities. Additionally, attention will be given to preparation of focus audits, data collection, basic compliance issues, communicating and collaborating with parents and maintaining active parental support groups. Also, case studies will be conducted that deal with issue, rule, analysis and conclusion (IRAC), as a tool to provide a framework for supervisors to rapidly increase their understanding of emerging, complex legal issues

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 622 Admin & Supv:Spec Ed Progs (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide the student an opportunity for in-depth understanding of the supervisory and administrative duties for the role of Supervisor of Special Education. This course provides the Special Education Supervisor candidate with a specified professional knowledge-base included in the following aspects of leadership: decision-making, leadership theory, communication skills, human relations theory, administrative theory, policy analysis/evaluation, supervision/assessment practices.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 623 Advanced Fieldwork/Seminar (3 credits)

This is a combined seminar/internship experience. This fieldwork experience will provide the candidate with an opportunity for in-depth varied and continuous administrative experiences. The practicum will attempt to include a blend of all the administrative experiences possible to provide professional growth, maturity and stimulation. These experiences will enable the candidate to (a) apply the knowledge and skills acquired through his/her study and previous experience to actual problem and day-to-day administrative duties faced by a Supervisor of Special Education; (b) integrate the concepts and skills from different prior learning experiences and focus on individual situations; (c) become involved in the routine functions of schools/school districts and Intermediate Units.

SPE 624 Adv Super & Curr Fieldwk/Sem (3 credits)

This is a combined seminar/internship experience. This fieldwork experience will provide the candidate with an opportunity for in-depth varied and continuous administrative experiences. The practicum will attempt to include a blend of all the administrative experiences possible to provide professional growth, maturity and stimulation. These experiences will enable the candidate to (a) apply the knowledge and skills acquired through his/her study and previous experience to actual problem and day-to-day administrative duties faced by a Supervisor of Special Education based on the Educational Leadership course content; (b) integrate the concepts and skills from different prior learning experiences and focus on individual situations; (c) become involved in the routine functions of schools/school districts and Intermediate Units. Course requirements are designed to meet Departmental and Commonwealth standards. The requirements of this course will be a continuation of SPE 623, specifically, an additional 180 hours, for a total of 360 hours of fieldwork activities under the supervision of University faculty.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 626 EducAssess & ProgMonitor PK-12 (3 credits)

This course will provide an in-depth presentation of the complex issue of assessment, including an examination of evaluation procedures, from pre-referral intervention, eligibility/placement/ program decision-making to progress monitoring of scientifically-based instructional interventions based on Response to Intervention (RTI). Focus will include academic, affective, work-study skill, adaptive functioning, fine motor, and environmental measures. Content coverage will consist of an overview of assessment models including traditional, informal, dynamic, performance, curriculum-based, and alternative techniques. Additional course topics will address legislation, regulations, topical issues, emerging evaluation trends, test modifications/accommodations, parent involvement and assessment/progress reporting.

Prerequisites: SPE 600

SPE 630 Design&Tech Differentiated Ins (3 credits)

This course will provide comprehensive coverage of what is involved in the consideration, assessment and implementation of assistive technology for students with special needs including those with specific learning disabilities found most commonly in regular and special education classrooms today. Additional topics will include current and emerging technologies used to enhance instruction for both regular and special learners; school practices related to technology integration and effective uses of technology in the general and special education classroom.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 640 Student Teaching PK-12 (3 credits)

This course is the four week student teaching experience required for graduate students seeking special education PK-12 certification who do have an initial teaching certificate. This course is limited to students who were admitted to the program prior to May 2021. The focus of this course is on developing skills for creating classroom climate conducive to student achievement and effective inclusive classroom management. Course content will include addressing the specific needs of students with disabilities. Student teachers are expected to complete 140 hours (equal to four 35-hour weeks) of direct teaching/co-teaching. Time in the classroom may be spread out over more than four weeks, but must equal 140 hours. The class may be in a public (urban or suburban), private, charter, segregated special education, or parochial school but must contain at least 10% of students who have Individual Educational Plans (IEPs). In all placements, student teaching supervisors conduct formal classroom observations and complete PDE evaluations while collaborating with the cooperating or mentor teacher(s) in supervising and evaluating the student teacher.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 645 Student Teaching Certification (1 credit)

This course is the four week student teaching experience required for those who have an initial teaching certification, are adding special education PK-12 certification, and have taken the inclusive classroom practices course. The focus of this course is on developing skills for creating classroom climate conducive to student achievement and effective inclusive classroom management. Course content will include addressing the specific needs of students with disabilities. Student teachers are expected to complete 140 hours (equal to four 35-hour weeks) of direct teaching/co-teaching. Time in the classroom may be spread out over more than four weeks, but must equal 140 hours. The class may be in a public (urban or suburban), private, charter, segregated special education, or parochial school but must contain at least 10% of students who have Individual Educational Plans (IEPs). In all placements, student teaching supervisors conduct formal classroom observations and complete PDE evaluations while collaborating with the cooperating or mentor teacher(s) in supervising and evaluating the student teacher.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 646 Student Teaching Certification (6 credits)

This course is the full semester student teaching experience required for graduate students seeking special education PK-12 certification who do not have an initial teaching certificate. The focus of this course is on developing skills for creating classroom climate conducive to student achievement and effective inclusive classroom management skills. Course content will also include addressing the specific needs of students with disabilities in an inclusive setting. Student teachers are expected to complete a full semester (12 weeks) of direct teaching/co-teaching. The class may be in a public (urban or suburban), private, charter, segregated special education, or parochial school but must contain at least 10% of students who have Individual Educational Plans (IEPs). Student teaching supervisors conduct formal classroom observations and complete PDE 430 evaluations while collaborating with the cooperating or mentor teacher(s) in supervising and evaluating the student teacher.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 670 Special Topics: Special Educa (3 credits)

The theme or topic for this course will change as topical interests among graduate students and faculty change.

SPE 700 SpecialEducation Law/Policy (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the legal rights of students and their families in the field of special education. Students will explore the source, history, and current status of special education law. Content covered will include an overview of laws and litigation affecting special education. The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law, and judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. This course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting students with disabilities.

SPE 701 Cog Proc: Resrch Brain Studies (3 credits)

This course provides an integrative survey of knowledge and research in the cognitive and neurological development of the young mind. The content is designed to connect cognition, neuroscience and educational practice with the critical periods of child development, including language development, visual systems, and psycho-social growth. Attention will be given to the basic structures of the brain and their corresponding dynamic functions, how neurons communicate with each other, and ways that networks of cells function in the vision, memory, and learning processes. The interaction and effects of learning and thinking and how the brain processes, consolidates and internalizes information will be explored.

SPE 702 Culturally Responsive Teaching (3 credits)

This course is designed to align instruction along with the assets and differential needs of diverse student populations through applying and incorporating multicultural perspectives into the teaching-learning process to maximize the academic, cognitive, personal, and social aspects of student learning. It will provide ways to design and deliver culturally responsive strategies to work with culturally and linguistically diverse students and empower their families in the teaching and learning process. The course focuses on addressing challenges to the reading achievement of culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse students with disabilities. Issues covered will include assessment and intervention, curricula development and social/affective skills related to family, community, values and culture of students from different cultural and ethnic groups

SPE 710 WRP: Intro Multisens Lang Inst (1 credit)

This online Wilson introductory course examines the definition of dyslexia and common characteristics, reading research and the five areas of reading in relation to students beyond grade two with persistent phonological coding deficits. Specifically studies the Wilson Reading System® (WRS), including student identification and placement, program implementation, progress monitoring, scheduling, and creating a successful classroom environment; principles of language structure; and how to teach language with direct, multisensory methods. Wilson Reading Certification course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 711 WRP: Int Instr- NonRepsRdr 1-3 (3 credits)

This course presents in detail the multisensory structured language instruction that is required for teaching students beyond grade two with word-level deficits who are unresponsive to previous instruction. This online course provides practical application of reading research, with particular emphasis on phonological awareness, phonics and spelling at the beginning levels of decoding and encoding as well as expands upon these concepts with specific instruction in the closed syllable pattern. Provides specific procedures to teach the concepts presented in Wilson Reading System (WRS) Steps 1-3. Additional topics include accuracy and automaticity of word recognition, fluency with decodable and authentic text, vocabulary and listening/reading comprehension at beginning stages of reading. Wilson Reading Certification course.

Prerequisites: SPE 710

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 712 WRP: Int Instr- NonRepsRdr 4-6 (3 credits)

This is a continuation of the Wilson Steps 1-3 on-line course. Presents in detail the multisensory structured language instruction that is required for teaching students beyond grade two with word-level deficits who are unresponsive to previous instruction. This online course provides practical application of reading research, with particular emphasis on phonological awareness, phonics and spelling at the beginning levels of decoding and encoding as well as expands upon these concepts with specific instruction in the vowel-consonant-e, open, and consonant-le syllable patterns. Provides specific procedures to teach the concepts presented in Wilson Reading System® (WRS) Steps 4-6. Additional topics include the ten critical points of the Wilson Reading System, dyslexia, non-controlled text, and handwriting. Wilson Reading Certification course.

Prerequisites: SPE 710 and SPE 711

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 713 WRP: Int Instr- NonRepsRdrPrac (3 credits)

This course, a supervised practicum, requires identifying and securing a practicum student in grades 4 - 12 with significant word level deficits, selected according to WRS practicum student selection criteria. Although not required, a second practicum student is highly recommended. The practicum entails successful delivery of a minimum of 60 Wilson Reading System (WRS) lessons and teaching mastery through WRS Step 4.2. A Wilson trainer observes the participant working with his /her student five times during the practicum via videoconferencing. Must demonstrate that the teaching plan is based on continuous assessment of the student’s needs. *This course is completed over two semesters, generally spanning one academic year. Please Note: Although completion of SPE 710, SPE 711, SPE 712 and SPE 713 are required for WRS Level I Certification, certification is not guaranteed and is dependent upon successful fulfillment of all Wilson requirements.

Prerequisites: SPE 710 and SPE 711 (may be taken concurrently) and SPE 712 (may be taken concurrently)

SPE 720 Intro ASD: Caus Diag & Advoc (3 credits)

This course will provide candidates with an introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). With the increase in the number of individuals being diagnosed with ASD, this course will examine the challenge ASD presents to families, educators, students, related service providers, advocates, and policy makers. Course content will include an overview of ASD; family issues and challenges; ASD screening, diagnosis and assessment; an overview of intervention and treatment approaches; accessing appropriate supports and services; policy issues; advocacy and the experience of individuals living with ASD. Autism Spectrum Disorder Specialist Endorsement course.

SPE 721 Aug & Alt Com & Soc Stratg (3 credits)

This course will focus on a wide range of current research and evidence-based practices in the area of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) as it is implemented to increase, improve, and maintain functional communication skills of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In addition, specific strategies and techniques to address socialization skills for individuals with ASD as well as their communication partners will be addressed. Case studies, discussions, and activities will be utilized to personalize these strategies and techniques. Autism Spectrum Disorder Specialist Endorsement course.

SPE 722 Evid Based Prac: AI&I Method (3 credits)

This course will provide comprehensive coverage of the importance of using evidence-based practice in assessment, instruction, and implementation of interventions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Course content will include identifying the legal basis and requirements for evidence-based practice; a review of how to locate and evaluate evidence in the literature base; ( a review of the theoretical basis of, and evaluation of the empirical evidence for screening and assessments; a review of the theoretical basis of, and evaluation of the empirical evidence for screening and assessments; the continuum of interventions from traditional behavior to social-developmental-pragmatic; comprehensive program approaches; and instructional strategies in the classroom. Additional topics will include the use of medical, dietary, and sensory interventions in the schools; pseudoscience and fad interventions; and finding the middle ground between parents and professionals in the decision-making process. Autism Spectrum Disorder Specialist Endorsement course.

SPE 723 Autism: Behv Manag Approaches (3 credits)

This course will examine and introduce the major therapies/educational interventions that have been developed to treat autism and related pervasive developmental disorders. Applied behavior analysis (ABA), an empirically- validated treatment for individuals with autism and related disabilities will be discussed in detail. In addition, other emerging treatments including Greenspan, Relationship Development Intervention, and the principles of Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS) in Universal Design for Learning (UDL) will be examined in relation to ABA. In addition, scientific criteria will be compared to pseudoscientific criteria for various interventions. This course is relevant for both novices and experienced practitioners in the field of autism treatment. Autism Spectrum Disorder Specialist Endorsement course.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 730 Ed Found - Deaf & Hard of Hear (3 credits)

This course introduces basic concepts for the education of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. Topics covered will include the social construction of deafness and hearing loss; language acquisition and literacy development in children who are deaf and hard of hearing; educational philosophies and approaches; sign language systems in education; assistive technology including cochlear implants; placement options; supports for inclusive practices; and specially designed instruction, including adaptations for students who are deaf and hard of hearing and children with additional special needs.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 731 Lang, Lit & Comm Dev-Deaf & HH (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the components of language, normal developmental sequences in children, and the impact of hearing loss upon language acquisition. Auditory and visual strategies for facilitating language acquisition among students who are deaf and hard of hearing will be included, as will protocols for integrating language instruction into academic content area instruction. Students will be introduced to the array of communication options available to families of children who are deaf and hard of hearing, early communication behaviors expressed by young children, and strategies for supporting families making communication decisions. The course will examine the components of literacy in conjunction with characteristics of scientifically-based reading research and principles of effective instruction. Students will examine reading programs created for students who are deaf and hard of hearing, create lesson plans, select websites and technology tools available online to support these lessons, practice using scoring rubrics, and develop personal plans for expanding their own communication skills over the course of the next year.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 732 Curr, Inst & Lrn Env-Deaf & HH (3 credits)

This course content will cover what teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing need to know in order to choose and effectively implement the most appropriate methodology, evaluation procedures, goal/objective sets and lesson plans. Focus will also be on ongoing assessment measures to monitor student progress and to validate the effectiveness of specific instructional methods and materials through data collection. In addition, attention will be given to how curriculum and instruction are differentiated through the service delivery spectrum: consultation, itinerant, resource room and full time class (supplemental) instruction

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 733 List & Spk Skills - Deaf & HH (3 credits)

This course will provide information regarding the etiology and age of onset of hearing loss, anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism, degree and type of hearing loss, and interpretation of audiological results. The course will also offer information on auditory skill development, the utilization of various forms of amplification including hearing aids, cochlear implants, and FM systems, and the relationship of classroom acoustics to auditory access. Additionally, information in the area of spoken language development will be provided, including speech sound acquisition, development of vocabulary, syntax and pragmatics, and the relationship of listening and spoken language to literacy.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 734 Sign Comm in Instruct Settings (3 credits)

This course introduces and expands upon the use of a variety of sign languages and sign communication systems in instructional settings. Among the topics covered are the history and structure of American Sign Language (ASL), the nature and characteristics of artificial sign systems developed to represent English and hybrid systems such as those described as "contact signing." The parameters and use of fingerspelling as an educational tool will also be included. Various philosophies and methodologies of incorporating sign communication in educational settings will be covered. Students will be exposed to the appropriate use of sign languages and sign systems in instructional settings and how they may be used to enhance learning by deaf and hard of hearing students.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

SPE 739 Student Teach & Prof Seminar (6 credits)

This is an individually designed field experience under approved supervision (including seminar meetings). This experience is designed as the capstone professional course for students seeking the Hearing Impaired (PK-12) certification (PA). It approximates full-time working/teaching experience for one full semester. At the conclusion of this experience, students must have demonstrated proficiencies in instructional management and specially designed instruction, student engagement and motivation, curriculum planning, learning theory, problem solving in an educational setting, using computers in the classroom, integrating reading, language, and literacy skills in all classrooms, the use of audiovisual materials in the classroom, communicating effectively with students and staff members who are deaf or hard of hearing in their preferred languages and modes of communication, the identification of instructional resources, assessment of student achievement, the development of IEP goals and objectives, management of amplification systems, assessment and development of listening and spoken language skills, consultation with regular classroom teachers, modification of the classroom acoustic environment, and development of student compensating strategies. The fieldwork course is typically the final course in a certification sequence. Includes a weekly online seminar session.

Prerequisites: SPE 600 and SPE 608 and SPE 612 and SPE 730 and SPE 731 and SPE 732 and SPE 733 and SPE 734

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.