Interdisciplinary Health Serv (IHS)

IHS 110 Psyc Aspcts Illness & Disab (3 credits)

A survey of the psychological, social, and behavioral theories as they relate to the experiences of chronic illness and disability with particular emphasis on how bio psychosocial factors impact motivation, social support, and life satisfaction. Current theories, as they apply to the epidemiology of public health behaviors throughout the life cycle are evaluated. An inquiry into the health needs of women, children, and ethnic minorities is explored, as well as how society perceives and responds to people with illnesses and disabilities.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 150 First Year Seminar (3 credits)

This is a first year seminar course designed to introduce non-major students to several major themes of American health care and to a comparison of this country’s health care system in relation to the health care systems of other countries. These macro health care issues include the social, political, and cultural foundations for health care, the economics of health care delivery, the ethical frameworks countries use to establish their interpretation of acceptable performance and behavior, the process by which the United States and other countries develop and implement their health policies, and what are now global trends for health care regardless of historical past, political system, or social cultures. The course requires significant analysis and critical review, application of data mining and literature reviews to study the unique aspects of the American health care system and how this system compares to those of other countries.

Attributes: First-Year Seminar, Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 151 Global Health Care (3 credits)

IHS 211 HlthCareSystem/ Responsibility (3 credits)

An introduction to public health and the organization and structure of the health care delivery system in the United States. This course will focus upon the various types of health care services, where these services are provided, ways to assess and keep track of diseases and public health care needs, health policies, and administration of these services. Also included will be a discussion of how legal, economic, psychological, cultural, political, ethical, and technological forces affect health care and the people who provide it. An introduction to managed care including current and evolving models, terminology, and differences among insurers and payer types will be included.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 216 Alcohol, Drugs & Society (3 credits)

IHS 217 Mental Health & Society (3 credits)

This course examines the connections between mental health and society. What are the major forms of mental and behavioral health and illness? How widespread are mental disorders and what predicts their occurrence? What impact do they have on society and institutions such as health care and criminal justice? How does mental illness relate to social norms? What roles do psychiatric diagnoses play in society and how do diagnoses affect individuals relative to society?

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 243 HelpHealing:EthicsCommPersonal (3 credits)

IHS 244 Health Care Administration (3 credits)

This course focuses on the fundamental principles and theories of administration in a number of different types of health care and public health organizations. It covers areas of management, supervision, and leadership required in today’s complex health care settings such as hospitals, public health agencies, physician practices, clinical departments, ambulatory and long-term care settings, and health education programs with an emphasis on human resources, finance, budgeting, planning, customer relations, systems design, outcome measures, and program evaluation. It recognizes the unique characteristics of health care organizations and what is needed to operate clinical, educational, and public health programs in this environment. Critical administrative strategies will be presented giving students opportunities to understand their importance and how they may be applied. Through various instructional methodologies such as case studies, team assignments, guest presentations, and role-plays, students will experience the rich, exciting environment of health care administration.

IHS 248 Hlth and the School aged Child (3 credits)

This course introduces students to some of the unique health issues faced by the school-aged child. In contemporary society, schools have become one of the primary avenues of health care; the school is responsible for assuring that a child has received all of his/her required vaccinations and regular health examinations. Schools provide routine health screenings for diseases such as high blood pressure, and often are the first to notice mental health problems such as Depression, ADHD, eating disorders, and addictions. In addition, schools are required to provide regular health education programs relative to prevention of illness, physical fitness, and sex education. Issues such as coping with childhood chronic illnesses including Type I Diabetes and Asthma, what happens when a child is diagnosed with cancer, AIDS, a learning or physical disability, or Depression, as well as the importance of proper nutrition, physical fitness, mental health, and the reduction of risky health behavior will be addressed.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 251 Healthcare Law and Ethics (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of legal and ethical issues central to the health care delivery system and their impact on individual institutions and professionals. The relationships among biomedical and technology, societal changes, court rulings, and governmental legislation within the context of the healthcare system will be examined. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP)

IHS 252 Health Care Policy (3 credits)

This course will explore health care policy issues (such as Medicare, Social Security, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, AIDS/HIV programs) and lead to a general understanding of the health care policy process. Focus will be placed on examining the various factors that lead to health care policy at the state and national level, and how health care policy impacts health care professionals’ ability to deliver care and consumers’ ability to utilize care in an ever-changing environment. The role of the political process to address issues revolving around cost of health care, access to and quality of that care will be addressed. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 253 Nutrition:Health & Disease (3 credits)

The number of children who are obese or overweight in the United States has tripled in the past twenty years. Being overweight puts people at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other health related problems. A basic knowledge in the science of food helps people make wise food choices, avoid disease, and to live longer, more productive lives. This course explores fundamentals of nutrition, diet-related diseases and current issues. The content material of IHS 253 Nutrition: Health and Disease overlaps with the content of CHM 110 Food Chemistry I and CHM 111 Food Chemistry II. Students may take either Nutrition or the Food Chemistry courses, not both.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 255 Human Sexuality and Disease (3 credits)

Human Sexuality and Disease explores the biological, psychosocial, behavioral and cultural perspectives of human sexuality. The course has a strong emphasis on sexual anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, and health behaviors.

Attributes: Gender Studies Course, Undergraduate

IHS 256 HIV/AIDS (3 credits)

This course offers the student the opportunity for an in-depth assessment of one of the most critical public health issues facing the world today. Topics include current HIV/AIDS information as well as exploration of related issues including politics, sexuality, homophobia, ethical Issues, discrimination, international implications, and worldwide economic effects. This class will include site visits to local agencies in the Philadelphia area as well. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of an ethics intensive course.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Attributes: Ethics Intensive (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 263 Theory:AddictionAddictiveBehav (3 credits)

This course involves the study of the nature and causes of substance abuse and other compulsive behaviors. The historical and socio/cultural/economic trends are evaluated in view of current and new addiction theories and treatment interventions. Emphasis is placed upon the relation of addiction to family and work environments.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 270 ViolenceAggression:Deconstruct (3 credits)

IHS 276 The Continuum of Adult Health (3 credits)

This course will focus on the demographic, political, economic and psychosocial issues of adults along the continuum of health from community-based services to home care, hospice, hospital and nursing home settings. The course will focus on the interventions that health providers can use to maximize safety, function and social stability in the community, deferring or delaying institutionalization. Specific topics will include fall prevention, medication safety, telemedicine applications, HIV transmission prevention, improving cognitive function, improving nutrition the effects of widowhood, increasing longevity, improving the quality of life and the quality of care of adults and the avoidance of hospitalization and nursing home placement.

IHS 280 Global Health Disparities (3 credits)

IHS 285 Med Terminology & Health Comm (3 credits)

Students, within the Interdisciplinary Health Services Major/Minor, are exposed to many courses related to acute illness, disease and prevention. Ongoing advancement in the allied health professions dictates the need for students to understand proper medical and anatomical terminology to include its source language, evolution and application in the field of medicine and allied health. The need to understand proper medical and anatomical terminology is imperative as this language provides proficient communication between members of the same profession, minimizing the potential for misinterpretation in such a highly critical field. This course will introduce and educate students to a substantial medical vocabulary comprised of prefixes (location of an organ, the number of parts, or time involved), word roots (body part) and suffixes (condition,disease process, or procedure) which are utilized by health care practitioners as a devoted language. This course will describe the human body, coupled components, conditions, processes and medical treatments; providing the proper medical vocabulary for each.

IHS 315 The Culture of Addiction (3 credits)

IHS 323 Health and Society (3 credits)

Health and health care are of central concern in a post-industrial society. This course examines sociological issues in health and health care, with special focus on the contemporary United States. How do such factors as race, gender, and social class shape physical and mental illness? How is health care organized, and what professions and organizations make up the health care sector? How have health and health care become major social problems, and what are the prospects for major social change in society’s response to health issues? During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of a diversity, non- western or globalization course.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 325 Theories:Disease Prevent Mgmt (3 credits)

Health theories provide practitioners with tools to understand health-related behaviors and develop effective interventions against disease. This course introduces students to commonly used models and theories, such as the Health Belief Model, Stages of Change, Diffusion of Innovations, Social Cognitive Theory, Health Communications, and Social Marketing. The theoretical foundations apply to the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, heart disease, cancer, and injuries

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 331 Statistics & Research Methods (3 credits)

Statistics and Research Methods introduces students to research methods and data analyses as they apply to research in the health services field. Topics are human participant protections, research designs, instrumentation, validity, reliability, quantitative and qualitative data analyses, and drawing conclusions. Students are responsible for developing a research idea, writing an extensive review of the literature, analyzing data, and discussing the results. This course is approved as a faith justice studies course. During the regular fall and spring semesters, this course fulfills the overlay requirement of a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: ENG 101

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 331L Stats Research Methods Lab (0 credits)

IHS 343 HelpHealing:EthicsCommPersonal (3 credits)

This course will provide students with a hands-on practicum-style learning environment and explores health- related counseling theories and techniques to build the skills necessary for engaging with patients and clients as future health professionals. Using a three-phase approach which merges contemporary health issues (e.g. violence, addiction, overweight/obesity) with skill-building activities, students develop the basic skills needed for effective one-on-one, group, and crisis counseling to support prevention and treatment of disease. Students will gain competencies including but not limited to: interviewing techniques; active listening; decision making; problem-solving; and factors affecting energy, control, and symptoms of patients and clients. The course will also emphasize basic models in counseling (e.g. behavioral counseling; Gestalt, Rational-Emotive and Rogerian therapies; crisis counseling) and proven helping techniques. Upon completion, students will be able to critically assess, discuss, and demonstrate effective counseling and assessment with individuals and groups.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 345 DyingWell:The Hospice Movement (3 credits)

This course examines how people across cultures and throughout history have responded to the challenge of dying. It will examine cultural practices relating to treatment of the death and to care of the dying, as well as the process of confronting one’s own death from a psychological perspective. After describing the limitations of the traditional medical (curative) model’s approach to death, the course will study the hospice movement: its history, philosophy, and practices of caring. In addition to specific models and essential components of hospice care, administrative issues (legal, reimbursement, human resources) will be addressed. This course will include presentations by and interviews with hospice workers, as well as a survey of hospices in the metropolitan area. This course includes a weekly service-learning requirement.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 346 Admin of HlthCare/PublicHealth (3 credits)

IHS 349 Managed Health Care (3 credits)

IHS 354 Diversity Ldrship in Hlth Care (3 credits)

The impact of valuing diversity and multiculturalism is profound in the healthcare field. Research has long suggested that health outcomes and health services delivery are improved when caregivers and managers integrate genuine valuing of diversity in their operations. This course offers students the means to develop effective awareness, knowledge and sensitivity concerning diversity and multiculturalism. It provides strategies and insights allowing students to build their leadership skills in this critical area and then apply such knowledge and competencies in the field itself.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 357 Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 credits)

IHS 359 PlanningEvaluatingHealthPromo (3 credits)

Community health education programs are a cost effective way to prevent injuries and diseases. The most effective programs are theory based, include an evaluation component, and are tailored to the audience. This course takes students through the process of health promotion planning including theoretical foundations, needs assessment, program development, and evaluation. Development and implementation of a health promotion project is a core component of the course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 360 TherapRolesAnimals in Hlthcare (3 credits)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of animals in formal roles of support within society. Various levels of animal-assisted interventions and their legal implications, including Emotional Support Animals, Animal-Assisted Activities, Animal-Assisted Therapy, and Service Animals will be reviewed. The role of animals providing services to people with autism spectrum disorders, children with cancer, individuals with psychiatric disorders, the elderly, and individuals with physical disabilities will be discussed. The history of Animal-Assisted interventions leading up to their current status will be addressed. Prerequisites: IHS 110, IHS 465, PSY 208, or SOC 217.

Prerequisites: IHS 110 or IHS 465 or PSY 208 or SOC 217

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 368 Just Hlth Care Dev Nations (3 credits)

An investigation of adequate health care as a fundamental human right. The course will proceed from the premise that socially induced needs are a result of historical development of material and social conditions, coupled with a social consensus that some things are necessary for happiness, social life, or some other goal. It will consider the inability of many societies to supply adequate health care as an issue of basic personal dignity, a claim against society, and as a matter of justice. The course will examine the issue of just health care for all peoples from both public health and ethical perspectives. Latin American Studies.

Prerequisites: PHL 154

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Globalization Course (New GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 370 Special Topics in Health Servi (3 credits)

IHS 441 Alt Med/Non TraditionalTherapy (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the history and practice of complementary medicine and non-tradition therapies. Included will be an overview of the debate between eastern and western societal approaches to medicine, the relationship between mind and body in health and illness, how cultural issues affect the way individuals feel about and comply with their medical treatment, some of the non-traditional therapies used in the treatment of physical and psychological illness such as art and music therapy, and the overall emphasis on wellness promotion.

Attributes: Diversity Course (New GEP), Globalization Course (New GEP), Non-Western Studies (GEP), Undergraduate

IHS 458 Public Health & Epidemiology (3 credits)

This course introduces the basic principles and methodologies used in epidemiology and will demonstrate how these are applied to the field of public health. Topics to be covered will include historical perspectives of epidemiology, measures of disease occurrence and association, clinical epidemiology, disease screening, causal inference, and study design.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 458L Epidemiology Lab (0 credits)

IHS 465 Intro:Autism Spectrum Disorder (3 credits)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD’s), including Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Asperger’s Syndrome, are common, occurring in 1 in 166 individuals. The result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, ASD’s impact social interactions and communication skills. The types of ASD’s range in severity from very low functioning associated with significant cognitive deficits and highly disruptive behaviors, to very high functioning, associated with highly gifted intelligence and "quirky" behaviors. This course introduces students to the neurology, symptoms, diagnostic criteria, causes, biomedical treatments, and behavioral interventions, as well as to the impact on individuals with ASD’s, families, friends, school districts, the economy, and society with regard to functioning, coping, prognosis, and outcomes.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 466 ABA and Autism Treatment (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the current research-based interventions in the field of autism that include applied behavior analysis (verbal behavior, discrete trial instruction, picture communication, Pivotal Response Training, Competent Learner Model), TEACCH, and social skills. Students will gain a general understanding of applied behavior analysis principles and how they can be used across multiple environments (home, school, early intervention, clinics) to address the various social, behavioral and communication deficits of individuals with autism. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 467 Social Skills Dev. and Autism (3 credits)

Social skills are learned behaviors that individuals need to successfully navigate social interactions and relationships. This course introduces students to a variety of approaches for assessing and improving the social skills of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders. A variety of empirically validated methodologies will be discussed, including incidental teaching; video modeling; social stories; and using textual cues. Students will learn to apply these methodologies to teach skills such as joint attention, greetings, conversations, social play, self-awareness, perspective-taking, critical thinking, developing friendships, and community and home success. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 468 Resources &Advocacy for Autism (3 credits)

Intervention and therapeutic services are critical to improving the lives of children and adults, and advocating for individuals with autism is an important process in securing these services. This course introduces students to the role that therapists, physicians, families, case workers and community agents serve in advocating for those with autism, where services are provided, how they are funded, what they offer those with autism, and how to advocate for individuals with autism. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 469 Adult/Transition Autism Serv (3 credits)

This course focuses on understanding the issues facing adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Students will learn about issues adults with ASD face including independent living skills, friendships, sexual relationships and marriage, finding and coping with employment, secondary education, post-secondary education, psychiatric disturbances in adulthood, legal issues, and enhancing independence. Students will learn the newest research and intervention techniques to promote a successful transition to adulthood. IHS 465 is recommended prior to or concurrently with this course.

IHS 470 Senior Seminar (3 credits)

IHS 471 Special Topics in Autism (3 credits)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), including Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Aspergers Syndrome, are common. The result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, ASD’s impact social interactions and communication skills. The types of ASD range in severity from very low functioning associated with significant cognitive deficits and highly disruptive behaviors, to very high functioning, associated with highly gifted intelligence and “quirky” behaviors. This course is a continuation of Intro to Autism Spectrum Disorder and provides advanced topics in the causes, treatments and implications of autism. The format for this course is seminar style. This will primarily consistent of significant student involvement.

Prerequisites: IHS 465

IHS 472 Seminar in Autism (4 credits)

In this course, important topics on Autism Spectrum Disorders will be discussed in more detail and students will design an individualized behavioral project. This project will help students to focus on the specific needs of children or adults with autism by developing particular types of goals, services, programs, or other relevant activities. This course will also involve designing a plan for working with individuals with autism to help improve the quality of their functioning in meaningful areas of their lives. In addition, this course will serve as the third practicum course for BCaBA certification. This course will also include the third practicum requirement for BCaBA certification. Only open to students completing the BCaBA sequence. Prerequisites: IHS 465; IHS 466; IHS 467; IHS 473; IHS 474 and Senior Status.

Prerequisites: IHS 465 and IHS 466 and IHS 467 and IHS 473 and IHS 474

IHS 473 Advanced Principles of ABA (4 credits)

This course is designed to expand upon the previously learned concepts of behavior analysis and connect it to the practical world for teachers and educators. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how to use the principles and practices of applied behavioral management in the classroom. Classroom-based examples and practices firmly grounded in research will be discussed. This course will address identifying target behavior, collecting and graphing data, functional assessment, experimental design, arranging antecedents and consequences, generalizing behavior change, and the importance of ethical considerations in using applied behavior analysis in the classroom. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze classroom examples that show teachers using applied behavior analysis techniques in different settings. This course will also include the first practicum requirements for BCaBA certification. Prerequisites: IHS 465, IHS 466, and IHS 467.

Prerequisites: IHS 466 and IHS 465 and IHS 467 (may be taken concurrently)

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 474 Functional Analysis and Ethics (4 credits)

This course is designed to expand upon the previously learned concepts of behavior analysis and will present the student with information on observation, data collection, and data interpretation. Students will learn the methods for obtaining descriptive data and the procedures for conducting systematic manipulations. Functional assessments and analysis of individual behaviors will be a primary focus. Specific single subject experimental designs will be discussed. The ethical considerations inherent in behavioral assessment, treatment, and research will be reviewed. This course will also include the second practicum requirements for BCaBA certification. Prerequisites: IHS 465, IHS 466, IHS 467, and IHS 473.

Prerequisites: IHS 465 and IHS 466 and IHS 467 and IHS 473 (may be taken concurrently)

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 475 Coping with Autism (3 credits)

This course explores how families and service providers cope with autism. The impact of autism on parents, siblings, grandparents and others close to the family is discussed, particularly around coping with the behaviors associated with autism and the reactions of others. In addition, how families cope with complex issues such as school placement and support services, respite time, marital relationships, economics of paying for services and other important and difficult issues faced by those who care for children and adults with autism are presented. Finally, the impact on service providers and their strategies for effective coping are explored.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 480 ABA Practicum I (3 credits)

IHS 480F ABA Practicum I supervision (0 credits)

IHS 481 ABA Practicum II (3 credits)

IHS 481F ABA Practicum II supervision (0 credits)

IHS 482 ABA Practicum III (3 credits)

IHS 482F ABA Practicum III supervision (0 credits)

IHS 490 Internship in IHS (3 credits)

This course will provide students with direct, hands-on experience in the health care field in an instructional setting. Offered in the summer only. Permission of the Director is required.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 491 Internship in Autism Studies (3 credits)

The course will provide students with direct, hands-on experience in working with children and/or adults with autism in a highly supervised, instructional setting. Offered in the summer only. Permission of the Director is required.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

IHS 493 Independent Study (3 credits)

Students who have completed four regular semesters with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field) may, with the prior approval of the chairs and Dean's office concerned, register each semester for one upper division course in the major field (or a closely related field) to be taken in the Independent Study/Directed Readings or Research/Tutorial format. Such courses are offered to enrich the student's major program and not as a special arrangement to facilitate a student's fulfillment of course or credit requirements. Additional conditions are described in Guidelines for Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Similar Courses issued by the appropriate Dean's Office.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 494 Independent Study (3 credits)

Students who have completed four regular semesters with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (or cumulative average of 3.4 or higher for courses in the major field) may, with the prior approval of the chairs and Dean's office concerned, register each semester for one upper division course in the major field (or a closely related field) to be taken in the Independent Study/Directed Readings or Research/Tutorial format. Such courses are offered to enrich the student's major program and not as a special arrangement to facilitate a student's fulfillment of course or credit requirements. Additional conditions are described in Guidelines for Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Similar Courses issued by the appropriate Dean's Office.

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate

IHS 495 Seminar in Inter Health Svc (3 credits)

This course is offered as one of the final courses in the Interdisciplinary Health Services major to provide students with a solid platform in leadership, professionalism, and career development. Course content is based upon two overarching educational goals. The first major goal is to synthesize key themes and information that constitute the IHS curriculum, allowing students to review critical concepts and material. The second major goal is to help students transition from their undergraduate environment to the world of professional careers in health care; professional education in various clinical fields; or graduate education in health administration, public health, or health education. Prerequisites: IHS 110, 211, 323.

Prerequisites: (IHS 2101 or IHS 110) and (IHS 2231 or IHS 323 or SOC 323) and (IHS 2111 or IHS 211) and (IHS 2311 or IHS 331 (may be taken concurrently))

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major, minor, or concentration in Interdisciplinary Health Srvs.

Attributes: Undergraduate